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MAHO lost on Autobahn

They just use ball hitches, particularly on a trailer this small. In the photo of the trailer in the ditch and the perpetrator on the side of the road, you can see the truck he should have used passing by hauling two cars.
Fair enough. Chalk it up to translation issues maybe. Or, given the general state of Journalism today, a poor choice of wording by the reporter, if the quote was taken from so called 'News'.

Love to see some better pictures of the tow attachment to the car being used. The one picture with the car parked ahead of the wreck site does not seem to have a Tow Bar mounted as I would have expected, slung under the rear of the frame.

Gawds, I wonder if it was a bumper mount ball hitch? Those are pretty useful for hauling a light load of junk to the dump, but not much else!
 
Stupid rules here for towbars .....the bars have to be battleship thick plate,but its then OK to bolt the bar onto thin car sheetmetal ,at most 1/16" thick............... safety chains that would anchor the Bismark ,and have to be stamped Gr80 on every component or a $400 fine.
 
Stupid rules here for towbars .....the bars have to be battleship thick plate,but its then OK to bolt the bar onto thin car sheetmetal ,at most 1/16" thick............... safety chains that would anchor the Bismark ,and have to be stamped Gr80 on every component or a $400 fine.
You say "Stupid Rules" as if you think you folk have a lock on suffering from the stuff.

Hate to say it, but the whole world has those! They just vary in their imagination and annoyance levels...

But, if you want to have some fun, contract a Chinese supplier, to send you a bunch of stamps so that you can 'approve' all the chain that you might wish! Or chunks of dried Cheddar...

FWIW, here in Canada, each tow receiver mount has a maximum weight rating, or "Class" that tells what the weight you should be able to tow is. They have to meet minimum design requirements to get their Rating (ie:they need to actually be solidly anchored and the structure adequate for the load).Then you must account for the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight (the max that the tow vehicle and the trailer together are allowed to weigh), as well as to be aware of what the trailer itself weighs empty. But we don't have anyone checking for markings on the emergency chains...yet...
My (now deceased) Ford F150, was able to manage, legally, a 4000 pound load, on my 1800 or so pound flat bed trailer, which was rated as a 7500 pound capacity trailer. Towing that same trailer behind an F350, my limit becomes the max weight that the axles are rated for. More or less the weight of the trailer and load combined, to 7500 pounds. With a better trailer, I am legal to haul MUCH more weight with a F350.

As an aside, not really getting the "one Strap" hold down. I moved a 4000 pound CNC mill on my flat deck, I used ALL the chains and binders, as well as ALL the 5000 pound Lift Rated ratchet straps I could lay hands on. By the time I was done tying that mill down, I had EVERY confidence that I could have gone Off-Roading, and not had it bust loose. I mean, that thing was trussed up tighter than the Turkey at a BDSM Thanksgiving Dinner! I looked at it like it 'wanted' to escape, and 'what can I do to stop it?'
 
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Seriously. Who tries to pull a load like this with a passenger car?
No problem, captain ! and yeah, you can hook it to the bumper if you want :)

1952-buick-roadmaster-76r-for-sale-2018-11-26-1-1024x765.jpg
 
In the same German forum thread here is a picture of a Huron. No doubt the rigging is fine but still makes me leary. I would not move something as heavy as a Huron on a flatbed or trailer that didn't have tie down points all along the length of the bed.

huron.JPG

I like to have straps go across the machine. My autometric on a F550. Picked it up in Minnesota; about 750-800 mile round trip.
IMG_1462.JPG
 
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I used to use chains with chain binders to attach machinery to a truck bed. One in front and the other in the rear. Until I cracked a machine casting. Chain binders exert a lot of force. Expensive lesson to learn.
 
I've never been to Germany, but from a bit I've come across over the years in various places, German traffic cops seem to take there job seriously. Bad enough to have that much damage, but there's a good chance if the owner was cutting any corners on load limits for any component from the tow vehicle to even the tire ratings on that trailer. He could also be looking at some fairly serious fines on top of all the damage. And it won't matter if that component wasn't the cause. If anything was overloaded, there going to say you shouldn't have been on the road anyway and it wouldn't have happened. My best guess would be there going to treat this as a significant incident and do more checks and investigation than just issue a simple traffic ticket.

Fwiw I've driven a whole lot of miles with a class 1 and hauled a lot of freight. Some but not all that much with deck trailers though. I've also done a large amount of what would normally be crane work with excavators. Straps are ok when you have enough with the correct load rating. But many don't realize just how easy they can fail if there ever run across an edge that's even mildly sharp. I've also seen those straps fail almost instantly and well under there load rating just from a somewhat sharp edge when the guys hooking up on the ground didn't understand what they were doing. I've also seen the after effects when some really large slings slid off a loaders bucket teeth at the wrong time and dropped over 40 tons on a custom built $250k + trailer.

And on the highway, wind and road vibrations can accelerate that cutting effect by a lot. Softening any edges with even scraps of old carpet or a few layers of cardboard between the load and the strap helps a lot. Another trick is putting a half twist on each strap on each side before there fully tightened. That stops the wind flapping and vibration almost completely. If I'm hauling something like earth moving equipment or anything real heavy, I want chains and cinches. The handle end on those cinches also needs to be baling wired to the cinch body. Any road shock can sometimes cause them to pop open. But just like Rimcanyon mentioned, you have to understand where the load itself can tolerate that pressure.

And fwiw, any load will almost always settle or move around a bit. For longer distances, get the load secured and drive a few miles, stop and re-tighten if there's the slightest amount of slack. The same maybe 20 miles later. then an hr or two after that. I've hauled stacks of new flat deck trailers where the straps wouldn't stay fully tight for almost 2 days. None of this will help that guy, but maybe someone else here might save themselves from a real bad day or worse.
 
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I used to use chains with chain binders to attach machinery to a truck bed. One in front and the other in the rear. Until I cracked a machine casting. Chain binders exert a lot of force. Expensive lesson to learn.
I always have a chain from the rear of the trailer to the most secure high point of the machine, but it does not need to be tight. It is just in case I have to slam on the brakes.
 
Straps are ok when you have enough with the correct load rating. But many don't realize just how easy they can fail if there ever run across an edge that's even mildly sharp. I've also seen those straps fail almost instantly and well under there load rating just from a somewhat sharp edge.

And on the highway, wind and road vibrations can accelerate that cutting effect by a lot. Softening any edges with even scraps of old carpet or a few layers of cardboard between the load and the strap helps a lot. Another trick is putting a half twist on each strap on each side before there fully tightened.
i cut sections of bicycle inner tube and slip them over the straps where they cross a machine edge.
 
Can you not rent a truck in germany? Or just hire someone with a flatbed and a palfinger? I have always hated trailers myself, even though I have a much more capable tow vehicle.
Ya rent that tilt deck truck that loaded the machine on it in the photos!

Cheap safe option to move smaller machines like that
 
Here ,the cops wont come unless the road is blocked for 1/2day .......the towies are authorized to direct traffic ,clean up etc..............if the cops did come,then there would be a ticket for an "Improperly Secured Load",about $500..................you can also be ticketed for an unsecured load with just one item loose in the back of a pickup.,a shovel,or a toolbox.
 
It doesn't look like the trailer went too far, in the dirt at least. Don't remember if it was mentioned if the trailer had working breakaway brakes or not. Either the trailer wasn't going that fast and/or it had brakes that worked. Machine didn't end of that much farther than the trailer, or so it appears. If it had been properly tied down, it could easily have been a near-miss instead of a total loss. Then again if it was strapped down properly maybe the machine and trailer would have gone for a tumble. Lucky it went right rather than left.
 
Fair enough. Chalk it up to translation issues maybe. Or, given the general state of Journalism today, a poor choice of wording by the reporter, if the quote was taken from so called 'News'.

Love to see some better pictures of the tow attachment to the car being used. The one picture with the car parked ahead of the wreck site does not seem to have a Tow Bar mounted as I would have expected, slung under the rear of the frame.

Gawds, I wonder if it was a bumper mount ball hitch? Those are pretty useful for hauling a light load of junk to the dump, but not much else!

The towcar looks like an Audi Q7 which has a 3,200Kg (7,000 lb) tow limit for the common models, so probably within the letter of the rules with a 2 tonne machine. The towbar mounting would be bolted into the main "chassis" rails and aside from the hitch would be largely invisible (European regulations and approvals are strict). As Martin says in the first post, the driver lost the detachable tow hitch part. I've never felt the need for a detachable hitch. In my book it's a useful secondary parking aid.
 
The towcar looks like an Audi Q7 which has a 3,200Kg (7,000 lb) tow limit for the common models, so probably within the letter of the rules with a 2 tonne machine. The towbar mounting would be bolted into the main "chassis" rails and aside from the hitch would be largely invisible (European regulations and approvals are strict). As Martin says in the first post, the driver lost the detachable tow hitch part. I've never felt the need for a detachable hitch. In my book it's a useful secondary parking aid.
Do they not require safety chains? If the pin for hitch sheared or just fell out, safety chains would have kept car/trailer together.
 
I like to have straps go across the machine. My autometric on a F550. Picked it up in Minnesota; about 750-800 mile round trip.
View attachment 432508
Wouldn't call that tie down on the "Autometric" as being very secure.......
No front/rear restraint that i can see! Need a heavy strap or chain going low around the front of the machine and securely tied off at the rear of the trailer.
Need protection against the load moving forward in the event of an emergency stop. Lots of inertia there.

Cheers Ross
 
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