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MAHO lost on Autobahn

Wouldn't call that tie down on the "Autometric" as being very secure.......
No front/rear restraint that i can see! Need a heavy strap or chain going low around the front of the machine and securely tied off at the rear of the trailer.
Need protection against the load moving forward in the event of an emergency stop. Lots of inertia there.

Cheers Ross
Here's another view. The middle 2 straps stop it moving forwards or backwards. The pics you see is after I had taken the tension off the straps, because I couldn't get the stakebed sides off with the straps being taut, as the weight of the stake sides and their latching system pressed down on the straps.

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I made the skid and there is wood blocking that runs along all sides of the machine. It is screwed down onto the skid.

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I read the full german thread back when it was released in that forum and the driver clearly stated that he stayed well within all the permissible loads, this was also checked by police on site. As well as having the load in the right spot on the trailer for correct tongue load and proper attachments.

I would call this happening in that thread an unfortunate outlier, maybe also human error is involved - who knows. When I drive on the Autobahn I can always see small businesses hauling their working materials and gear with similar setups and this has been a proven and safe method of transportation. Its funny how quick people make up allegations by 2 or 3 pictures. But go ahead, rent a full blown truck for hauling a 1,6t machine. :rolleyes5:
 
But go ahead, rent a full blown truck for hauling a 1,6t machine. :rolleyes5:
Better to error on the side of safety than to be flippant.
Machines present “ unique” issues over similar weighted loads.
that of being somewhat tall with a relatively small footprint.
Pretty sure the owner would have told “ authorities” he did everything perfect, but there is the machine lying in the ditch.
Cheers Ross
 
3rd ask, are safety chains required? I see mention of breakaway brakes, but nobody has answered if safety chains are used. As for what the driver claims, my experience is people will lie and contrive a story that makes it not their fault. I've towed thousands of miles, I've had a trailer whip because of improper loading, I've lost a trailer because the receiver was not latched properly, I've lost a trailer because it was a 2" receiver on a 1-7/8" ball. But I've never even heard of anyone having the receiver hitch pin shear (double shear) while towing.
 
Better to error on the side of safety than to be flippant.
Machines present “ unique” issues over similar weighted loads.
that of being somewhat tall with a relatively small footprint.
Pretty sure the owner would have told “ authorities” he did everything perfect, but there is the machine lying in the ditch.
Cheers Ross
Of course you could always use "the big guns" to be on the safe side. In Europe it is most common to haul things with trailers and that has proven to be a safe a reliable way, cases like these are still the absolute outliers, sometimes things go south while you did everything right and you are operating within the capacities of your equipment. That's life unfortunately (I don't know who is at fault in this case and I don't want to pardon the guy who this happended to). But I still think hauling a machine this size on a trailer is perfectly reasonable. I would have almost none of my machines in my hobby shop, especially not my lathe and mill, if I had to hire a rigging company for the moving.

In Europe, you already need a truck drivers licence at a relatively low weight and they are very expensive, while the trailer drivers licence is rather cheap. Thats why its uncommon for private people to rent trucks. And the cost of renting a truck+driver is hardly justified for hobby purposes.

From my encounters with the authorities I'm pretty sure they wanted to see the paperwork of the car and trailer and probably a manual or document which stated the weight of the freight. Whatever traffic situation you get into with authorities involved, the first question is drivers licence and car/trailer paperwork. Other than that there is not much evidence to gather other than the persons statement of course.

3rd ask, are safety chains required? I see mention of breakaway brakes, but nobody has answered if safety chains are used. As for what the driver claims, my experience is people will lie and contrive a story that makes it not their fault. I've towed thousands of miles, I've had a trailer whip because of improper loading, I've lost a trailer because the receiver was not latched properly, I've lost a trailer because it was a 2" receiver on a 1-7/8" ball. But I've never even heard of anyone having the receiver hitch pin shear (double shear) while towing.
In Europe, safety chains are not required. In fact I had to look up what they look like because I've never heard that term.
 
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In Europe you need a safety chain if the trailer itself has no breaks Generaly below 750kg total weight of trailer and load
I have hauled many machines that way Overloaded trailer also The only accident had nothing to do with the trailer or hitch Accidents happen Overkill rigging does not prevent that It indicates unexperience or unsureness even perhaps
Peter
 
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Inexperience and unsureness?

Try telling your theory to some judge after the fact when there deciding who's at fault. Any prosecutor worth the title would just love to hear it. By pure luck that trailer headed off and below the roads shoulder and no one else was apparently involved. It's load or parts of it could have just as easily ended up through someones windshield. And I've seen the results of a few fatal truck accidents when there own load went through the cab.

Extra chains, cinches and straps are for when things don't go as perfect as expected. Even more so on the highway. Adding extra is just the opposite of what you seem to think. It's an additional safety factor and CYA over and above the minimum requirements. And I'll go with all the people who helped train me and my own OTJ experience to say that.
 
No chains please on a machine and/or a trailer like this
Peter
Nothing wrong with chains, Peter, provided the user has above a room temperature IQ, and takes the time to properly pad the places where the chains apply their pressure.

But mainly, the talk of chains seems to be about whether there is a Euro requirement, similar to most of North America, where a trailer of almost any sort, is required, in addition to the hitch that fits the tow ball or pintle, to have a set of chains also attached to the trailer, that can be hooked in to the Tow Hitch assembly, to provide a redundancy in case of errors in hitching up, or failures of the hitch or ball/pintle-hook.
Heavier trailers over this side of the water (and likely other places) that normally use electric brakes, usually also have a breakaway switch that applies a battery voltage to the trailer brakes if the trailer separates from the vehicle.
 
I sold a small lathe to a guy,and he turned up with a box trailer with flat and cracked tires ,one had a bubble of tube showing .....no worries ,sez he .....................The boat guy next to me sold a new ski boat on a new tandem trailer ,the lot was back two hours later ......the guy had caught one side of the trailer on a freeway median divider ,tore out the axles,and the ski boat went for a ski on the bitumen.......upside down.
 
Big boy move calls for big boy equipment!
FP2NC, FP4NC, 2 electrical cabinets, two transformers, Universal table and the required forklift.....
No fumbles, no dropped machines,no problem.
Not a professional rigger here, just a friend who has the goods.......
And oh yes, chains work best here when you have a proper trailer that has full tie down positioning so you can route the chains where they don't touch anything ....

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Cheers Ross
 
"alfa GTA pictures"
I like the picture of having a FP2 and FP4 next to each other, to comparison! I wish I had the bigger one.
Very nice hookup on the trailer! That strapdown for sure is safe enough and more or less perfect.
I just find it amazing you cold fit and have the weight limitation with the forklifter with them both Deckels on the trailer simultaneous, but I guess America is Special:)
Best regards Henrik
 
Big boy move calls for big boy equipment!
FP2NC, FP4NC, 2 electrical cabinets, two transformers, Universal table and the required forklift.....
No fumbles, no dropped machines,no problem.
Not a professional rigger here, just a friend who has the goods.......
And oh yes, chains work best here when you have a proper trailer that has full tie down positioning so you can route the chains where they don't touch anything ....

full


full


Cheers Ross
Amazed and surprised that Ram 3500 dually could pull those machine + the forklift. That looks like a pre 2010 Ram?
 
These pickups have twice or three times the power of a 1959 Mack B61 tandem ,that would easily pull a float with a D9 on it ......70 tons ..........back in the day ,I drove trucks pulling bogie trailers (36ton) with a 354 Perkins diesel ...120 hp ,and my old man pulled a semi trailer with a Ford flathead 8 .....95hp..
 
May be something of the translation from German to English, or they could as well have been using a variation of a ring and pintle hook hitch in the receiver of the towing vehicle. I have both types for use on my truck, ball hitches of several sizes, as well as a very industrial sized Pintle Hitch. Both systems rely upon that all the attaching hardware is tight, as well as that the pin used to secure the hitch itself in the receiver on the vehicle, is both of suitable strength and properly installed.

Maybe one of the more Euro guys can fill in? Are most using a Ball Hitch (ball on the tow vehicle, socket on the trailer tongue), or are they using something different generally, over there?
Most European towing is done with a ball hitch on cars and small trucks. Didn't check what car they were using, but the trailer looks like a car trailer, so good for at least 1500 kg, probably more.
We don't use chains but a safety wire, that should be hooked up somwhere other than the hitch. It locks the trailer brakes, if the trailer gets unhooked.

Kjelle
 
Fair enough. Chalk it up to translation issues maybe. Or, given the general state of Journalism today, a poor choice of wording by the reporter, if the quote was taken from so called 'News'.

Love to see some better pictures of the tow attachment to the car being used. The one picture with the car parked ahead of the wreck site does not seem to have a Tow Bar mounted as I would have expected, slung under the rear of the frame.

Gawds, I wonder if it was a bumper mount ball hitch? Those are pretty useful for hauling a light load of junk to the dump, but not much else!
The tow bar is conceled behind the bumper, and the ball hitch is all you see. It is mounted on the "frame rails" (Unibody car). Sorry, I don't have any links or pic's of European towing equipment...

Kjelle
 
Most European towing is done with a ball hitch on cars and small trucks. Didn't check what car they were using, but the trailer looks like a car trailer, so good for at least 1500 kg, probably more.
We don't use chains but a safety wire, that should be hooked up somwhere other than the hitch. It locks the trailer brakes, if the trailer gets unhooked.

Kjelle
Thanks for the insight.
 








 
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