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Major hard drive failure -- who has experience with data recovery?

W_Higgins

Hot Rolled
Joined
Mar 13, 2009
Location
Realville, Penna.
The power in my shop short-cycled during a recent storm and when the power came back on, my PC was "hard drive not found". I shipped it off to a reputable repair outfit that handles complex cases only for them to say, "the issues is the controller chip, which is not replaceable" and that maybe a full-blown data recovery place can help.. The unit a Samsung 870 EVO SSD. I called a higher level place, but their engineer said that (at least at this time) they are not equipped to handle it and recommended a couple of other places that might.

Does anyone here have any real-world experience with an issue this severe and, if so, did you find a place capable of working on it?
 
Had the same issue the other day on my boss's computer.
First I double checked the BIOS boot order, then I fixed it by removing all the things that were plugged into the USB ports.
It then booted right up. For some reason even though the boot order was correct, it was still looking for the OS on a usb stick.

Also I think that Best Buy offers a data recovery service.

You can also look at this from Tom's Hardware:
https://www.tomsguide.com/how-to/how-to-recover-data-from-a-hard-drive
 
W_Higgins, I've had successful data recovery in years past but only from real spinning disks. Everything is completely different for solid-state "disks" (SSD), and I haven't heard anything about SSD recovery.
I will note that Sandisk Extreme V2 SSDs have failed catastrophically in significant numbers recently (last 6 months), there is a huge commotion going on in the affected circles, lawsuits being launched, and nobody is reporting any significant success in data recovery on those SSDs. But that may be an issue with those particular SSDs.
 
Best of luck to you. I come from the days of the spinning-disk hard drive. I have no experience with a solid state drive of today and data recovery off that format. If you find a place that can actually do it, an update here would be fantastic.
 
Ring the police HQ and ask for phorensic department, talk nice and they will tell you where they get recovery done on trashed computers.
Works over here, they gave me the name of an engineer who fixed one for me but a disc HDD not solid state, they have ways.
Just a suggestion, might as well use them for something
Their not much good at crime
Mark
 
I had a physical hard drive that had data recovered (similar to sfriedberg's experience I guess). My brother in law works in investigations and they have to do forensic accounting and stuff. They recovered the data but it cost $800. Depending upon the failure mode, I would be less likely to expect that a ssd could be recovered. Bingle data recovery service ssd. There's a lot of them, so I guess it is possible sometimes. Good luck. Oh, I suspect that they have AI listening in on your call when you call these services. The AI algorithm detects how stressed you are and the price is adjusted.

I'd just say "My pc SSD doesn't work and I'd like to recover some stuff on there. " and not answer any questions about what the SSD does. Probably price is time sensitive, too. Just sayin'
 
Did not know AI is listening for stress, no wonder I get hammered after 50 mins on hold listening to crap music interceded with your call is important please hold I’m not stressed I’m homicidal ( well a bit)
Mark
 
Sandisk makes good SSDs, there aren't many others I would ever consider. I hope you get your data.

Keep in mind that most places that advertise recovery services are just middlemen. They may try and use off the shelf software, before passing it along to an actual service at a premium. Sometimes that's all you need - recovery software. There is very good free recovery software.

Controller chip or board failures are often fixed by temporarily swapping in a like board from another drive. Big recovery places have an inventory of those, and the know-how to do the swap (beyond merely connecting).

Trying to recover data can reduce the chance of actually recovering data. Especially with mechanical failures. And Windows - it still tries to automatically create directories on a drive when it discovers it. That writing to the drive can destroy data you are trying to recover.

I tend to think an SSD is more vulnerable to getting 'zapped' and lost, while spinning rust is more likely to be there even after a zap. Of course one thump can crash a HDD.

The other thing about SSD's is that the 'charge' that retains the information degrades if not refreshed. So if you store info on a drive and plan to put it away for months or years? It may be gone. That is especially true for 'thumb drives', which are much less robust.
 
My understanding is that SSD drives dead is dead buuhbye
I had a mag drive recovered years ago for a grand
One file had become corrupt
my quickbooks file
go figure
 
I have had experience using the company named DriveSavers to recover data from badly damaged SSD drives as well as SATA hard drives. You might contact them if you have not already spoken to them.
 
I've sent off mechanical drives for recovery. It's been a long time now, but what I remember they came at me with a huge price- Like $2500 or something so I told them to send it back. When I get it back they reached out saying they could do the job at a lower $500 rate or something. So I sent it back and they did the job. I got 95% of what was on the HD. Some stuff wasn't recoverable.
 
Years ago I got lax with backups and went about 4 months without one, My drive crashed I sent the drive (spinning) to drivesavers, They said they couldn't recover any data. I would have paid almost anything to get back all the programming work I had done I even begged them. No luck. they said the head crashed into the platter and everything was gone.

I now use a SSD drive as my working drive but also have two mirrored spinning drives that I regularly (weekly) backup to... I also have an external drive I backup to, In case of lightning, virus, fire or teft I keep it disconnected and in the safe.

Best of luck getting your data I know how much it sucks.
 
W_Higgins, I've had successful data recovery in years past but only from real spinning disks. Everything is completely different for solid-state "disks" (SSD), and I haven't heard anything about SSD recovery.
I will note that Sandisk Extreme V2 SSDs have failed catastrophically in significant numbers recently (last 6 months), there is a huge commotion going on in the affected circles, lawsuits being launched, and nobody is reporting any significant success in data recovery on those SSDs. But that may be an issue with those particular SSDs.
I have some Sandisk SSD drives, and have been following the drama. Basically, Western Digital now admits that there was a firmware problem, but claims limited impact. Which seems unlikely to me. Someone is suing them, seeking class-action status.

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/202...ask-over-sandisk-ssds-allegedly-erasing-data/

I would guess that there are companies that can take the failed SSD apart and bypass that firmware. But if the bad firmware already scrambled the data, no joy.

I use at least two backup drives, and run them in a N-media cycle (N=2 for now). These drives are not online at all, unless I am actually backing up.

In the 1970s and 1980s, I used a 7-tape cycle, because the hardware of that day was not all that reliable. At least one tape was kept remote and locked up, so desparate people could not destroy it by accident.
 
THe way I run my office PC is SSD for operating system, mag for storage. I backup to thumb drive regularly. I should do more backup.
Basically I have to have a machine die, my PC die and my thumbdrive die to lose programs. I have programs saved at home also.
Most of my customers pay their bills so I can recover my quickbooks framework and most programs easily in case of a fire etc, but mostly this will be the least of my problems
 








 
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