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Mikron Haas VCE 750 communication issues over RS-232 link

I don't want to sound like I'm just throwing random stuff at the wall but, about a year ago, I was troubleshooting a misbehaving rotary box on a 2004 VF-2. I must have read every RS-232 Haas post on the web in that month or so. Somewhere in all of that, I do remember at least one who had a bad serial chip on one of the boards. There was also one that had a problem with the physical port on the side of the machine and the ribbon cable going to it.

Some of us picture our own pampered machines in our heads and we aren't looking at the horrible physical condition some machines are in after so many years. It could be whiskers of corrosion bridging pins. Someone may have been in there for a battery replacement years ago and pinched one of those ribbons against the sheet metal, or any number of other possibilities. Opening up the cabinet and pulling the board stack one at a time and doing some physical inspection could make some sense.

If none of those show anything, I'm still (like others) suspicious of overloading the input buffer.
100% good info, In his case he has a computer that is 100% working.
and a new computer that is 50% working.
So in this case the puter is the issue, but good points.
 
Sometimes you are screwed .... Silicon Graphics 3000 series machines had a firewire driver. Firewire worked really well with them ... but only with the TI chip and oddly enough, adaptec had a couple versions of the same card with supposedly the same chip (but different revisions ?) -- the blue card worked, the red card did not.

That doesn't happen as often with really mainstream stuff but serial ports are getting to be kind of arcane. RS stands for 'recommended standard', not all companies implement everything correctly :( Look in your hardware inventory, I bet the chips between the two laptops are not the same.
As in Apple firewire?
 
I have 25 pin connector on machine side, this looks like its 9 pin.
The closer you put it to the cnc, the better. If you can find a 25 pin version of appropriate gender, that would be best. The 9 pin should work just fine, though.
 
Just to add to the topic, and my previous
I have seen a lot of issues of people using laptops, espeshly using a USB to RS232.
I found it a lot easier to get a old junker tower computer from my computer graveyard in the basement,
buy and throw in a 25pin RS232 card, machine usually has 25 pin on the other end.
Get this computer to work with the machine,
then this computer is just added to the ethernet network,
this way I never need to get new computers to work with the machines.
2 cents.
 
100% good info, In his case he has a computer that is 100% working.
and a new computer that is 50% working.
So in this case the puter is the issue, but good points.
Yeah, I took that into consideration. A pinched ribbon with only a few strands hanging on, or maybe some corrosion. Then toss in a 3.3V serial chip on the new laptop instead of 5V and they can't hear each other over the electrical noise in the Haas cabinet. Or maybe a lower voltage serial chip is the sole culprit in the new laptop.
 
IEEE 1394, ya dang hippy. It was actually pretty popular for audio and video hardware. I had an external disk that was way-fast compared to usb, too.

Another good thing that bit the dust over a $2 cost difference ...
When this hit vs USB, no competition, it was WAY faster than USB.
just never picked up.
Yeah when I used to do DV video editing and post, this where you saw it.
 
100% good info, In his case he has a computer that is 100% working.
and a new computer that is 50% working.
So in this case the puter is the issue, but good points.
Sorry but it's not 50%, its 87,5% working. (3 machines it works 100%).
 
The closer you put it to the cnc, the better. If you can find a 25 pin version of appropriate gender, that would be best. The 9 pin should work just fine, though.
But if I take 9pin version it won't be on cnc side it will be directly attached to computer.
 
if I take 9pin version it won't be on cnc side it will be directly attached to computer
If you use standard cables (no custom rewiring), it's not a problem. The idea is to see the signals that the cnc sees: that's why I suggested it should be at the cnc end. If there's a problem with the laptop setting handshaking signals properly, you'll see it with the 9 pin version
 
well there is custom rewiring...
It's a good thing that you don't need this to work in a hurry. Really, I applaud you for trying to make a backup laptop now, while you still have the old laptop working.

That said, I'm not sure what to tell you if you don't want to spend $10 on a diagnostic tool. The two laptops behave differently, and in my opinion it's most likely the hardware handshaking lines. All the LED breakout will tell you is whether the handshaking lines are set the same by the 2 laptops. I think they'll be different. Then you have the pleasure of trying to figure out why, and that may not be easy.

So, forget what I said about putting the LED breakout close to the cnc. Put it directly on the laptop. I expect it will show that the two laptops set the handshaking lines differently. Then comes the diddling of settings, drivers, etc.

But at least it's not blind diddling.
 








 
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