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Moving. Move or Replace Mill?

n2zon

Cast Iron
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Location
Dutchess County NY
I live in NY State, but I don't plan to stay.

We are considering the northern parts of OH, PA, and MO.

I have a pretty worn J-head clone from Sharp. Good machine when it was new, everything works, but very "experienced.". I need to think about how to approach things to hold a mil on it. I can sell it or move it. I 'd have to rent or borrow a trailer to move it. What are machinery prices like in the three states I mentioned? Comparable, lower, or higher? Probably worth about $2.5K here, maybe a bit less. Open to a better machine within reason, but I know machinery prices vary by location, sometimes by a lot. The other stuff I have, I'll keep, but it could take another round trip to include the mill.

Would you sell it or move it, and why?

Thanks for any insights.
 
I live in NY State, but I don't plan to stay.

We are considering the northern parts of OH, PA, and MO.

I have a pretty worn J-head clone from Sharp. Good machine when it was new, everything works, but very "experienced.". I need to think about how to approach things to hold a mil on it. I can sell it or move it. I 'd have to rent or borrow a trailer to move it. What are machinery prices like in the three states I mentioned? Comparable, lower, or higher? Probably worth about $2.5K here, maybe a bit less. Open to a better machine within reason, but I know machinery prices vary by location, sometimes by a lot. The other stuff I have, I'll keep, but it could take another round trip to include the mill.

Would you sell it or move it, and why?

Thanks for any insights.

I live in northeastern Ohio. If I were you, I'd sell it. There are so many Bridgeport's around here, you are guaranteed to find a better machine for less money - and I don't even know what yours looks like.

You could go here and pick up half a dozen tomorrow morning if you wanted. https://hgrinc.com/?all=1&view=grid...ance=&search_type&brand=&item_location=euclid
 
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Isn't that Amish country? Pay them to help move.
From the title I thought the question was going to be how to move a shop building.
I have added to ten year old threads like by adding bearing numbers etc. In the last year I looked up on here where I had added the thread pitch on my tablesaw was 1-12 LH, acme to a old thread. That was easier for me then digging out my notes from long ago and one shop move.
Bill D
 
Edit your thread title to be more informative please, or the thread will be locked.
Edited. That OK? Be happy to add more. What do you want me to include? It's a Sharp YC with a 9x42 table. Basically a clone of a BP J-head 9x42 mill. Nothing special. I'm in the mid-Hudson Valley. Destination not determined but likely, as I said, northern parts of OH, PA, and MO are probable. Just trying to figure out whether to move it or sell it and replace it post-move.
 
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I live in northeastern Ohio. If I were you, I'd sell it. There are so many Bridgeport's around here, you are guaranteed to find a better machine for less money - and I don't even know what yours looks like.

You could go here and pick up half a dozen tomorrow morning if you wanted. https://hgrinc.com/?all=1&view=grid...ance=&search_type&brand=&item_location=euclid
Wow. Thanks for the link. Yeah, the prices are very reasonable there. I won't need half a dozen (smile). I might even scrap the one I have if I can't unload (er, I mean, sell) it, even if I have to move the "new" one.
 
You can check rough prices yourself using craiglist.

Sure I can. eBay, too. But that does not tell me about what things are going for in good condition. I could list mine for $2K and maybe get it, but I wouldn't want to buy it again. I'm just trying to figure out what the market is like where I'm probably going, and that takes some local knowledge I cannot get from CL.
 
Be happy to. What do you want me to include? It's a Sharp YC with a 9x42 table. Basically a clone of a BP J-head 9x42 mill. Nothing special. I'm in the mid-Hudson Valley. Destination not determined but likely, as I said, northern parts of OH, PA, and MO are probable. Just trying to figure out whether to move it or sell it and replace it post-move.
Moving, should I move or sell my milling machine.
Bill D
 
BOTOH you know the machine (and all it's quirks) plus once moved it will be plug and play.

True enough. It's as comfortable as an old shoe. But I won't bring it with us unless I can't afford to replace it with an equivalent or preferably less worn machine where we're going. Historically there have been threads about what machines cost in different areas of the country, and the disparity can be substantial.
 
Edited. That OK? Be happy to add more. What do you want me to include? It's a Sharp YC with a 9x42 table. Basically a clone of a BP J-head 9x42 mill. Nothing special. I'm in the mid-Hudson Valley. Destination not determined but likely, as I said, northern parts of OH, PA, and MO are probable. Just trying to figure out whether to move it or sell it and replace it post-move.

I just want it to be clear what the subject is so people don't have to click on your thread to figure out what the heck you're talking about if it's something they don't have any input on. That's right in the rules sticky thread. Bill's suggestion was perfect. "Move or replace" was not very informative. What you've got now is better.
 
If you sell it you’re still going to need to get the new one home after you find it. Moving a mill across state lines isn’t a ton different than moving one across town. It still needs to be well secured for safe transportation. By the time you subtract the hassle of selling yours, vetting a new machine, playing the HGR lottery, and getting your new one home I’m not sure you’ll be ahead.

Last time I moved a mill a long distance I bolted it to a pair of 4x4’s, paid a wrecker to get it to deck height, rolled it onto my rented wooden deck moving truck, lagged it to the floor, and did the reverse getting it out. I did have to patch the floor of the truck, but only because the truck I rented didn’t have tie down points trustworthy for that sort of load.

If you were not moving and a $2500 mill in slightly better condition showed up across town would you take the trouble of buying it and selling yours?

Note, I’m assuming you are moving yourself and aren’t otherwise going to relocate your household in a single trip of a personality owned vehicle, though if you are that changes the costs.

If you’re going to hire movers, they are a pain for big heavy stuff like this, though a large portion of that cost is crating, and poorly at that. Crate it yourself and have it at the curb and they’ll be much easier on you. Even then it might be expensive enough that it’s worth selling and re-buying, or just moving the machine yourself and letting the movers handle everything else.
 
Considering a move from NY to northern parts of OH, PA, or MO, and faced with the decision regarding your worn J-head clone milling machine, factors like machinery prices in the new location become crucial.
 
Nobody else can really answer this for you. We don't know the sort of work you're doing, what your budget for a replacement machine might be or how long you can go without the mill.

Craigslist has been pretty dead for several years and most people have moved to Facebook Marketplace. Around here there's one dealer who floods CL with ads, and one or two guys who flip stuff they buy at auction, but that's about it. I see the same thing in OH/PA and have heard others say it's like that many other places now.

Going the HGR route is taking on an unknown since you can't see the machine under power. You're probably buying a project going that route, and then you might as well just refresh your current mill since you already know what's worn.

There are regularly auctions in Ohio with decent machinery at pretty good prices, but you'd have to get there, watch the auctions, do previews, evaluate the machines and see what happens. If you can be without a mill for a couple of months that's not a bad strategy.

I'm taking an early retirement in the next 2-3 years and we're moving, but I know where we're going will be a machinery desert so I'm planning to have to move everything...it's not going to be cheap (1,000+ miles).
 
Imo. Ime. Never ever sell it, if it´s working and making any money at all.

The ancillary costs and gotchas are more expensive than the price of the machine+moving.

Another machine may have, is likely to have, some parts of the ways less tight than what you expect.
Some collets may or may not fit well, or at the same points you expect.
The spindle may have issues under load, different to your current one.

Any single problem that you don´t expect could potentially ruin a workpiece worth $$, $ for some, and $$$ for others.

Working PM-type shops:
It costs about 20.000 $ minimum in second-hand stuff to have a working general job-shop or machine-shop.
Racks, collets, tools, tool-holders, inserts, inspection, measuring, lifting, end mills == tooling, possibly fixture plates, fixtures, indexers, endless list.

But if Your use is say simply drilling (very) good holes (slots) in agricultural equipment, or car parts, fittings for whatever (cars, houses, boats) by milling manually, you wont need to worry about any of that.
It´s still much better and much cheaper with the opportunity costs to move your stuff vs buying new-old.

E:
A new(used) heavy BP interact (?) or CNC or one of the 2-3000 kg heavy versions with bigger spindles (MT3 maybe) in great/perfect nick, for the same amount of money you got for your old one, at the place You are going for, is potentially a great deal.

But IF there is wear in some part of the ways, or some part of the quill, this might make it extremely difficult to work, needing accurate blocking and endless work-arounds.

IF one has money, then getting a new(old) good bigger machine, and all the ancillaries, is very attractive.
But this is very very expensive, and as You are asking as the OP, this seems like a not-attractive proposition.
 
My mill was on the moving truck and we ran out of room, so I had to give it away (we had about 1 week to leave).
Now where I am, I haven't found anything remotely comparable in 2-1/2 years.
Took a year and a half to find a decent South Bend 9a under $2000, whereas back in CT, you can't spit without hitting a good one at a decent price.

Steve
 








 
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