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My Lodge & Shipley 16" Model A freebie

speleoflutist

Plastic
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Location
Worton, Maryland
I recently acquired a 16" Lodge & Shipley lathe, which after much trawling of this forum, I take to be a model A. I received this machine as a result of a neighbors farm estate clean out where the owners didn't want to see it go to the scrap yard. Another neighbor of mine, who was doing the hauling for this clean out, even delivered it 2 miles to my yard for free. I like my neighbors a lot, as you might imagine.

Vintage machinery's website dates it to 1942 with a serial number 32998. It has had much abuse and neglect in its life, looking rather like it was in a forklift demolition derby, but so far my disassembly hasn't revealed any deal breaking issues as far as its cleaning and repair is concerned. It comes with 4 jaw universal, steady rest and taper attachment. That later was what made me jump on it. Everything is gummed up and it is presently going through a gear train disassembly and cleaning to get things shifting and turning easily. The headstock seems to work fine, and is amazingly balanced, but everything else is full of oily gum, paint and swarf. I'm opting to look under the headstock cover before a powered attempt. Headstock oil sight glasses are opaque and need replacing.

Being a dumbass farmer with no reconditioning experience, this is another "do no harm" situation. Clean out the crud, remove surface rust with a metal finishing pad or electrolysis and see what's left.

What's broken:
The head end bracket for the feed rod and lead screw has a broken casting projection at the bottom (located behind the reversing bell crank). I'm convinced it was part of a "reverse to leadscrew" option, based upon other present and missing fittings.

The crossfeed clutch handle is a homemade replacement for the original. I may be able to do better. The longitudinal feed clutch handle has been broken and subsequently repaired, but probably still servicable.

Some doofus took a hammer to one of the oil plugs on the saddle, peening it in tight. It feeds the wick gallery for the rear apron bushings. That will be a struggle to remove...

Most oil cups have no spring caps. They are being removed. Oil wicks are plugged with grease and will be replaced.

What's worn:
Cross feed screw and nut are VERY tired. I'm considering rebuild/replace in the long term, but will use as is if I get it running.

Longitudinal gear train bushings in the apron need replacing. Given the plugged nature of the wicks, they haven't seen lubrication in many years. I had to turn the outer handwheel spindle boss down a tad and plan to fit an undersize bushing to match it.

What's good:
A previous painting, that covers everything that shouldn't have had paint on it, has likely preserved those surfaces from years of neglect corrosion. Scraping that off generally reveals unrusted surfaces, which should save a bit of elbow grease with the metal finishing pad. Still, maybe the same guy with the ball peen hammer did the painting...

So far:
Disassembled, Cleaned and Reassembled the taper attachment, compound rest, QC gearbox and end gear train. End gears reinstalled. Now on to the rest of the lead and feed system...
 

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Greg, weren't you a former volunteer at the Tuckahoe machine shop? And speleoflutist, you are not that far away. We can always use volunteers. We are currently working on a counter shaft to get the Fellows gear shaper up and running for the show in July. We're also in the middle of restorations on a Putnam gap bed lathe and a Hendy lathe. After these get done, or close to it, there's a large pulley lathe that is next up. We would love to see you guys any Saturday!

Dan
 
Greg, weren't you a former volunteer at the Tuckahoe machine shop? And speleoflutist, you are not that far away. We can always use volunteers. We are currently working on a counter shaft to get the Fellows gear shaper up and running for the show in July. We're also in the middle of restorations on a Putnam gap bed lathe and a Hendy lathe. After these get done, or close to it, there's a large pulley lathe that is next up. We would love to see you guys any Saturday!

Dan
Careful, I might just show up if I can get away from farming for a time, and then folks would be like, "Who let that old unwashed hippie in here?"

Sounds like a good way to learn more about the care and feeding of old iron, which I much prefer to the new stuff. Years ago I was bidding against you guys for the Joe Suydam collection, but I'm just as glad to see it found a good home.
 
Careful, I might just show up if I can get away from farming for a time, and then folks would be like, "Who let that old unwashed hippie in here?"

Sounds like a good way to learn more about the care and feeding of old iron, which I much prefer to the new stuff. Years ago I was bidding against you guys for the Joe Suydam collection, but I'm just as glad to see it found a good home.
Come by some Saturday and you can at least visit Joe's fantastic machinery.
 
Good luck with the new beast. I run 2 of those regularly and have completely rehabbed the 1941 version. We have some misc parts laying that may get you out of trouble with missing pics.
Johnny
 








 
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