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Natural cutting lubricant for aluminium?

I was going to mention Buttercutt, which is almost all bio-based, but the can does say, "harmful or fatal if swallowed." Most of these things have (IMHO) better properties than petro oils but they tend to go rancid after a while. Bacon fat also works, as does Crisco, but I just don't want that stuff on my machines.
 
Anchor Lube. In its original form, it won't work in a spray bottle; has to be brushed on. Never tried thinning it with water to see if it will spray?

I used to mix the Anchor Lube 50/50 with water. Then when it dries out add more water. I stopped using it, it's ok, but not great.

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sometimes use McM 1308K4 apparently also known as Plumbers Lard Oil

From the McM site
Also known as plumber's lard oil, these light-colored, sulfur-free lubricants won't stain soft metal, such as aluminum or copper. They reduce friction between your cutting tool and workpiece to make cutting cycles faster and easier, improve surface finishes, and extend tool life. Lubricants are chlorine free for use where chlorine waste disposal is a concern. Use at full strength.

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I use WD40 in a spray bottle occasionally, probably toxic as hell
 
The old shop switched to Acculube from black oil-more ecologically sound, worked well. They had a solid form of it that I used when jig grinding alum, worked well there too.
Try bacon grease on the tap, used it when I could when turning Armco iron, made the shop smell like breakfast. Never had luck with kerosene.
 
I was going to mention Buttercutt, which is almost all bio-based, but the can does say, "harmful or fatal if swallowed." Most of these things have (IMHO) better properties than petro oils but they tend to go rancid after a while. Bacon fat also works, as does Crisco, but I just don't want that stuff on my machines.
I loved using that stuff, that's why I mentioned it...it smells like a chicken shack when you get to cutting and making a lil smoke. Always made me hungry. That was the original Butterfield tap co stuff...not sure about the current mixture.

Whoever wrote the sds for buttercutt must be retarded...
 
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I wouldn't know about such things, but more to the point, how do you?
Don't you look at that worthless spam in your email box. Just don't do any clicking.
Actually I believe it. Whenever I went to the beach and got tangled up in some seaweed, always a slippery mess.
So I looked it up. Long chain molecules sliding next to each other. Graphite is another one I like.
 
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Back in the 70s me and the mrs worked at an Ali extrusion plant, she was a fabricator, they used what they called saw wax, I didn’t have a clue what it was, turned out to be tallow,
Mark
The local extrusion plant near me would use bars of Irish Spring soap whenever they had sticking issues. I wonder if it’s one of those cases where something is almost always better than nothing?
 
I have used blaser Vasco mill.
It's a vegetable oil straight oil.
Very high flash point and cleans off easily with dish soap and water or solvent.
Original title said natural and the post talked about non toxic. I wondered if someone was going to mention Blaser's Vasco.

Been using it for 19 years (since Vasco 1000). Now on the last of my Vasco 5000 and will move to the current general product, Vasco 6000. The data sheet still says 1 for both health and fire and zero for reactivity.

It's obviously for flood coolant systems but, also don't see why one couldn't mix it and use it in spray bottles. It rinses mostly clean with water. It hasn't attacked the paint on anything I've used it in. Somehow, it takes away minor rust and dark stains on cast iron and steel tooling. Everything looks better after running in a constant spray of it. It's also very forgiving in the sumps I've used it in. They usually go 3-4 years between change-outs. It runs in both of my CNC machines and the horizontal bandsaw, as well as a friend's Haas.

Because it's so stable, it shouldn't go rancid in a bottle or after time on the machine surfaces, the way some food-based products might. What's the downside? It's OMG expensive. I believe a five-gallon pail of concentrate is now $450. Suggested mix ratio in water is 10%.

Every time I see the Blaser guys at a trade show, I stop to ask and catch up: "Anything better that you've come up with? Happy with the product. Do mixed machining. Mostly aluminum, some steel and stainless, occasional titanium. Nothing flight certified. You have anything new that you suggest trying?" They always shake their head and say if I'm happy with the foaming performance, skin effects and similar, to stick with Vasco.
 
Been using it for 19 years (since Vasco 1000). Now on the last of my Vasco 5000 and will move to the current general product, Vasco 6000. The data sheet still says 1 for both health and fire and zero for reactivity.
Best product of the 3 IMHO was the Vasco 1000. They stopped making it because of retarded California restrictions. Vasco 6000 is much better than 5000 for sure. None of them were cheap though.
 








 
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