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So I have cleaned the SB 14.5 and have it down on the leveling feet. Got my new motor installed and am looking for information on the spindle clearances. I used a dial indicator on the end of the spindle by the adjusting nut for side to side clearance. When I use a wood dowel to lift up I get the gauge reading of .0015 thousands on the pic. below, the bearing caps are just barley tighten. On the chuck end with the bearing caps loose I do not get the gauge to move at all. Is this clearance okay? I have oiled the spindle and the machine seems to run okay with no bad noises. What should it be on this machine? Machine was built in 1942. Also is there a special procedure for removing the bearing caps? If I have to change the shims I don't want to due any damage to anything.
 

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Newer style spindle bearings are a little more complicated. You don't have that.

Any shims under the caps will be under the two ears of cap, where the two bolts are. There is no removable bearing. The cap and headstock itself are the bearing surface. With caps locked done tight, I'd like .001" to .0015", with .0012" being optimal imo. Back and forth endplay on thrust washer about .0005".

Not knowing the history, I'd be in high favor of replacing the spring loaded felts for the spindle and bearing surface. That requires lifting spindle out. The felts are dead at 6 oclock.:

Plus changing the oil in the cavities there.

You mentioned using a wood dowel. Dont be shy checking the oil clearance. Get a decent pry bar in under cone pulley and put maybe 50-75 pounds of pressure to lift spindle. Using your dial indicator at 12 oclock like in pic.

Another tip, roll spindle by hand while checking and tightening bolts. I want it rolling real nice and free. And end result with bolts locked down tight.
 
Get a piece of aluminum 1" bar. You're going to want to put about 75 pounds of force on it about a foot and a half from the end of the spindle. The bearing caps should be tight, not almost tight, but tight.

Using a tenths indicator, push down on the bar, zero the indicator, and the pull up. To be within spec, it should be between .0007" and .0015"

To small of clearance, and there is no room for oil and this will cause friction, galling and chatter.
 
So here's a way to wire it- modify the jumpers on the switch to be 'L' shaped (blue wires), and bring the line from the wall into the center upper and lower terminals. This will properly switch off both phases in the off position. The middle terminal of the switch will connect one end of the start winding to either phase, depending on switch direction. The other end of the start winding is connected to the 'star' point at the motor.

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I am having a hard time following the schematic, does the T5, T8 and T1 refer to the motor schematics? What other wires are jumped together inside the motor box? Perhaps I just need another cup of coffee and to stare at it longer, wiring is not my strong point.
 
Get a piece of aluminum 1" bar. You're going to want to put about 75 pounds of force on it about a foot and a half from the end of the spindle. The bearing caps should be tight, not almost tight, but tight.

Using a tenths indicator, push down on the bar, zero the indicator, and the pull up. To be within spec, it should be between .0007" and .0015"

To small of clearance, and there is no room for oil and this will cause friction, galling and chatter.
On newer style with copper type bearings, going toward the tighter side of spec you can get down toward .0007", with the thinner spindle oil. The copper helping out quite a bit, and being more forgiving.

The op has cast iron bearings though. My 16" which is a 2H turret lathe is also from 1942, and also has the cast iron bearings. It really didn't like when I tried adjusting below .001" oil clearance. And I tried spindle oil, light and med dte oils, experimenting tighter/looser. Spindle oil is really a dte oil, same stock and process, its just lighter than light dte.

Ultimately on mine, I got spindle clearance in the vicinity of .0011"-.0012" as I recall. And I went with ATF as my spindle oil, the viscosity or thickness falling between spindle oil and dte light. That got me as tight as I dared, and least resistance rolling by hand. End thrust set to .0005". That was in 2017. My caps don't heat up regardless of speed, and on last check I'm still holding those specs, so I'm not wearing anything out. And the ATF still looks cherry. I guess your mileage may vary, but that's where I'm at.

Additionally, slightly off topic. My 1942 2H 16" with cast iron bearings had a hole drilled and tapped on chuck side cap, when I bought it. I added a gits cup to that to pre-lube prior to starting machine. That worked out so nicely, that when I restored a 1943 16", also with cast iron bearings, that I did the same thing:
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Note the gits cup at 12 oclock. I drilled and tapped this one myself. Prior to running the machine, you give the cup in the cap a couple shots of oil, it pre-lubes the spindle bearing. And the excess oil will drip out the little oil level hole of the regular gits cup on the side. In doing this way, I'm presumably pushing the oldest oil toward side cup and out, each time I pre-lube.
 
Thanks for the additional information. Took the caps off and am sending a pic of the bearing and the spindle. Looks like to chuck side of the bearing has some galling in it. I removed both gits cups and flush out the oil area with carb cleaner and put new oil in. I've added about 28 thousands of shims. Going to go for the higher side of the clearance since I am not planning on anything of high tolerances. Spindle appears to be in good shape. Like the idea of the gits cup addition. Where do you get them at?
 

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I used a 1/8" pipe thread. I punched a hole through the top of the cap, then flipped the cap over and used a larger drill bit to chamfer the interior side of the hole a little bit.

Pretty sure mcmaster carr and grainger has new gits at a premium price. I tend to scour ebay for a style I like. Here's one with a 1/8" pipe thread:

I wouldn't worry about the galling. You'll get that on an 80 year old machine. Adjusted, you'll run real nice and true, hold load etc.
 
Got both sides adjusted to close to .002. Should be fine for a greenhorn starting out. Thanks for the help and if your in the area get in touch.
 
I am having a hard time following the schematic, does the T5, T8 and T1 refer to the motor schematics? What other wires are jumped together inside the motor box? Perhaps I just need another cup of coffee and to stare at it longer, wiring is not my strong point.

'T' is typical nomenclature for terminal, though these are often just simple wires on the motor side. You will have to extend 5, 8 and 1 from the motor to the switch. The other wires at the motor should be joined per the 230 diagram on the motor. Note that the diagram was specific to Cad's switch and motor, and may not apply to yours.
 
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If you have a old style drum switch that has jumpers on it, this diagram is the way to wire it. If you use the other diagram in this post and just switch the two lines from your 220 and change the jumpers in your drum switch, it will burn up your motor, which is what happen to mine. See the attached drawing which is for a single phase motor. Leave the old switch as it came if it is a cutler-hammer no. 5441H27A. If you need it with numbered leads I also have a drawing of that.
 

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Cad- I am sorry, are you saying the diagram I provided damaged your motor? What were the symptoms? Do you have pictures of the wiring at that time?
 
Cad- I think your wiring diagram leaves L2 always connected to T1, which is fine as long as you have (and use) another means of disconnect like a plug.
 
I modified the switch as you said and wired according to your diagram. The problem with your info is that you have to switch Red and Black. This is because the start wingdings and the run are separate. The start winding have to drop out after start up. Your diagram does not switch them for rotation and the motor ran but the start windings did not drop out, temp got up to 190 degrees. Kick out the overload but by then it was too hot and the wingdings fried. Motor is gone and not worth re winding
 
"And I went with ATF as my spindle oil, the viscosity or thickness falling between spindle oil and dte light. "

Interesting as this is the first time I've heard of using ATF - good that it works for you but the purists will have a shit-fit about that. My go-to is mobil one synthetic engine oil, 0w20 weight. Again, drives the purists crazy. =)
 
I modified the switch as you said and wired according to your diagram. The problem with your info is that you have to switch Red and Black. This is because the start wingdings and the run are separate. The start winding have to drop out after start up. Your diagram does not switch them for rotation and the motor ran but the start windings did not drop out, temp got up to 190 degrees. Kick out the overload but by then it was too hot and the wingdings fried. Motor is gone and not worth re winding
Hmm, the problem was then not failing to switch the wires, the problem was bypassing the centrifugal switch, or the switch being bad. I've been staring at the diagram on the side of the motor, and I cannot figure out how it could have been bypassed. Are the black and red wires you refer to numbered 6 and 8? (there are no colors on the diagram).
 
The switch is okay. I am using it now with no problems after I put the jumpers back to the original locations, and wired as per the diagram. Are you a electrician? If not do not be giving advice on wiring. The person that made the drawing is a 30 year plus install of factory equipment electrician. Only cost me 320.00 because I made the mistake of using your information.
 








 
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