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Newbie Brake question

swinthrope

Plastic
Joined
Jan 6, 2017
I want to make compound bends in 10 gauge stainless steel and do not need flexibility (i.e. this is likely to be the only shape I bend). I have attached pictures of the part and the part with the die I am hoping to make (in blue) but I have no idea if it is a good idea or not. Most shops have singe v brakes but I don't know if this because of flexibility or because what I am trying to do won't work. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Angles are not critical, I would like to obtain repeatability but the exact angle the parts repeat it is fine withing +/- 2 degrees
 

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How many, how long? Its really more of a stamped part rather than a brake. Roll form is better yet if you need enough feet of the profile.
 
How wide is the part? 2" or 8 feet? That will be the biggest issue.

That part is very simple, especially if you are not worried about exact bends. Calculating a die isn't the easiest when you have to account for spring back and flex.

Depending on quantity, I would bend that in a single Point die for a while. Dies are not really worth making unless that part is 2" wide and you can make it from scraps.
 
the sharp edges aren't a good design.
there is spring back to account for
then you are basically coining which will take more tonnage
widen the top die, add a couple degrees for spring back.
all depends on how long of a part you need to bend? 10ft? any longer is a roll die job. typically....
 
Thanks everyone. Sorry for being an idiot and forgetting dimensions. The width of the part when flat is 10 inches wide and ~15 inches long. Attached is a quick drawing with dimensions. Length dimensions not shown.
 

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Others will have a better idea of exact tonnage required bu that will be a hefty job if you do it all at once. That said, I might be inclined to make a die set to do it as well, if some quantity of parts needs to be done, and you a brake or press with sufficient tonnage. I would probably do this with "exact fit" between top and bottom die parts, just allowing for material thickness and a few thousandths of clearance. Die wear would be an issue if the die isn't hardened, though. Doing the bends one at a time is more attractive if you don't want to spend the time making a die because qty is small.
 
I would build a die to do 2 bends (z bend) then just hit it twice.

This would speed it up, not cost a ton of money by doing all 4 bends and if you don't get the bend you need, it is easy to adjust the die or remake it.

10" long isn't that much
 
Others will have a better idea of exact tonnage required bu that will be a hefty job if you do it all at once. That said, I might be inclined to make a die set to do it as well, if some quantity of parts needs to be done, and you a brake or press with sufficient tonnage. I would probably do this with "exact fit" between top and bottom die parts, just allowing for material thickness and a few thousandths of clearance. Die wear would be an issue if the die isn't hardened, though. Doing the bends one at a time is more attractive if you don't want to spend the time making a die because qty is small.
with how thin and short it is, tonnage is pretty low, single bend in only like 1.56 ton per ft
under 50 pcs is just a press brake job bending each individual. making hundreds of them might need a die set, just split it down the middle to get the adjustment right and shim to fit.
 
16 tons or so. With a CNC press brake maybe a minute or so per part. So 100 parts is maybe 100 minutes. Can you make your die set and produce 100 pieces in 100 minutes?
CNC press brakes are deceptively fast and that is a 2 bend and flip part.
 
I can do a part like that with tooling I already have in well under 30 seconds each. Just do 4 bends with standard tools.

Your die as shown will not do a clean bend on the lower bends. The straight sections of the offset that are unsupported on one side will bow.
 
If your making 10s of thousands of these a custom die could make sense, but anything less than that no way it pencils out. As Strodtkyovy said after setting up a standard die on a brake with a cnc backstop Figure 1hr, you looking at 30 seconds a part to form them. custom die after all the cost making it and proofing it out your going to save what 20 seconds a part? how many parts will you need to make to have that 20 seconds pay back the cost of the die
 
I can do a part like that with tooling I already have in well under 30 seconds each. Just do 4 bends with standard tools.

Your die as shown will not do a clean bend on the lower bends. The straight sections of the offset that are unsupported on one side will bow.
Showoff. Not allowing time to scratch yer nuts and take a piss. I can do 29 seconds without those but why bother.
 
Your die design won't work. Use standard tooling in a brake with stops.
 








 
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