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Newbie - grinding carbide on surface grinder?

I just finished grinding grooves in some carbide rings with an old Norton OD/ID grinder... that was quite the learning experience!
I tried a few different wheels that put a nice shine on the rings but didn't remove any measurable material before I found one that would do the job, .00025" at a time. I'd sloooooowly dial it in, making sure it didn't start ringing too much and let it spark out.
Painfully slow process.

What kind of wheels did you try and what worked?
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I had to rough out some carbide guides I made.I had bought some 4" diamond metal backed tile cutting wheels from Harbor Freight for about $17 for 3 of them years earlier.I have a Baldor carbide grinder and a T&C grinder and diamond wheels for it. I figured that I would save the good wheels for finishing and try the cheap H.F. wheels to remove the bulk of the material.I popped them in the mill and it worked so good that I didn't bother to set up and use the good wheels ,I was able to take .005" doc but backed off to .002".I have made saw guides like that for my DoAll and our Kysor Johnson.just brazed blanks to the steel guides.Those tile wheels will work just fine for that application.I think single wheels are about $8 ea.Just make an arbor.There are plenty of Chinese wheels on E'Bay in the $30 range all styles.Maybe not suitable for production but for occasional use should be fine.
 
I had to rough out some carbide guides I made.I had bought some 4" diamond metal backed tile cutting wheels from Harbor Freight for about $17 for 3 of them years earlier.I have a Baldor carbide grinder and a T&C grinder and diamond wheels for it. I figured that I would save the good wheels for finishing and try the cheap H.F. wheels to remove the bulk of the material.I popped them in the mill and it worked so good that I didn't bother to set up and use the good wheels ,I was able to take .005" doc but backed off to .002".I have made saw guides like that for my DoAll and our Kysor Johnson.just brazed blanks to the steel guides.Those tile wheels will work just fine for that application.I think single wheels are about $8 ea.Just make an arbor.There are plenty of Chinese wheels on E'Bay in the $30 range all styles.Maybe not suitable for production but for occasional use should be fine.

There you have it. NO Chinese wheels unless from a major supplier. Lose the metallic bond wheel. Use resinoid wheels
 
aluminum oxide and "green" stick have been mentionen for cleaning the wheel. which one to choose? doesnt matter? (for resin bonded wheel.)
 
New top brand diamond wheels often come with a stick that looks like a honing stone. Originally they were green (silicon carbide) and now some are white and some black (some are now aluminum oxide). They are also used for CBN wheels.

The stick is pushed to the wheel and removes the bond or structure between the diamonds allowing the diamonds to protrude a bit for better cutting action. I prefer doing this with coolant.
Green wheels can be broken and used for this, but some white wheels broken up often seem a bit hard.

Often with not doing this the diamond wheel will grind much hotter and require more pressure to grind.

The finer grit of a stone made to be a dressing stick would seem to be better than a broken wheel.

https://www.google.com/webhp?source...2&ie=UTF-8#q=dressing+stick+for+sale&tbm=shop
 
aluminum oxide and "green" stick have been mentionen for cleaning the wheel. which one to choose? doesnt matter? (for resin bonded wheel.)

Both work and for some things both are crap.
The "packaged sticks" are never right, just something to use. I throw them away as I've yet to encounter a decent one included with the wheel.
Most sticks in the package are way too hard for me and kill corner rads on the wheel before they open it up or pull too much out and don't "open" the wheel.
We keep 6 grades/grit sticks in stock, some white, some green.
Each has it's use.
The point of the the stick is to peel out the bond without removing abrasive.
So you feed a hard stick light, take a 1/2 inch off a soft stick.
You pour enough stick in to open the bond and the bond may be way different on two wheels.
Some will take only a touch, others a dust storm.
Just like a grinding wheel, hardness and grit size make a huge difference.
All kinds of variations in resin bonded wheels and the stick needs to match it.
I can open a hard 180 wheel with a soft green stick but I'll need to take an inch or two off the stick each time.
A hard coarse grit white stick won't do anything on a 1000 grit copper filled wheel but is wonderful on the 120 grit silicon carbide filled wheel.
Dressing wheels are the same deal.
Bob
 
Carborundum, Norbide, hand held diamond and even the edge of a carbide blade (with care) can be used for dressing a green ,gray, white, blue or pink wheel (yes a aluminum oxide can be other than white) but those dressers should not be used on a diamond or CBN wheel.

Not for dressing but a trick with Norbide... I box in a stick of Norbide in a surface grinder chuck(it is Non magnetic) and with a 100 or 120 grit diamond grind straight across with down feed only to get the dressed diamond finish lines going the length.

That makes a fine line file for corner burring and for the last few passes to knife sharpening.

Then I dress a 1/16 , 1/8 and 1/4 radius to the norbide corners for use in making a loose or rough dressing radius to the surface grinder or bench grinder wheel.. On edge still a sharp corner... Yes I might bump first with the carborundum.
 
Carborundum, Norbide and even the edge of a carbide blade (with care) can be used for dressing a green ,gray, white, blue or pink wheel (yes a aluminum oxide can be other than white) but should not be used on a diamond or CBN wheel.

Not for dressing but a trick with Norbide... I box in a stick of Norbide in a surface grinder chuck(it is Non magnetic) and with a 100 or 120 grit diamond grind straight across with down feed only to get the dressed diamond finish lines going the length.

That makes a fine line file for corner burring and a last few passes to knife sharpening.

Then I dress a 1/16 , 1/8 and 1/4 radius to the norbide for use in making a loose or rough dressing, or a close radius to the surface grinder.. Yes I might bump first with the carborundum.
That's kind of a neat idea. Except of course when I misplace it I will have lost 4 tools instead of 1:D.
 








 
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