What's new
What's new

Non-Planing Jobs on a Plainer

M.B. Naegle

Diamond
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
Curious to see any of your past set-ups, or pictures you've saved from the interweb. Any weird jobs that required odd fixturing, tool holders, etc. How have you or others put these machines to work other than "making things really flat?"

This one's been posted before, but is a good example of some "Plane" ingenuity.

One specific curiosity I have (though I wanted to open the topic up more generally) would be using a planer as a way grinder. Stuff like this:

The concept of building and setting up a monster tool post grinder is straight forward enough, but dust collection would be my concern as so many of these old planers are open way machines with very simple lubrication and often no form of way wipers. I think some kind of spool wound or telescoping way covers would be necessary along with a vacuum to keep the dust under control. Flood coolant would be another help with grinding for heat and dust control, though it would require quite a bit of sheet metal to control it. The "why" of it all would be because actual way grinders are few and far between in the used machine market. IMO actual planing would be best option for steel, iron, and other "soft" metal parts, but being able to grind large hardened pieces like hardened bed ways would be a handy trick to have in the tool box.
 
I’ve set up planers for putting the spiral grooves in mill rolls like the ones in the first film. Only they were chilled iron rolls and we used brazed carbide tools for grooving. The set up was slightly different, the rolls weighed about 6 or 7 tons ( 12,000 lbs plus ) so we had them up in roller vee blocks. The device for rotating the rolls was set up at the side of the machine and we used a sort of dividing head arrangement for pitching out the grooves.

I’ve also set up planers for grinding heads, both like the one in the second film and segmented heads. Coolant was always used. The main problems were two fold - pumping the coolant high enough up to the grinding head and keeping the coolant from swilling over the ends of the bed when the table stroke was reversed.

Regards Tyrone
 
I’ve set up planers for putting the spiral grooves in mill rolls like the ones in the first film. Only they were chilled iron rolls and we used brazed carbide tools for grooving. The set up was slightly different, the rolls weighed about 6 or 7 tons ( 12,000 lbs plus ) so we had them up in roller vee blocks. The device for rotating the rolls was set up at the side of the machine and we used a sort of dividing head arrangement for pitching out the grooves.

I’ve also set up planers for grinding heads, both like the one in the second film and segmented heads. Coolant was always used. The main problems were two fold - pumping the coolant high enough up to the grinding head and keeping the coolant from swilling over the ends of the bed when the table stroke was reversed.

Regards Tyrone
With the coolant, I'd guess running the table slower than is optimal would help keep the waves to a minimum? I'd think it would also be important to have drains at both ends of the table too.
 
Yes, we ran the table slowly, more or less the speed the guy is running at in the grinding video. We had screens set up on the table to try and catch as much of the flying grit/spray as we could. We also had small screens to stop the tidal wave at the end of the stroke.
Obviously planers aren’t set up for lots of coolant as slideways grinding machines are.

Regards Tyrone
 








 
Back
Top