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O.T.: Getting grease off of plastic appliances

gas pumper

Cast Iron
Joined
Jun 19, 2009
Location
Boonton, NJ
On plastic I used a cloth and sponge with the purple power.

On laquered wood cabinets I used the worn scuff pad.

On oak floring, where the finish was already gone, I used a fresh scuff pad to clean the pores of the wood. Where there was existing laquer, the worn pad worked well.

On ceramic tiles I used the scuff pad and a plastic bristle brush for the grout lines.

On Formica I used the scuff pad, but it was already a matte finish.

This stuff did not hurt any of the surfaces I had to clean.

EDIT:
Opps, it's "Super Clean" not purple power. but it's in a purple bottle and it's color is purple.
 
Last edited:

Forrest Addy

Diamond
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Bremerton WA USA
It's plastic and may be delicate. Use the mildest stuff that works. Plain old dish detergent like Dawn on the dish cloth would be a start for me. It may take several applications to get it all but once the goo is gone it's a daily swab to keep it pristine.

Harsh kitchen cleaners are great but they are harsh and may eventually etch or cloud the plaastic. It says right in the instructions of most appliances to use mild soap and water for cleaning plastic parts but - hell - that's would be following instructions; an unmanly behavior.
 

ColoradoBoy

Stainless
Joined
Feb 4, 2001
Location
Hotchkiss, CO USA
I've tried many cleaners over the years but have become
taken with the ability of 70% isopropyl alcohol from the
supermarket on kitchen grease with a cloth rag. Including
stuff that shows up when you pull out a stove after a
few years.

Mixed 50-50 with water is great for stainless appliances
and glass without the cloudy film appearing later from
various specialty 'cleaners'.
 

DaveE907

Titanium
Joined
Sep 18, 2007
Location
Spanish Springs, NV
The Purple Power did not damage PLASTIC surfaces?

X2 gas pumper

It did not when applied and removed with cotton terry cloth wipers, sponges, brushes and the Norton version of Scotch-Brite non-woven no abrasive nylon scrubber. The entire circa 2000 black microwave with plenty of plastic got the treatment, inside and out. Really inside, the whole thing was disassembled and rendered spotless.

Most of it was done with 10:1 Purple Power, the concentration was stepped up as needed to address the goop problem at hand. The stuff goes a long way.
 

J. Randall

Stainless
Joined
Jul 29, 2003
Location
Vici Okla. U.S.A.
I am going to guess that you cook with a lot of canola oil or canola based product. This stuff is nice and slick, but gets real gooey and just impossible to remove when it sits on a surface and ages I use canola as a cutting fluid for turning and drilling copper, but the machine gets all gooed up if I do not clean it up right, and have had this on my range knobs as well as my wife is a canola oil user to make her southern fried chicken

I used to suggest "baby oil' but was correctly corrected that it is mineral spirits, so I bought a quart of mineral spirits - cheaper than little 12 ounce baby oils..... This works on my machines and the knobs of my stove and even the front of the microwave when applied with a soft cloth. Have even cleaned off gunk from my gray door handles in the car with it.

My wife prefers the lavender baby oil though it is really mineral spirits, but she likes the smell, and when SWMBO is happy, so am I.

You were either incorrectly corrected, or you incorrectly quoted your correct correction, baby oil is mineral oil, not mineral spirits.
James
 

gwilson

Diamond
Joined
Oct 1, 2006
Location
williamsburg va
Follow up: My wife got some Purple Power,and it is doing a good job WITH lots of elbow grease. At least it didn't attack the plastic. Thanks to all for the help.
 

Akbarjan

Plastic
Joined
Nov 26, 2022
The first step is to remove the control knobs from the stove. Most models will have screw-on knobs, so simply unscrew these and set them aside. If your model has push-button controls, you will need to consult your stove’s manual for instructions on how to remove these. Once the knobs are off, you can soak them in a bowl of hot, soapy water while you tackle the rest of the panel. Use best grease no local brands
 

Big B

Diamond
Joined
Jun 26, 2009
Location
Michigan, USA
The first step is to remove the control knobs from the stove. Most models will have screw-on knobs, so simply unscrew these and set them aside. If your model has push-button controls, you will need to consult your stove’s manual for instructions on how to remove these. Once the knobs are off, you can soak them in a bowl of hot, soapy water while you tackle the rest of the panel. Use best grease no local brands
It looks like he got his microwave clean about 11 years ago but welcome to the forum anyway.
 

akajun

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jul 1, 2011
Location
Brusly, LA
As long as it’s not in the cooking part and just the outside
Wd40, I shit you not. Spray, let sit a few minutes then wipe with a rough cloth. When done spray with normal kitchen cleaner like 409 and clean as normal
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
I know it's an old thread but for anyone with the same issue I would recommend a mix of Dawn and hot water or even Simple Green and hot water. For a final finish and to reduce future accumulations use Jubilee Kitchen Wax according to the directions. It's a cleaner and a wax and can get off the final stubborn crud the other stuff doesn't get..
 

Joe Gwinn

Stainless
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
Boston, MA area
I have to disagree with Conrad about using Bar Keeper's friend on plastic. It is great stuff, but it is pretty aggressive. If I were going to use a powdered product on plastic (and I wouldn't) I'd try Bon Ami, which is gentle enough not to scratch glass. Make a paste of the powder, wet the surface to be cleaned with water first, then apply the paste with a wet rag, very gently. But I'd test in an inconspicuous area.
Do NOT use Bon Ami on plastic. It most likely will badly scratch the surface.

Bon Ami is a cleanser like Comet, only using crushed Feldspar as the abrasive, not Silica. Feldspar is softer than Silica, but both are harder than most plastics.
 

tomjelly

Stainless
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Location
GA
Purple power sprayed full strength warm on a warm surface will dissolve even most baked on (but not charred) commercial cooking grease after removing any thick layers with a paint scraper or spatula. It works even better when scrubbed with a brush or scotchbrite. Will not harm plastic but will degloss or even remove some paints and will very quickly corrode aluminum if not rinsed off immediately. Use rubber gloves, rinse your skin if it sprays up on you and wear safety glasses if using a brush. If cleaning a spot you can't wash down to rinse, wipe dry, dry with a blow gun then wipe down with water and repeat a few times. I've reclaimed commercial restaurant cooking equipment so filthy it should have headed to scrap this way. There is one type of oil I was never able to remove, and that's the oil used by some places in making some hot dinner rolls, the soft ones served in a basket before ordering. It was impossible to remove from a dough divider I ended up with once, very much like contact cement. I have a ton of different solvents here and NOTHING would take it off. I figure whatever that stuff is surely must be an artery clogging nightmare so I've never eaten those since!
 

Joe Gwinn

Stainless
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
Boston, MA area
That recalcitrant oil has completely converted to a varnish. Might be one of the edible oils used for seasoning cast iron cookware.

A Methylene Chloride (DICHLOROMETHANE) based paint stripper, like traditional 5f5, will likely work, and won't dissolve aluminum. It still appears to be the real stuff, but be sure to read labels, to ensure that the stuff currently available hasn't been reformulated to avoid VOCs like Methylene Chloride.
 








 
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