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Options for making repeatable, precise bends in flat bar?

I bought the bender parts and cylinder from Hossfeld and sourced my own pump, solenoid, etc. The cylinder is an odd length, so buying theirs ensures it will work properly with all of the tooling. I went with a solenoid valve and foot pedal to keep hands-free operation. The majority of the hydraulic parts came from Northern Tool and I was able to package everything so it could be self contained in the bottom drawer of my cabinet. The attached photo is before it was complete, but shows how all the plumbing, etc. is laid out.
That looks super nice! I like how you've made it mobile and tucked it away into a drawer. Did you use SAE straight fittings for the tubing, or something else? If not too much trouble, can you share pictures of it completed with the control connected?

Also, does your hydraulic setup include a limit switch that you can mount to the bending circle on the main frame?
 
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Thank you!

The fittings are #6 JIC (3/8" tube) with tube nuts and sleeves. Here is a photo of the complete setup. I did include a limit switch for doing repeat work. It will be especially handy when using the feed-along tooling for large radius stuff.
 

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Thank you!

The fittings are #6 JIC (3/8" tube) with tube nuts and sleeves. Here is a photo of the complete setup. I did include a limit switch for doing repeat work. It will be especially handy when using the feed-along tooling for large radius stuff.

That stand looks awesome. Definitely the nicest stand I've seen since I've been looking into getting a Hossfeld. You thought of everything. I like how you've included the inlet receptacle for power, and the panel mount jacks for the other connections on the front of the drawer. What type of jack and connectors are you using for the foot pedal (and, I'm assuming, for the limit switch)?

If you wanted to use the hydraulics in your Hossfeld cart/stand not just for the Hossfeld, but for another shop machine (i.e., press brake), too, is there a hydraulic quick connect fitting that would allow you to easily disconnect the hydraulic hoses at the the panel on your Hossfeld cart and connect up hoses from another hydraulic machine to the connections on the panel? Something that wouldn't leak hydraulic fluid everywhere? Or would you have to use a manifold and keep both machines connected to the manifold at all times?
 
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That stand looks awesome. Definitely the nicest stand I've seen since I've been looking into getting a Hossfeld. You thought of everything. I like how you've included the inlet receptacle for power, and the panel mount jacks for the other connections on the front of the drawer. What type of jack and connectors are you using for the foot pedal (and, I'm assuming, for the limit switch)?

If you wanted to use the hydraulics in your Hossfeld cart/stand not just for the Hossfeld, but for another shop machine (i.e., press brake), too, is there a hydraulic quick connect fitting that would allow you to easily disconnect the hydraulic hoses at the the panel on your Hossfeld cart and connect up hoses from another hydraulic machine to the connections on the panel? Something that wouldn't leak hydraulic fluid everywhere? Or would you have to use a manifold and keep both machines connected to the manifold at all times?

Thank you! I also have a JD2 bender and I did the usual thing for that where all of the tooling hangs on bars welded to the stand. There are so many more small pieces with the Hossfeld stuff that it made sense to keep it all in drawers. Things got a little out of hand when I couldn't find a tool box of the dimensions I wanted to build around...

I'm using Deutsch connectors for the electrical, other than the twist-lock for the power cord. The point was to be able to remove and stow all the cords when it's not in use.

There are hydraulic quick connect fittings that include a check valve so they leak minimal oil. I did not do that in this case. I did splurge on swivel 90 degree fittings where the flex hoses connect to the cart. Spendy...but they let me keep the length of the hoses to a minimum and prevent the fittings from trying to loosen from the movement of the cylinder relative to the cart.
 
If you wanted to use the hydraulics in your Hossfeld cart/stand not just for the Hossfeld, but for another shop machine (i.e., press brake), too, is there a hydraulic quick connect fitting that would allow you to easily disconnect the hydraulic hoses at the the panel on your Hossfeld cart and connect up hoses from another hydraulic machine to the connections on the panel? Something that wouldn't leak hydraulic fluid everywhere? Or would you have to use a manifold and keep both machines connected to the manifold at all times?

Thank you! I also have a JD2 bender and I did the usual thing for that where all of the tooling hangs on bars welded to the stand. There are so many more small pieces with the Hossfeld stuff that it made sense to keep it all in drawers. Things got a little out of hand when I couldn't find a tool box of the dimensions I wanted to build around...

I'm using Deutsch connectors for the electrical, other than the twist-lock for the power cord. The point was to be able to remove and stow all the cords when it's not in use.

There are hydraulic quick connect fittings that include a check valve so they leak minimal oil. I did not do that in this case. I did splurge on swivel 90 degree fittings where the flex hoses connect to the cart. Spendy...but they let me keep the length of the hoses to a minimum and prevent the fittings from trying to loosen from the movement of the cylinder relative to the cart.
Great idea on the swivel fittings! I know what you mean by "pricey" ... I replaced all the copper on my IR compressor with Parker fittings and hoses (and added on an aftercooler) and it was extremely expensive, but worth every penny.

Did you flare the steel tubing, or use something like Ferulok or Ermeto fittings from Parker?

Did you purchase the JD2 after you bought the Hossfeld? Just curious if you find the JD2 better at some aspect of bending than the Hossfeld, and if you feel like you need both to accomplish all that your work demands in your shop?

Thanks again for sharing your cart/stand and info about it. It is making me want to go with a hydraulic setup from the start .... I don't yet have the skills to replicate your setup, but it is definitely inspiring me to try to incorporate some of your great ideas if I do attempt to build my own.
 
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The hard lines are flared stainless with standard tube nuts and sleeves. Nothing fancy.

I had the JD2 for about 15 years before I got the Hossfeld. It is better for larger tube (1-1/4" and up). I got the Hossfeld because I was doing prototype work for a client that required a bunch of odd bends in flat stock. It excels at that, and I've continued to pick up other tooling to do things I can't do with the JD2.
 
Regarding the outfeed table thing, if you have a long end out in free air already bent, put a level on it and a super light infeed table under it. The level is key to getting a flat frame. Without it you will always be pulling the last bit down to meet the rest before welding. Not that that's such a big deal.

Regarding the Hossfeld/American thing, some of the tooling looks quite different from the 2 companies, but I think they work about the same. And I bet you if someone is selling an American Bender it's going to say Hossfeld in the subject header. I'm quite sure that American is hyperaware of what goes on at Hossfeld and vise versa.

One problem I have with my Hossfeld is I've read so many of Ries's posts I start to think I know something, LOL. It's fun to google "Hossfeld Ries" and spend an hour or so reading.

metalmagpie
 
I would seriously check out American Bender's hydraulic setup. I use it with an original Hossfeld power pack. The main advantage to the American setup is that you can bend 180 degrees in one stroke, it does take up more room than the Hoss setup. We only use the hydraulic for bending large steel, or any stainless tubing. When bending stainless it is best to have one fluid motion so as to not work harden the material. We used to make a lot of boat rails and used the hydraulic a lot, time and customers changed and we current keep the hydraulics separate from the bender.
 
I would seriously check out American Bender's hydraulic setup. I use it with an original Hossfeld power pack. The main advantage to the American setup is that you can bend 180 degrees in one stroke, it does take up more room than the Hoss setup. We only use the hydraulic for bending large steel, or any stainless tubing. When bending stainless it is best to have one fluid motion so as to not work harden the material. We used to make a lot of boat rails and used the hydraulic a lot, time and customers changed and we current keep the hydraulics separate from the bender.

I reached out to them for pricing more than once and they never got back in touch with me. Out of business, possibly? When I contacted Hossfeld about pricing they replied to me within 30 minutes. The promptness (or lack thereof) says a lot about both companies, IMO.
 
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Thanks to all those who took the time to give a newbie to the world of metal fabrication feedback, suggestions, and insight on metal bending. I ended up purchasing the Hossfeld and a couple of their die kits. Can someone tell me what is all that black residue that's on it? It's like a grease of some kind, and it's completely covering the bender and dies. How do I get that stuff off, and what should I treat the Hossfeld with to keep it from rusting?
 
My guess is that the black layer you are seeing is a side effect of heat treating. The few new Hossfeld parts I have ordered I haven't bothered to change anything. I just use them. Nor do I worry much about rust. My bender and stand and most of my tooling were quite rusty when I got/made them. They have been wire brushed to a brown patina and that is fine with me.

If you like, bead blast your tooling and then wipe it down with linseed oil. Inside, that will prevent rust for many years. Occasionally give them another oil wiping. I had a small welding table I kept outside. Once a year I'd scrub the rust off of it and wipe it down with (boiled) linseed oil. After a few years it stopped rusting and just stayed brown.

metalmagpie
 
My guess is that the black layer you are seeing is a side effect of heat treating. The few new Hossfeld parts I have ordered I haven't bothered to change anything. I just use them. Nor do I worry much about rust. My bender and stand and most of my tooling were quite rusty when I got/made them. They have been wire brushed to a brown patina and that is fine with me.

If you like, bead blast your tooling and then wipe it down with linseed oil. Inside, that will prevent rust for many years. Occasionally give them another oil wiping. I had a small welding table I kept outside. Once a year I'd scrub the rust off of it and wipe it down with (boiled) linseed oil. After a few years it stopped rusting and just stayed brown.

metalmagpie
Thanks, I'll start keeping linseed oil in my shop. I wasn't aware it could penetrate steel, and have shied away from using it on my wood projects for the potential fire hazard it poses.
 
Thanks to all those who took the time to give a newbie to the world of metal fabrication feedback, suggestions, and insight on metal bending. I ended up purchasing the Hossfeld and a couple of their die kits. Can someone tell me what is all that black residue that's on it? It's like a grease of some kind, and it's completely covering the bender and dies. How do I get that stuff off, and what should I treat the Hossfeld with to keep it from rusting?

The black residue is some sort of rust preventative...I'm guessing asphalt based. It will come off with use or wiping with LPS-2 or WD40 or similar. I keep my Hossfeld tooling coated with Fluid Film when I'm not using it to prevent rust.
 
The black residue is some sort of rust preventative...I'm guessing asphalt based. It will come off with use or wiping with LPS-2 or WD40 or similar. I keep my Hossfeld tooling coated with Fluid Film when I'm not using it to prevent rust.
Thanks for the info Graham!
 








 
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