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OT: aging and decluttering

Well, you're supposed to finally be able to travel! That's right...you can sit in congested airports waiting on delayed flights, stay in nasty hotels around the globe, pay exorbitant prices for food, and suffer all the incoveniences of not being home. That's my dream, anyway.
I did all that when I worked for DN. Hotel "continental" breakfasts, lines at airports and rental car counters, lost luggage... I *really* hate aviation and traveling that way.
Hello, GibbsCam..? :D
 
This is an interested thread. I have a question for all you "geezers". When do you quit working in your shop and decide its time to clear out? As Forrest mentioned, he doesn't get into the shop like he used to, but when do you judge the time, "Ok, its done", time to settle the accounts and clean out the shop? Do you just stop going in there much, or you start looking at the law of averages when you go into your 70s?

At 46 I don't see myself stopping anytime until I am dead, but the reality is there will be a day when I realize, hopefully, its time to hang up the gloves and clean out the shop.
At 59, I can't quit for at least another 30 years. But really, I don't want to. As long as I can safely get along, I'd go in every day until the day comes they find me slouched over the Kennedy roller cabinet.
 
I'm 65 and I'm only just getting to the point where I can use my workshop to do useful things in. I've still got to improve the flatness of the 36" x 48" surface table from .000112" to "WTF" and then to rebuild the surface grinder. Then I've got some mode tools to build. I'm not sure if I'll ever get to make any of the projects I've got lined up...
 
My friends in their 80's slowed down and stopped caring about their shops when their spouses died or their cognition declined to the point they couldn't do what they'd always been doing.

About 8 years ago my thyroid stopped working. It was a terrifying experience to lose 90% of my intellect and energy for a couple years. I got most of it back with the right treatment and diet, but I contemplated shutting it all down and selling it off as I just couldn't use my shop anymore.

I'm 40 and I'd like to be done making parts by 55. I enjoy it, but I don't want to spend my later years in the shop.
 
I did all that when I worked for DN. Hotel "continental" breakfasts, lines at airports and rental car counters, lost luggage... I *really* hate aviation and traveling that way.
Hello, GibbsCam..? :D

Ugh I am <so> done with flying, but alas my wife loves to travel so I guess I can man-up for it. She's making noises about Australia next year- thats just too f'ing far and too much b.s, I think I'll tap out on that one. This Sept its Croatia, which plenty too far already. But I guess its good to be able to complain about going on trips with one's wife.

But as for the shop, when I can't move the machines around anymore then it'll be time. So the ATW will be the 1st to go, then the Bridgeport, then the Nichols. Naturally the lathe is in the back of the shop lol. My dad is giving me his South Bend 9" and mill-drill when he closes up his shop so at some point they'll get a promotion- and no concerns about hassle getting rid of machines like that.
 
I've found myself becoming increasingly less sentimental about my shop and other stuff as I get older. It would be nice if my clock restoration tools and equipment ended up with someone who cares but I think what really matters is not leaving too much of a mess for whoever has to deal with all my 'precious' crap.
 
my gpap had general machine, auto machine and garage from 1920 to 1986. quit 91+ died 92. i have some of his auto machine equip (kwikway)
i'm 71 still working but by myself by choice now
dirt bike racing buddy texted me last night. when should he quit (younger than me) looking for advice
don't have any. do as you want. me still do
my son died 11-21. no one to want my shit now. so i guess who cares when i'm gone but i will use as long as i can.
 
... lost luggage...
A friend of mine use to work in one of the UK airports looking after VIP customers as they transferred between flights. His job was to be efficient and unobtrusive and make sure that their every requirement was satisfied without comment or delay. He said that most were fine, and some were lovely. A few were particularly rude and arrogant, and it it was remarkable to see where some of their luggage eventually turned up.

George
 
Great to see you Forrest. I just had a conversation with my mentor Benji the other day. At 85 he has decided it is time to enjoy the beautiful NC mountains and turn his shop over to his children and grandchildren. He said it is very tough on him since he has been machining since before he came to the US from Germany. What I learned from him at our normal job we worked together pales in comparison to what I learned when he allowed me to come to his house and into his personal shop. At 49 i know I have a finite amount of years left, hopefully I can stay healthy enough to work until i'm Benji's age. Who knows. Time is the one thing we machinist can't make.
 
At 59, I can't quit for at least another 30 years. But really, I don't want to. As long as I can safely get along, I'd go in every day until the day comes they find me slouched over the Kennedy roller cabinet.
My set-up guy is 60 and said he wants to work as long as his body will hold out. He feels if he retires he will just sit at home and die.
 
Ugh I am <so> done with flying, but alas my wife loves to travel so I guess I can man-up for it. She's making noises about Australia next year- thats just too f'ing far and too much b.s, I think I'll tap out on that one. This Sept its Croatia, which plenty too far already. But I guess its good to be able to complain about going on trips with one's wife.
I'm fortunate, that my wife enjoys day trips and short vacations locally. The Jersey Shore is only an hour away.
But as for the shop, when I can't move the machines around anymore then it'll be time. So the ATW will be the 1st to go, then the Bridgeport, then the Nichols. Naturally the lathe is in the back of the shop lol. My dad is giving me his South Bend 9" and mill-drill when he closes up his shop so at some point they'll get a promotion- and no concerns about hassle getting rid of machines like that.
I hear you. As long as I can press Cycle Start or move the PC mouse, I think I'll be ok.
 
I don't see how you can get rid of the "hobby" machines etc. at all until you either get so incapacitated you cant operate them or you die, because there is always the small job around the house that needs just a bit of something. The wife came home Friday from her job at school (she's 85 and still at it) and told me she needed a bunch of "door stops" (those wooden wedges). So I look through the wood scrap and find a chunk of 2 x 6 and slice a bunch off on the radial arm saw for her. Things like that sort of preclude getting rid of the machines even if I don't do "real" projects any longer. I'll admit those "scrap piles" are getting too large though. :-)
...lewie...
 
I posted this once before somewhere. I plan on keeping my machines until the end. The sale of these machines and the proceeds are not factored into necessary retirement income. When I croak, if none of the kids or grandkids want anything, I told my wife call the junk man, open the garage and let them take it all away.
 
Forrest: Happy birthday. It's amazing, I could have written your posting myself since I am just 4 months older than you. You have made better progress than I in downsizing. I haven't made much of a dent in mine, but need to. I, am also in decent shape but for knees that bother me some. Listening to you gives me inspiration to renew my efforts.
James Clark
 
This is an interested thread. I have a question for all you "geezers". When do you quit working in your shop and decide its time to clear out? As Forrest mentioned, he doesn't get into the shop like he used to, but when do you judge the time, "Ok, its done", time to settle the accounts and clean out the shop? Do you just stop going in there much, or you start looking at the law of averages when you go into your 70s?

At 46 I don't see myself stopping anytime until I am dead, but the reality is there will be a day when I realize, hopefully, its time to hang up the gloves and clean out the shop.
For me it wasn't a sudden decision. My legs slowly deteriorated until eventually my shop time doing productive work faded to zero. I still have a strong impulse to make and create and my tiny brain seethes with future projects and my shirt pocket bulges with sketches and scribbled calculations.

I realized I had to reduce my collection before I kicked the bucket if only to save my family from months of sorting identifying and realizing what value they could while circled by something for nothing scavengers. Besides, I wanted to ensure it went more or less intact to a younger man of talent who will benefit from it.

In the meantime, I gratify my creative/making impulses with cooking - a worthy skillset and passtime to challenge any man while yielding a direct and tasty benefit for his family and friends
 
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In the meantime, I gratify my creative/making impulses with cooking - a worthy skillset and passtime to challenge any man while yielding a direct and tasty benefit for his family and friends
Yes it is sir. I would still be a single man if I couldn't cook. Lord knows it wasn't my looks or money that attracted my wife.
 
Yes to as ll of the above.
I will sing you happy birthday in the marylin monroe style.

I am just turning 70 and have been faced with mortality more and more. Mine and others. Over the last 12 years I have gotten rid of a large house and its contents, a nutty marriage, a dead business and so on. All my material possessions art in my studio except for yayak, bike. And clothing which are in my gf house which we share all expenses for. Which are minimal. I retired and can easily live on my social security but have plenty of savings to fall back on.for other things. On one level I have never been happier.
My will has an attachment with a list of my studio with.suggested selling prices and other details.
I have a 1 inch binder with banking info, passwords etc. I encouraged my kids to do this. When my daughter passed recently, all of accounts, union info, investment accounts, car info, were in one place, far easier,.
After my father retired at 62. They lived in a nice place in Florida and traveled alot and so on. By the time my mother died 8 years ago there posession boiled down to her furniture in her assisted living apartment, some heirlooms and 6 file boxes with dad's family tree reseach and a file folder with their banking and snd so on and a large bin of photos. Their was some nice jewelry and China and silver that was given to specigic heirs. All the siblings took what they wanted.
Instead of a wake. We had a party for mom when we knew she only had a couple of weeks left. A real Irish wake, where everyone had fun and drank and sang. (Fitzsimmons] .That was the best things we have ever done as a family.
My point is that it feels good to let go of things that are going anyways. I think our culture encourages otherwise. And sometimes it is painful .


plp
 








 
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