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OT: Artemis launch tomorrow, have parts on it...pretty excited

That is way cool! Congratulation.

My father in law was an engineer with Grumman for many years and had designed parts that were on both the LEM and the space shuttles. My wife's initials are engraved in one of the window frames on the LEM from Apollo 13.
HEY!!! I know you! :D (edit: the Welding Web forum)
 
It would be interesting to know how many PM members have worked in one way or another to make this launch happen. It is scheduled for 2:17 EDT today. Fuel is now loading.

For those who would like to see locations of suppliers for this program (every state has at least one) here is a map link: Artemis Partner Locations There are also many European and a few Canadian suppliers shown. My guess is that the map shows contract provider locations and not every nut, bolt, and tubing supplier who contributed bits to the program.

For those who wish to follow progress leading up to launch and see live video fromm NASA, here is a link NASA Live

Good luck, Plastikdreams. Thanks for starting the thread.

Denis

A few minutes ago one of these quick disconnects was leaking hydrogen. According to the NASA feed, engineers stopped the hydrogen, flushed the disconnect with helium which "reseated" the seal and all is well. These things must be finicky as I think it was a hydrogen leak that scrubbed the mission last time. Maybe I could loan them a couple of compressed air disconnects from my shop ;-)
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It would be interesting to know how many PM members have worked in one way or another to make this launch happen.

I'm pretty sure our company has stuff on this vehicle. We do lots of stuff for NASA and SpaceX, as well as Earthlink (shit-ton for them).
Good luck to all who are involved directly with this project.
 
We are not on the list, mainly because we don't provide a finished part we send raw castings to another large company who deals with the rest of it.
 
Just curious about the current pucker factor when it scrubbed for H2 leak.

I don't care if it scrubs 50 times... I'm glad they're doing things like checking for H2 leaks. I know some manager from Spacely Sprockets is shouting to get that think off his launch pad, but bursting into flames half way through the mission is never worth it.
 
Oh well, things could be worse. Let's look on the bright side:

View attachment 373283

“NOAA-N Prime after falling over during construction, on 6 September 2003.
On 6 September 2003 at 15:28 UTC, the satellite was badly damaged while being worked on at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems factory in Sunnyvale, California. The spacecraft fell to the floor as it reached 13° of tilt while being rotated. The satellite fell as a team was turning it from a vertical to a horizontal position. A NASA inquiry into the mishap determined that it was caused by a lack of procedural discipline throughout the facility. While the turn-over cart used during the procedure was in storage, a technician removed twenty-four bolts securing an adapter plate to it without documenting the action. The team subsequently using the cart to turn the satellite failed to check the bolts, as specified in the procedure, before attempting to move the satellite.[23] Repairs to the satellite cost US$135 million. Lockheed Martin agreed to forfeit all profit from the project to help pay for repair costs; they later took a US$30 million charge relating to the incident. The remainder of the repair costs were paid by the United States government.[24]

I did not know about this incident until you posted it. This was pretty negligent work! Uggh!

Denis
 
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It would be interesting to know how many PM members have worked in one way or another to make this launch happen. It is scheduled for 2:17 EDT today. Fuel is now loading.

For those who would like to see locations of suppliers for this program (every state has at least one) here is a map link: Artemis Partner Locations There are also many European and a few Canadian suppliers shown. My guess is that the map shows contract provider locations and not every nut, bolt, and tubing supplier who contributed bits to the program.

For those who wish to follow progress leading up to launch and see live video fromm NASA, here is a link NASA Live

Good luck, Plastikdreams. Thanks for starting the thread.

Denis

A few minutes ago one of these quick disconnects was leaking hydrogen. According to the NASA feed, engineers stopped the hydrogen, flushed the disconnect with helium which "reseated" the seal and all is well. These things must be finicky as I think it was a hydrogen leak that scrubbed the mission last time. Maybe I could loan them a couple of compressed air disconnects from my shop ;-)
View attachment 373165
I'm kinda surprised they aren't using a knife-edge seal with a copper gasket. That's the only thing I can think of that I'd rely on for a quickly disconnectable hydrogen seal.
 
My father was the designer of the Apollo Saturn V rocket engine fuel pumps. They required 55,000 HP to run providing 3 tons of fuel to the engines each second. Prior to this he worked at Hamilton Standard in Connecticut from 1958 to 1961 who were designing the fuel pumps for the X-15. Once the X-15 was done he was told in 1961 you can either get layed off or move to California and work at Rocketdyne who was building the Saturn V rocket engines. In 1966 the the engines were done and he lost his job again and vowed to never work in aerospace again! By the way all calculations were done with slide rules. He never had access to a computer.

Somewhere I have pictures of his time at Rocketdyne. One I remember was four rail tank cars full of liquid oxygen (124,000 gallons total) were sent to Edwards Air Force base to run a test engine. One tank cars brakes overheated and the venting oxygen caused a fire. He was sent to investigate. There was nothing left. The tank cars, railroad tracks and all surrounding buildings had vanished. Even the concrete the buildings sat on had vaporized.

His brother was vice president of Grumman who built the lunar landing module. His brother was also the cheapest son of a bitch I have ever met!

They are both long since dead now so I can't ask any questions.
 
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I would like to see a mirror of sorts that could reflect enough sunlight to map/examine the moon's back side. Designing a drone that could fly in the moon's almost non-extant thin atmosphere would be cool so to map the back side.
Most likely easier to give the moon a moon... that is to say, a satellite that could orbit the moon. It could pass pretty low. Not sure how long it would last but should be long enough to get it well covered.
Most of the money spent goes to USA jobs so into worker's pockets.
Doesn't ALL the money spent by governments go into someones pockets somewhere?
Rare earth elements retrieval might even make moon harvesting valuable.
The tricky part is getting it back in some concentrated and useable form. Hurling piles of rocks or refined piles of rocks at the earth from the moon could be awkward.
 








 
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