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OT: CRC brake cleaner - safe on rubber bellows / rubber accordian, plastic , acrylic?

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
Need to clean some machines. Mostly raw metal or painted metal, but some plastic parts, acrylic and rubber bellows and washers.

CRC Brake clean is safe to use ? Product Data Sheet and Safety Data Sheet is not saying what materials to NOT use on.

 

DSM8

Plastic
Joined
May 22, 2018
I know for a fact on certain plastics is does cause some deformation almost like a solvent
Not sure on what type of plastics but it has happened to me on other things
 

Laverda

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Location
Riverside County, CA
CRC pro series brake cleaner is tetrachloroethylene which is a nonflammable solvent. If you take your clothes to a dry cleaner in the USA this is what is most commonly used for fabric cleaning as it disolves body oil and many other organic compounds.

It is also used in paint remover and many other products.

It will attack some plastics. As you most likely don't know what type of plastics you are cleaning you need to test it on a small area.
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
I bought the regular / original CRC brake cleaner. Will it attack the paint on machine tools? Suppose I will have to test on a small spot to find out.
 

GregSY

Diamond
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Location
Houston
Mineral spirits. Or, most people don't realize the local coin operated car wash is an excellent starting point for cleaning an old, greasy machine. It uses organic water, with eco-friendly detergents, along with high pressure to remove paint and grease. Rest easy.....once you leave, the car wash attendants will carefully empty the drains using solar-powered pumps and run the dirty water through a series of filters after picking out any larger pieces with their hands. The debris is sent to a certified recycling center for re-use in things like animal and human food products and flavored condoms. The water is used to irrigate hemp plants, which are harvested and used to keep the populace as complacent as possible. It's the Life Cycle at work.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
I would suggest a mixture of Simple Green, water, and isopropyl alcohol. I've used it for all kinds of things including vinyl siding and rubber parts and never had an issue.

One of the gentlest cleaners I know of is a 70/30 solution of isopropyl alcohol and deionized water. This was what was listed on the lab wipes we used for general cleaning including computer keyboards and various instruments and surfaces. I believe the 70% isopropyl alcohol from CVS is pretty close.
 

BT Fabrication

Stainless
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
brake cleaner isnt great on unknown rubbers, or plastics as it can cause them to become brittle or the rubber to swell if its not epdm.
 

BoxcarPete

Stainless
Joined
Nov 30, 2018
Location
Michigan, USA
For rubber, only Kalrez, Teflon, and Viton are safe from tetrachloroethylene. EPDM will immediately swell like crazy because it's a non-polar molecule. Only the fluoronated polymers tolerate it. Now that I'm thinking about that, Fluorosilicone does OK, but you probably aren't looking to spray brake cleaner at anything made from fluorosilicone.

For plastics, polyethylene is listed as "immediate damage" and I can tell you acetal will not like it because it's chlorine.
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
I have mineral spirits, simple green, denatured alcohol, acetone, lacquer thinner, goo gone.

Anyone have experience with Zep's industrial purple degreaser or their heavy duty citrus degreaser?

On the Purple degreaser, the container states it is for " heavy machinery, tools, engine parts "


 

dana gear

Hot Rolled
Joined
Feb 27, 2013
Location
Northern califorina, usa
New formulation non chlorinated CRC does not clean for beans. May as well use Cool aid
The old Chlorinated stuff eats some plastics and rubbers and in some cases paint.
It's also dangerous to weld on anything cleaned with old formulation CRC, creates a dangerous gas.
 

car2

Stainless
Joined
Sep 19, 2009
Location
Apex, NC
Isopropyl or ethyl alcohol works best for removing old congealed or hardened oil, even better than mineral spirits, and even acetone. It won't harm the paint or plastics. Hand-sanitizer (IPA or ethyl alcohol + glycerin) works great---slather some on, let it sit for a minute or two, brush with soft brushes for paint, brass brushes for metal, wipe off...don't laugh, give it a try. Those caustics will attack paint unless used sparingly, as will of course strong solvents like acetone, toluene, lacquer-thinner, even denatured alcohol (which contains contaminants such as acetone to poison it).
 

Machinist_max

Aluminum
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Hot water pressure washer..... I do understand the fear or water, but its just so easy with a hot water pressure washer.
 

mattthemuppet

Hot Rolled
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
Location
San Antonio
not entirely sure what it was, but after my wife washed my trousers with my flip phone in them my uncle gave me a spray can of "cleaner/ water displacer" and said to give it a good spray. So I did. Then my phone literally disintegrated into two large pieces and lots of small pieces.

Not a super helpful anecdote for sure, but from that point on I am very careful what I spray on what. I didn't even like that phone, but I liked have to buy a new one even less.
 

Laverda

Cast Iron
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Location
Riverside County, CA
I do agree with using a pressure washer. My Lathe and mill were both cleaned this way. Do it on a hot summer day and the water will be gone fast. Also after washing, spray WD40 everywhere. Any of the important electronics are hidden out of way and won't get wet.
 








 
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