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OT- having a deep freezer exposed to outside temps.

Well you definitely want to avoid an automatic defrost freezer, which needs to live in an environment that doesn't go below freezing. Auto defrost also degrades your food much more rapidly than a plain old deep freeze.
 
only issue I see is mice like to build nests near the motors/compressors to keep warm. Put out tons of rat poison, keep an eye out for droppings, strange noises, etc. I knew one old guy that made a hardwire cloth basket box that it sat on /in to keep them out, he did have it in a barn though.
 
The big freeze,,,, that cracks me up.
The cold weather wasn't that bad, I've seen worse. The problem is that the idiots that run our state's power grid have decided that we need to start using wind and solar for power, rather than something that works. We were without power for the better part of three days during which the temperature never got above 20°. We had gas that we could burn in the fireplace, and gas stove in the pool pump house/outdoor kitchen, so that was OK. The problem was keeping the water well going and other pipes from freezing without electricity. I've got a generator now that can handle that stuff.

BTW, over 200 people died as a result, many tried to stay warm in their cars and were asphixiated.
 
only issue I see is mice like to build nests near the motors/compressors to keep warm. Put out tons of rat poison, keep an eye out for droppings, strange noises, etc. I knew one old guy that made a hardwire cloth basket box that it sat on /in to keep them out, he did have it in a barn though.

I'm also think making a small mesh fence to out around the bottom. Make it out of the cage material that has 1/4" square holes in it.
This should keep leaves out too.
 
The cold weather wasn't that bad, I've seen worse. The problem is that the idiots that run our state's power grid have decided that we need to start using wind and solar for power, rather than something that works. We were without power for the better part of three days during which the temperature never got above 20°. We had gas that we could burn in the fireplace, and gas stove in the pool pump house/outdoor kitchen, so that was OK. The problem was keeping the water well going and other pipes from freezing without electricity. I've got a generator now that can handle that stuff.

BTW, over 200 people died as a result, many tried to stay warm in their cars and were asphixiated.
Your big freeze was all over the news in Canada, I felt sorry for you guys. Up here we are so used to power failures, caused by weather or just shitty chink components used in the grid that everyone has either backup power, or at the very least a backup heat source. I always keep enough diesel here to keep everything going for at least a week when the lights go out
 
Biggest concern will be the warm ambient temps in the summer. Domestic units are sized to operate in climate controlled spaces.
If in direct sunlight or has southern exposure it will struggle to hold temperature and basically run 24/7 . Cold weather is Ok, the suction pressure will drop to the compressor but the colder ambient will compensate for the reduced efficiency.
 
Biggest concern will be the warm ambient temps in the summer. Domestic units are sized to operate in climate controlled spaces.
If in direct sunlight or has southern exposure it will struggle to hold temperature and basically run 24/7 . Cold weather is Ok, the suction pressure will drop to the compressor but the colder ambient will compensate for the reduced efficiency.
It's in the North side of our house fully shaded .
Would it be better to have a fan blowing on it when the temps get around 100°?
The manual says it's garage rated to 110°.
Also, it says the garage rating has it sealed against critters and bugs.
 
The cold weather wasn't that bad, I've seen worse. The problem is that the idiots that run our state's power grid have decided that we need to start using wind and solar for power, rather than something that works. We were without power for the better part of three days during which the temperature never got above 20°. We had gas that we could burn in the fireplace, and gas stove in the pool pump house/outdoor kitchen, so that was OK. The problem was keeping the water well going and other pipes from freezing without electricity. I've got a generator now that can handle that stuff.

BTW, over 200 people died as a result, many tried to stay warm in their cars and were asphixiated.
Was the result of frozen water and gas lines, oh and a nuke went down
Blame your regulators for not following federal guidelines for how to run a power plant.
Little to do with wind power
On Topic, I wonder if some[more modern] freezers won't like starting up in very low temps, everything being designed just so and all.
Good point about the defrosting freezers, they freeze up even next to the furnace
 
You might want to check the owners manual. I have a small refrigerator in my barn and the instructions very clearly say "Do not leave in a place where the temperature will go below freezing".
A standalone freezer will usually be fine. The issue with a fridge/freezer is that they ofter don't have a thermostat in the freezer compartment. The freezer just gets chilled whenever the fridge does. Unfortunately, that means that if the temperature outside is 36 degrees, the fridge thermostat never turns on and your freezer melts.
 
don't have a thermostat in the freezer compartment.
Uh, back up a min...you can't freeze by regulating the fridge.....
The freezer on the majority of domestic units has a thermostat for the freezer, it takes priority.
Most units then have a cold control for the fridge which may be nothing more than a door that opens from the freezer compartment.
This is on a side by side.........Top/bottom can be the same air door style
Exceptions: some units have true dual controls.....and there are other ways to regulate temps...
 
Uh, back up a min...you can't freeze by regulating the fridge.....
The freezer on the majority of domestic units has a thermostat for the freezer, it takes priority.
Most units then have a cold control for the fridge which may be nothing more than a door that opens from the freezer compartment.
This is on a side by side.........Top/bottom can be the same air door style
Exceptions: some units have true dual controls.....and there are other ways to regulate temps...
I'm no appliance expert on thermostat location; but that's what I've read and experienced. I don't recall where, but here are a few sources


We have an old fridge at camp and last fall I didn't clear out the freezer before things got cold. Everything in the freezer melted, which matches up with what the articles say.

Higher end fridges are probably better, but this is an old top-freezer unit.
 
Back when my parents lived in northern Montana, they had a big freezer in an unheated building for storing the Elk my dad would hunt. The coldest they had seen when they lived there was 38 below zero. The freezer had no problem. It probably never even ran the entire winter.

The biggest problem was mice who would try to find somewhere to spend the winter by chewing and destroying everything.
 
Back when my parents lived in northern Montana, they had a big freezer in an unheated building for storing the Elk my dad would hunt. The coldest they had seen when they lived there was 38 below zero. The freezer had no problem. It probably never even ran the entire winter.

The biggest problem was mice who would try to find somewhere to spend the winter by chewing and destroying everything.


That was also a big worry for me.
This one has a belly pan that is attached all the way around the bottom. There's no room around the cord for anything, it's a metal plate bulkhead.
On the end it has a grille with small slots.
I'm still going to put a screen around it at the bottom to keep leaves and large insects away .
 
Ya don't have bears there ? We/ve had bears bust garage windows to get to the freezer inside .
I put a new passenger door window in my truck a year back cause I left a candybar in my console . Fortunately only the window was broken . Don't know how he got the console open without ripping it up .
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Yes they had bears, black and grizzles. The building was cinder block with a steel door so they could not get in. The big bear problem was the grizzle bears knew what day trash pickup was and you could not put you trash out at night or it would end up all over the street in the summer. Winter no problem as they were hibernating.

Still they were nothing compared to what mice can do when they find a warm car engine compartment and decide to eat the wiring harness and everything else. They are able to get in to places you would think was impossible.
 
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Yes they had bears, black and grizzles. The building was cinder block with a steel door so they could not get in. The big bear problem was the grizzle bears knew what day trash pickup was and you could not put you trash out at night or it would end up all over the street in the summer. Winter no problem as they were hibernating.

Still they were nothing compared to what mice can do when they find a warm car engine compartment and decide to eat the wiring harness and everything else. They are able to get in to places you would think was impossible.
Mice destroy everything.
I've seen people's storage buildings burnt because mice were chewing on the wiring.
They get in electronics, and stored automobiles and ruin everything, then they pee everywhere.
I tell people I don't mind black snakes, etc. they keep the mice population down.
 
Yeppers , a lot of times there's no comeback from mice damage . I've seen machined surfaces completely destroyed from them . They also love to steal the insulation from under yer dashboard for nest's . We don't even eave the chicken or bird food out any more .
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