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OT NEUROPATHY SUFFERERS - FOUND ANY TREATMENT THAT HELPS?

Richard King

Diamond
Joined
Jul 12, 2005
Location
Cottage Grove, MN 55016
I have Neuropathy and I am sure others here must have it too. My feet and toes are numb and now my pinky fingers is getting numb too. I bought some boots that have "red lights" in them that were advertised on Amazon and I got took....I see on the net they are advertising a pad you stand on and it shocks your nerves...also sounds like a scam like the red lights. Has anyone tried anything that works? Thanks....

I also broke my shoulder and am learning to re use my muscles that tightened up for the month my arm was in a sling. I cant make a fist...sucks getting old!
 
I have had numbness and tingling in my feet and thighs due to back problems for almost 20 years. Never found anything that helped out. Keep stretching that arm. If you don't you'll have more problems.
 
I have an autoimmune disease that has countless exciting side effects.

The best treatment I have found is diet.

Remove all sugar, all alcohol, all caffeine, all dairy and all processed food of any kind.
Do you cheat much? I know it works because I've done it and do it, but it sure as hell makes for a
boring life. Who can resist a bit of ice cream in summer?
 
I have Neuropathy and I am sure others here must have it too. My feet and toes are numb and now my pinky fingers is getting numb too. I bought some boots that have "red lights" in them that were advertised on Amazon and I got took....I see on the net they are advertising a pad you stand on and it shocks your nerves...also sounds like a scam like the red lights. Has anyone tried anything that works? Thanks....

I also broke my shoulder and am learning to re use my muscles that tightened up for the month my arm was in a sling. I cant make a fist...sucks getting old!
See if you can find a really good Chinese doctor, preferably accredited in western and Chinese medicine. I can vouch for their knowledge after they saved my life in China. I'm not talking about those dispensing rhino horn etc.
 
Do you cheat much? I know it works because I've done it and do it, but it sure as hell makes for a
boring life. Who can resist a bit of ice cream in summer?

Sometimes it's easy, sometimes it's hard. I cheat, then I pay the price and I try harder to stay on track for a bit.

I think the holidays are the hardest to eat right. So much good food. And I can't have gluten so at family stuff people take it upon themselves to bake stuff gluten free special just for me. Then I feel super obligated, cave and dig in.
 
Richard, if you have diabetes then diet, excercise, and medication to get your average level of glucose down (they measure A1C, but its sugar-coated hemoglobin, and they use it because it indicates your average better than fasting or postprandial measurements) are the first suggestion. Rather than take specifics here (one man's meat is another man's poison) check in with a diabetologist and a neurologist. If you can drive your HbA1c down a point it may lessen the neuropathy. Exercise will help improve your metabolic flexibility. This is your body's ability to go from rapidly storing glucose and fat after a meal to releasing those stores when you have fasted for a while. But see a real doc, one who does a real exam and interview, and gets real tests ordered. I'm not a medical doctor.
That said, my research (which is my job) suggests that reducing hyper-refined foods helps improve metabolic flexibility and helps lose weight. See Dr. Kevin Hall's work (he's a tenured researcher at the NIH).
 
Do you cheat much? I know it works because I've done it and do it, but it sure as hell makes for a
boring life. Who can resist a bit of ice cream in summer?
It’s like the old joke -
The doctor has just prescribed a diet like the one mentioned above. The patient says - “ If I do this doc will I live longer ? “ The doctor replies - “ No, but it’ll certainly feel like it “.

Regards Tyrone
 
I won't claim any of this will work for you, in addition to my not having an overt signal I'm right on my own behalf. But, the TREND for me has greatly improved over 4 to 5 years, so, for whatever it's worth:

I had a mild case of neuropathy diagnosed in my left leg about 7 years ago from a bad case of cellulitis that flared up when I tore a leg muscle. The leg swelled up nasty, and it ended up damaging some of the nerves. Went to an oriental doc who stuck me with needles hooded up to electronics and confirmed that.

I had a collapsed disk go about 4 years ago, I couldn't get out of bed for 20 minutes, but when I finally made it upright it was the single, worst pain I've ever felt, like a white hot knife jammed into the small of my back. I was flat against the wall screaming, when I realized my right leg was, by itself, lifted an inch off the floor and the whole leg was on fire. My legs weren't working right for almost a year, and the first three months after I was afraid of dropping to the ground because I'd never get up.

It took a year for the nerves to come back to normal and my right leg muscles started working normally again.

Two years ago I started waking up, every single morning for months, with hip/top of the leg on the side pain. Enough it was waking me up.

Having said all that boo-hoo, I'm doing really well nowadays. I just need to lose another 80 lbs then go from there. Overall the things I changed in my lifestyle that I believe folded all together so the body could "fix itself":

1) I lost 30 lbs
2) I cut out 90% of the sugar I consume. And I mean I check every damn thing I buy. Once in a great while I'll have a cookie or a piece of candy, but I've gotten good at keeping that rare.
3) I cut out the vast majority of Carbohydrates I consume. This is a tough one, because every damn thing we buy is packed with that. So, that's a big hit on what I let myself eat. I'm stunned at the amount of carbs in stuff I've always eaten, but ignored that.
4) I'm NOT avoiding Fats, but I use discretion and check what types of fats are in something, etc. I'm not afraid to eat cheese, butter, bacon, steak, but I do pay attention to not overdoing it of course. I'm sort of on a Keto-light wannabe diet.
5) I'm taking COD LIVER OIL once a day (teaspoon) at lunch. I attribute the disappearance of my night-time hip/leg pain to that. I did some reading, figured it couldn't hurt to try it based on the claims of what it supports in the body, and dang two weeks after starting that regimen the leg pains stopped. After months of it being consistent, two weeks after taking cod liver oil one teaspoon a day it went away and has stayed gone.
6) I eat more fish, but I'm selective. Salmon mostly. I stay away from fish that are . . . questionable . . . in their health benefits. Research is required here.
7) I drink WATER almost exclusively. I had one kidney removed. But, once I had my body/mind trained (took a year) to not be terminally bored with water, it's great now (really). Once in a while I supplement with: Coconut water (electrolytes), Carrot Juice (relatively low sugar, tons of vitamin K or A I think), Prune Juice (small servings to mitigate sugar, and it's high in minerals).

I believe all of these things combined have led to significant improvements in my legs, leg swelling (now way, way down), ligament/joint pain (pretty much gone now), and return of function of my legs and feeling numbness/discomfort.

Not claiming I'm a doctor. Just my experience and sense of what's been going on with me.

Best of luck to you.
 
Rich I too am diabetic. (type 2) You have to treat carbs especially sugar like its poison. I started to get Neuropathy in my feet and it was a real wake up call. I have had success getting rid of all sugar and almost all carbs. I have also found a soak in a hot tub a couple of times a week does a lot of good.
The US health care system runs on Sugar. The hospital food programs push it with every meal. It's good for business. Keeps people coming back.

The biggest joke in my 4 day stay in ICU (while I got my 5 stents) was the food they brought me because I was on the "heart healthy" diet. One morning, hash browns, mashed potatoes, and an English muffin with assorted little packets of candied jellies. Oh,and canned peaches swimming in liquid sugar sauce. I kept refusing to eat most of what they brought. At one point a group of nurses came in, concerned I wasn't eating the food (GF was bringing in real food). They asked "what can we bring you" and I said "A couple hard boiled eggs for some protein" to which there was a resounding round of laughter.....followed by "You CAN'T have them on your diet"! Completely clueless? Maybe not...
 
Rich I too am diabetic. (type 2) You have to treat carbs especially sugar like its poison. I started to get Neuropathy in my feet and it was a real wake up call. I have had success getting rid of all sugar and almost all carbs. I have also found a soak in a hot tub a couple of times a week does a lot of good.
I love baths but with the broken shoulder - its impossible to get in and out. I've considered getting a walk in tub, but a realtor said it would decrease the house value....i will cut back on the sugar....but I love Brownie Blizzards.....sighhhhhhhh..lol
 
The US health care system runs on Sugar. The hospital food programs push it with every meal. It's good for business. Keeps people coming back.

The biggest joke in my 4 day stay in ICU (while I got my 5 stents) was the food they brought me because I was on the "heart healthy" diet. One morning, hash browns, mashed potatoes, and an English muffin with assorted little packets of candied jellies. Oh,and canned peaches swimming in liquid sugar sauce. I kept refusing to eat most of what they brought. At one point a group of nurses came in, concerned I wasn't eating the food (GF was bringing in real food). They asked "what can we bring you" and I said "A couple hard boiled eggs for some protein" to which there was a resounding round of laughter.....followed by "You CAN'T have them on your diet"! Completely clueless? Maybe not...
I had two surgeries recently and spent a total of 16 days in the hospital. The food was amazing . Basically fast food. Even the jello wasn't even real jello [ie collogen] but jelled koolaid. Ie no collagen just sugar.
 
I had two surgeries recently and spent a total of 16 days in the hospital. The food was amazing . Basically fast food. Even the jello wasn't even real jello [ie collogen] but jelled koolaid. Ie no collagen just sugar.
I try not to be cynical but it looks like you are right.

I find lidocaine spray helps with the foot discomfort
I was doing ok with the carbs until my intestinal surgery and had an ostomy bag for 3 months. I lost 32 pounds and couldnt eat enought to keep my weight up. So I developed some bad habits.
 
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.i will cut back on the sugar....but I love Brownie Blizzards.....sighhhhhhhh..lol
Rich, the bastard thing about sugar is it makes you hungry, and hungry for more sugar. IF you can cut 99% of it out, and maintain that for 2? 4? weeks, suddenly the cravings taper off. You will be less hungry in general. Of course you have to eat real food while stopping the sugar. Way less carbs as well. You might be amazed at how much better you feel when your body gets a break from dealing with so much carbs and sugar.
 
A few years ago, I went hardcore (sort of) keto for a few months. The method was called "carb night" and the idea was to go 7-10 days at a time with 30g of total carbs or less per day (but below 10 was preferred), and let loose for one night, eating all the crap you're supposed to avoid at all cost. I'm talking brownie blizzards are in, krispy kremes are in, load up on all the sugar you can. The idea was to periodically shock the system with insulin or something like that, so it's probably not suitable for diabetics of any kind.

But the point is that during the week, even broccoli began to taste sweet. It's amazing how you adapt to the diet you have. Highly refined sugars all the time make some really gnarly adaptations to your body :(

Edit to add: It's not just "your" body, per se. A lot of research is going into just exactly how important all the gut bacteria are to your digestion. It's one of the things that determine how well tolerated a lot of things are. There are some people who have legitimate reactions to gluten and dairy for example, but for the rest of the folk for whom those foods simply "don't sit well" it's more likely nothing to do with the actual human's digestive system at all. This can be changed over time. A buddy of mine spent 8 months in Korea where they don't really have dairy, and he was lactose intolerant when he got back to the states. Unwilling to give up on the true source of happiness (dairy fat), he brute forced his gut biome back into compliance, abusing quite a few toilets in the process.
 
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I've been a type 1 diabetic for 58 years now. Long term raised blood glucose and associated poor blood circulation at the peripheries are what Kills the nerves. It's pretty well irreversible. Good blood glucose control will stop it from getting worse.

Currently lying in a hospital bed in England, broke my ankle at the Start of July. That's Healed up nicely with the aid of some titanium plate and screws. Got an infection in it this week and I'm now on an antibiotic drip...

It's a struggle to get a low carb meal with the Choices here too. The meals, by default, each have more carbs than I normally eat in a day.
 
A few years ago, I went hardcore (sort of) keto for a few months. The method was called "carb night" and the idea was to go 7-10 days at a time with 30g of total carbs or less per day (but below 10 was preferred), and let loose for one night, eating all the crap you're supposed to avoid at all cost. I'm talking brownie blizzards are in, krispy kremes are in, load up on all the sugar you can. The idea was to periodically shock the system with insulin or something like that, so it's probably not suitable for diabetics of any kind.

But the point is that during the week, even broccoli began to taste sweet. It's amazing how you adapt to the diet you have. Highly refined sugars all the time make some really gnarly adaptations to your body :(

Edit to add: It's not just "your" body, per se. A lot of research is going into just exactly how important all the gut bacteria are to your digestion. It's one of the things that determine how well tolerated a lot of things are. There are some people who have legitimate reactions to gluten and dairy for example, but for the rest of the folk for whom those foods simply "don't sit well" it's more likely nothing to do with the actual human's digestive system at all. This can be changed over time. A buddy of mine spent 8 months in Korea where they don't really have dairy, and he was lactose intolerant when he got back to the states. Unwilling to give up on the true source of happiness (dairy fat), he brute forced his gut biome back into compliance, abusing quite a few toilets in the process.

I have found that Kefir (traditional eastern european/russian fermented milk drink) works wonders for me with regards to digestion and lactose tolerance.

As I've gotten older (43 now) I've become quite lactose intolerant, and I've suffered from acid reflux/indigestion my whole life. A couple of years ago I was recommended to try kefir by a russian friend, and discovered that 2-3 500ml bottles a week is plenty to completely cure both, and I feel generally better as a whole.

Typical supermarket products that are supposed to serve a similar purpose (Yakult, Actimel etc.) don't seem to do much of anything for me.
 
It's hard to believe I'm telling this, but what the heck. I have discovered Walgreens brand stool softener + stimulant Laxative helps me go. after the surgery and lack of exercise causes me to have issues. 2 to 4 pills - 2 times a day helps a lot.
 








 
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