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OT - New TV for 97 year old in assisted living

Hide everything but the on off buttons.
Perhaps a secondary universal remote with some functions deleted. Or certain buttons removed/disabled. I've seen that done with cell phones so they can be handed out to drivers so they can receive business calls but not make personal calls.
 
TV, Roku, Wifi and YOUTUBE!

The first two will cost you but there is no avoiding that. The home is providing the Wifi so that is free.

And YouTube has a LOT of old movies for FREE, with commercials.

I have exactly that combination and can watch streaming TV in any room of my house where I care to. I have about a half dozen of the Roku Express devices that cost only about $35 or $40 each (one time expense) and they work with any TV. I even have an old CRT type TV in my garage shop so I can listen, more than watch whatever I want while I work. The Roku Express devices also work with many other streaming services, including most cable company feeds. So I have cable with only one cable box (they require paying for one) but can still watch cable at all of my TV/Roku locations.

Roku plus Wifi puts TV with virtually all streaming services at any location where the Wifi reaches. I am even thinking of building a battery powered unit that I can just carry around. Back yard, driveway, front porch wherever!

And I understand that Roku has a voice activated remote now, but I haven't tried one yet.



Any smart TV paired with a Roku device will get you what you need. I prefer the Roku device as I think the "smart" side of the TV is usually a POS.
 
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This will not end well. Granny will never comprehend buttons on a remote and sorry, but she will screw it up in a heartbeat. Even if instructions are written down for her she just can't see the buttons.
My 92 yo mother in law screws hers up weekly. Fortunately I made written out instructions for wifey to get it working again.

Get a VHS or a DVD player and she can stick in whatever she wants. I know a lady that is a lunatic for movies and she buys DVD movies for 1 or 2 bucks and she must have 100 of them. Video store sell offs, Redbox sell offs, resale shops etc. That physical hold it and put it in a machine method is the only thing that is feasible for the elderly.
 
If you go with a Roku device, when you do the WiFi setup there is only a place for a password, not a userid and password which is what you have with a public network. I put up a write up on the Roku Community support pages to help with this. You need to get the MAC Address on the setup page and then contact the computer folks at the facility and have them add that device so no password is required. Yes, it is a challenge for some older folks, my Mom keeps calling me because she can't follow the instructions to go from HDMI 1 to HDMI 2.
 
My grandmother, 97, is on hospice and in an assisted living facility. All she wants is to watch movies from her time. I know nearly nothing about this subject, and the quantity of choices in TVs is overwhelming.

The assisted living facility has wifi, so what I'm hoping for is a TV up to 40" that can hook up to wifi and play movies from netflix or amazon prime, both of which we have for our home already. The simpler the better.


Re: the actual TV:

From our experience with same, we had issues with my G-ma pushing wrong buttons on the remote by accident, and the TV switching to another INPUT channel, and her getting the blue screen of death until someone came to fix it.
My G-ma was all but blind the last, and couldn't actually see the remote (nor the TV for that matter - but she would listen to it) but not already having the understanding of the INPUT channels made it basically impossible for us to get her to understand what she needed to doo to try to fix it herself.

I don't have a clue if there is any way to get a TV that wouldn't change INPUTs via the remote or not.
I wish that I could tell you the brand of her TV - not to get that! But I don't remember...

This was actually an issue for the TV, even tho she only had the DISH control. But her TV was on bad frequencies anyhow. For whatever reason, she ended up with a remote control window A/C unit, and the Dish remote would turn it on and off, so I traded her units as I had one just like it as a control cabinet A/C unit, but mine had manual controls.

I'm only 3 years ahead of you on this.

Good luck!


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
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Is voice command an option? A quick google shows most of the top mfgs have it, but only in smart TVs. I also see accessory voice remotes, don't know how well they integrate.
I was real skeptical about voice controlled devices, I refuse to get an Alexa. I was forced to give up my old Comcast cable DVR through obsolesence and switch to a DVR that required me to use the voice commands to have full control of it's capabilities. So I learned to use it. I now like it. And it's eerie how well it works. It even understands my commands when I mumble them through a mouthful of food. I don't even try to be clear anymore. I've tried to trick it and only succeeded once so far.
The only buttons I use now are the power button and the Return to Live buttons, And I probably don't need to, I just have that habit.
Just FWIW. Might solve a problem. There's lots posted about them on the www.
 
Polling the staff: With constant turnover in the facility, this is kind of moot. But I'll ask.

"Magic Remote": The last thing this old lady needs is some stranger waving a magic wand in the air and making the black box do things. She's struggling with reality as it is.

Speech recognition: I figure this would be pretty bad too, since there's quite a bit of talking in the room, making for false activations just like our stupid Alexa, always listening in... Besides, Grandma is pretty much a mute at this point, so she won't be able to use speech recognition either.

I've found some TV's that come with a remote that have buttons for netflix and amazon prime, among others. That's the way I'm leaning, and then build lists of movies to pick from like Larry suggested above.
Our Sony has those very buttons. Very easy to use.
 
As far as channel selection, especially since you say that she may or may not be able to handle the remote herself, what about just having the TV set on AMC or some other channel dedicated to old movies?

AMC hasn't come on my package possibly since Primestar? Not sure if it ever came on [our] Dish or not?
That seemed like a super channel at that time, with a host that would tell interesting trivia at breaks and whatnot.
Or maybe that was Ted Turner channel? Either way ... we haven't gotten it a LONG time, but I would think that just a cpl of channels like that would be fine? Maybe you can just subscribe to those online w/o having to buy a whole pkg of "57 channels and there's nothing on".


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
You only need to enter a password ONCE in a Roku Express. It stays active forever, or at least for years.

Did I mention that Roku has voice operated remotes now. They cost a bit extra, but grandmother may handle that better than the buttons.



If you go with a Roku device, when you do the WiFi setup there is only a place for a password, not a userid and password which is what you have with a public network. I put up a write up on the Roku Community support pages to help with this. You need to get the MAC Address on the setup page and then contact the computer folks at the facility and have them add that device so no password is required. Yes, it is a challenge for some older folks, my Mom keeps calling me because she can't follow the instructions to go from HDMI 1 to HDMI 2.
 
ONE MORE TIME:

ROKU EXPRESS has an available VOICE REMOTE!

It is on sale now at $25 and will work with ANY TV that has the proper input (HDMI would be best). Oh, and another great feature that I was not aware of is it will turn ON and OFF a TV that has the needed feature for that. One remote for TV and streaming - how great is that.




Is voice command an option? A quick google shows most of the top mfgs have it, but only in smart TVs. I also see accessory voice remotes, don't know how well they integrate.
I was real skeptical about voice controlled devices, I refuse to get an Alexa. I was forced to give up my old Comcast cable DVR through obsolesence and switch to a DVR that required me to use the voice commands to have full control of it's capabilities. So I learned to use it. I now like it. And it's eerie how well it works. It even understands my commands when I mumble them through a mouthful of food. I don't even try to be clear anymore. I've tried to trick it and only succeeded once so far.
The only buttons I use now are the power button and the Return to Live buttons, And I probably don't need to, I just have that habit.
Just FWIW. Might solve a problem. There's lots posted about them on the www.
 
You only need to enter a password ONCE in a Roku Express. It stays active forever, or at least for years. ...............

Yes, but if you are on a public network, like in a retirement home, you have to enter a Userid AND a Password to connect. The Roku setup screen does not have place to enter a Userid, only a Password. Thus the need to use the MAC Address per my write up on the Roku Community support pages.
 
Speech recognition: I figure this would be pretty bad too, since there's quite a bit of talking in the room, making for false activations just like our stupid Alexa, always listening in...
Out of curiosity I did an unscientific test with my remote. I turned a youtube video up loud, turned the radio up loud held the remote near them and pressed the button. All I got was "I didn't get that" or nonsense on the screen. Pressing the button and speaking directly into the remote as the instructions state still gets good results. They seem to have this one developed pretty well.
It only listens when the button is pressed.
 
I clearly didn't explain the situation well enough, although I thought the words 'hospice' and 'near vegetable' would have sufficed.

She is non verbal most of the time, bed ridden full time and can no longer manage to use her tablet for anything. The movies are just an attempt to keep her mind off of her impending death.

She is now asking for specific movies, so now I'm sure that DVDs are the way to go. That way the staff can just pop in her requested movie and hit play.
 
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I've got a friend who works at a nursing home.
She's a young thing. Lots of young women work at nursing homes around here...CNA's... "certified nurse aides".

Ask one of them for their opinion on what grandma should have in the home to make the most of the ... they will know how to get the most bang for the buck... they don't make diddly squat for wages, so they're used to making the most out of
....She is now asking for specific movies, so now I'm sure that DVDs are the way to go. That way the staff can just pop in her requested movie and hit play.....
Don't waste money on the dvd's... .get her a "redbox" subscription, or something similar, I'd say. (Truth in advertising... I don't have one... I just saw somewhere that you can get Redbox on line... as a subscription, instead of physically going up there and getting a physical DVD.. and, anyway... who has a DVD player any more?

Leave it to the young women who work at the Home... .they're poor and have to scramble to make ends meet... they'll have kids and will know which service to get... which ones are liable to have any video you can think of "on tap"...
 
She is now asking for specific movies, so now I'm sure that DVDs are the way to go. That way the staff can just pop in her requested movie and hit play.
What movies? I'll look to see if anything is left from mom's DVDs. They're yours if I have them.
 








 
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