What's new
What's new

OT: slab jacking with grout.

heres what I used just this weekend...awesome stuff...we even had a flood and road and pool was under 4 feet of water and washed the road out...but speed crete held

speedcrete.jpg
 
My trouble is I have a shed built on top, and it's leaning... and I need to straighten it up and stabilize the slab so it will not crack. I can't just add thickness to level the top.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 
Hey All,
I am the distributor in Illinois and Indiana we can help you with jacking this shed or a solid foundation for Decks, Room Additions, Garages, Houses, Storage Sheds, Barns, Metal Buildings, Docks, and larger projects like Boardwalks. Do you have heavy equipment that needs to be installed, we can help by adding additional load capacity to slab floors? Helical piles are perfect for supporting heavy equipment and manufacturing machines...

Techno METAL POST Illiana LLC - Illinois and Indiana Helical Piles - Screwed galvanized steel piles, solid and durable. Free and fast submissions.

Seems like everyone and their brother is getting into screw piles these days. We have an outfit up here that does this, with the identical green machines... this isn't even "school grade science" either. Doug could rent a mini-excavator with an auger attachment and make an adapter/screw pile (glorified pipe) in short order.

My question RE: slab jacking is how do you direct the pressure? Assuming equal exertion in all directions. You'd need to make a containment shield of some type?
 
I had this done 4 years ago, driveway is 18' wide 40 long, divider down the center. Dropped about 2" over 15 years. just in the upper left corner, sidewalk had settled towards the house as well.

They sounded the concrete with a iron bar and marked areas where they said there were voids. Drill 1" holes 3-5' apart around the voids. None near the edges, only a couple in the sidewalk.

The material was fine sand, bentonite, and a little cement. About like Pudding in viscosity. Pump put out 800PSI (label on pump) a rubber cone was stuck into the holes, there was a plate around the cone for a couple guys to stand on, to hold it in.
As the stuff was pumped in the slab moved up, and sometimes the grout would come out another of the holes. The process took about 3 hours with cleanup and all.

There was a guaranty that the slab would not drop more than 1/2" in a year, and it didn't, but now at 4 years its about a inch lower than level.

Its only that area of the driveway that has moved in 20 years.

Be sure to inject far from the edges first, when the sideway was done the stuff was coming out all over, as it was only 4' wide.
 
My trouble is I have a shed built on top, and it's leaning... and I need to straighten it up and stabilize the slab so it will not crack. I can't just add thickness to level the top.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

Did you end up making a grout pump? If so please tell us how you did it.
 
Sorry, kinda late to the party.

Think the whole problem through but first do the math. You need to understand the numbers before you commit to an enterprise. 14' x 14' x 2" wedge of installed (assuming no voids or subsidence to fill) = 28,224 in³.


What's the stroke of your cylinder? How many strokes will it take to raise (actually tile) the slab 2"?


Do you have a way to quickly refill and cycle your cylinder?


Will your slab act like a piston and tilt or will the grout leak out around the edges?


Is your slab strong enough to be raised as a single unit without cracking or breaking into two slabs?


Check with the slab jacking outfit to see what you can do to minimize his time on the job for example clear out the whole area, pre-drill the jacking holes in the array he requires, walk the slab edge to spot likely leak sites, run out water hoses, dig a pit he can flush his equipment into, ready an easy access to the job, etc. Attending to all the petty details will shorten the jacker's time on site.


Remember, this is a very small job. Most of the cost will be in show-up and clean-up. The actual work of jacking will probably take less than an hour.


You might make a pump that will work for a few cycles but will it pump 16 1/4 cu ft (plus voids and leakage)?


Will your pump reliably pump abrasive grout and the valves open and close for - what: 40 to 80 strokes?


Will your water system deliver the GPM needed to expeditiously move the grout?


Can you stop it for a few minutes to clear a blockage without the grout stiffening in the pump?


Hoses?


Injector fitting?


I'd hire the pro because he has proven equipment and experience and will warrant his work.


Design/build a rudimentary grout pump system is a big bite to chew. You literally have to re-invent the wheel. It can be done by a bit of reverse engineering but your labor and the material used in making it may be lost because chances are you will wear it out using it once. Maybe your finances and requirements dictate the DYI approach. Regardless I wish you good luck on your enterprise.
 
Problem with this kind of jacking is that if the substrate isn't compactable or improperly compacted, the floor will continue to sink after grouting.

Toms Wheels noticed....
 
There are additives you can add to the concrete mix to make it slower to setup and also ones to make it more fluid with out weakening it like adding more water would. These may help give you more time to play around with your slow homemade equipment. Who cares if it takes an extra day to cure.
Bill D.
 
Don't forget you will need to pump enough grout to fill the groundhog den. That may take more grout than raising the slab.
 
I've been raising concrete professionally for 30 years. There are a lot of things not mentioned in this thread. We get a lot of calls from people who try to do this themselves, break the concrete, mess the job up, and then ask to be rescued. it's a couple times a month.

There's a lot more to it then a slow pumping DIY hand pump, I can tell you that.

Have fun.
 
I've been raising concrete professionally for 30 years. There are a lot of things not mentioned in this thread. We get a lot of calls from people who try to do this themselves, break the concrete, mess the job up, and then ask to be rescued. it's a couple times a month.

There's a lot more to it then a slow pumping DIY hand pump, I can tell you that.

Have fun.

So then why don't you offer some advice right here & now ?

Every slab jacking place I tried won't return calls for a simple sidewalk job.

So we are forced to doo it ourselves.
 
I've been raising concrete professionally for 30 years. There are a lot of things not mentioned in this thread. We get a lot of calls from people who try to do this themselves, break the concrete, mess the job up, and then ask to be rescued. it's a couple times a month.

There's a lot more to it then a slow pumping DIY hand pump, I can tell you that.

Have fun.

Right, so you come here and glean up all the freely given advice from career machinists, welders and mechanics but you're not going to share and help with a subject being discussed when you actually have the opportunity. Instead you just want to deride and tell everyone they're doing it wrong and bound to fail. You're a class act.
 








 
Back
Top