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OT: Straightening wire shelf sockets

Forrest Addy

Diamond
Joined
Dec 20, 2000
Location
Bremerton WA USA
A little FYI for my friends. Not that they'd ever need it.

I favor wire shelving. It's sturdy, modular, easy to clean and revise, standardized across the whole industry, etc. I bought a new unit that had taken a bump in shipping. A corner socket was deformed making it impossible to assemble with the plastic split tapered sleeves that grip the columns.

As it happens, the taper in the sockets is a precise fit on a #4 MT shank, 1/2" short of the gage line. Heat and bash using an old drill shank for a drift and bada-bing! The deformation is gone. If yours is powder coated, buff off the coating and rattle-can spray it after the work is done.
 
very nice info Forrest.

A guy could chop up some old MT-4 drill bits, and drill a hole thru them.

Placed nose to nose, a piece of all thread and some nuts should pull them together nicely.
 
Good to hear from you again Forrest. I'm relatively new here but I enjoy reading your posts in the archives.

Hope you'll be hanging around for awhile......:cheers:
 
Thanks Forrest. It makes sense that rather then invent a new taper, and need to have custom tools made, they choose an existing taper so they can buy off the shelf tools. Do you think they formed or drilled the socket?
Bil lD
 
Thanks for that info, I use tons of that style shelving. Anyone have tricks for taking it apart? I've found a shot of PB helps, yet have run into more than a few that will not break free. Board across the corner, beat with hammer, and the wire just bends.
 
Thanks for that info, I use tons of that style shelving. Anyone have tricks for taking it apart? I've found a shot of PB helps, yet have run into more than a few that will not break free. Board across the corner, beat with hammer, and the wire just bends.

Never had a socket lock that badly for me, but if you've got plastic wedges then a decent shot of freeze spray (for electronics diagnosis) might work - shrinks the plastic faster than the steel.
 
I have a ton of these shoulder height shelves on wheels and 3 or 4 of the shorter waist high rolling carts with ball bearing slide drawers. They're awesome. I've got a sort of rolling shelving library area in the basement. The shelves are rolled in tight next to each other, when I need access I roll the shelf out that I want to get into, then back in afterward.

My girlfriend gets jobs to decommission electronics (modems, registers, computers etc.) in stores that are closing. She did 4 or 5 Famous Footwear stores and each one had 6-8 of the big shelves and 1-2 of the carts. They were throwing them in the dumpster. I put a stop to that real quick.
 








 
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