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Peterson Gear Head Machine

rimcanyon

Diamond
Joined
Sep 28, 2002
Location
Salinas, CA USA
Newest member of the shop:

peterson1.jpg
It was originally mfd. as an automotive head machine, but it did not come with an air table. Which is fine for my usage.

I was surprised at the amount of iron (guess is 1500 lbs not incl. the rotary table), but the large table will work well for fabrication. The thing I like the most about it is the lack of chatter and vibration. I could put an XY table on it and use it as a milling machine.

I am curious whether or not it would make a good tapping machine. I saw an Aciera gear head drill press that was designed for tapping, the spindle and feed reversed instantly when the set depth was achieved, but this machine does not have a power feed. The working height is pretty huge, so no problem fitting a Procunier or similar.

It has an MT3 spindle.
 
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Nice machine. I had an Arboga GM3512 drill press. It came with a pocket in the base where a foot switch could be installed. The catalog stated that it could be equipped 3 ways, on/off for drilling, on/off/reverse/off for tapping, or momentary fwd/reverse for tapping. Maybe just a switch like that would be all you need.
I have some Tapmatic heads I should sell if you want to go that way.
 
The picture is deceiving. That is Zoran’s shop in San Diego, where I picked it up. He wants to sell the Maho, but its been converted to manual, the Heidenhain stopped working. The head rises about 2’ above the current position.
 
I am curious whether or not it would make a good tapping machine. I saw an Aciera gear head drill press that was designed for tapping, the spindle and feed reversed instantly when the set depth was achieved, but this machine does not have a power feed.

rimcanyon,
It looks like a nice machine.

I don't think you would want power feed for tapping. Not for a tapping head and not for power tapping directly with the machine either.

A tapping head sounds like a simple solution.

I am guessing the Aciera didn't use power feed either for tapping?

I have used a Chinese geared head drill where you bring the tap down with the manual handwheel, it would power tap and then it would do an instant spindle reverse when it reached depth. However, I can't recall what caused it to reverse. I think moving the manual feed handwheel CW would switch it into reverse (i.e. electrical switch would reverse the motor). I don't see why an adjustable switch on the quill couldn't do the same.

But a Tapmatic sounds pretty good/more reliable too.

I hadn't heard of Petersen, so found this video showing a TCM-25 in it's natural habitat. The owners have added power to lift the head, DRO on the quill and a VFD, all sound useful. The only problem is the air table is too heavy at times (i.e. when trying to align small diameter pilots).

 
Newest member of the shop:

View attachment 433013
It was originally mfd. as an automotive head machine, but it did not come with an air table. Which is fine for my usage.

I was surprised at the amount of iron (guess is 1500 lbs not incl. the rotary table), but the large table will work well for fabrication. The thing I like the most about it is the lack of chatter and vibration. I could put an XY table on it and use it as a milling machine.

I am curious whether or not it would make a good tapping machine. I saw an Aciera gear head drill press that was designed for tapping, the spindle and feed reversed instantly when the set depth was achieved, but this machine does not have a power feed. The working height is pretty huge, so no problem fitting a Procunier or similar.

It has an MT3 spindle.
Who made that rotary?
 
Pretty sure that column goes almost to the floor, so when the head is cranked up there is a ton of daylight between the spindle and the table.
The original air float head fixture used a lot of daylight and you still needed room for the cylinder head on top of that and then room for valve guide drills and reamers. Peterson / Berco stuff is well engineered and nice stuff.
 
rimcanyon,
It looks like a nice machine.

I don't think you would want power feed for tapping. Not for a tapping head and not for power tapping directly with the machine either.

A tapping head sounds like a simple solution.

I am guessing the Aciera didn't use power feed either for tapping?

I have used a Chinese geared head drill where you bring the tap down with the manual handwheel, it would power tap and then it would do an instant spindle reverse when it reached depth. However, I can't recall what caused it to reverse. I think moving the manual feed handwheel CW would switch it into reverse (i.e. electrical switch would reverse the motor). I don't see why an adjustable switch on the quill couldn't do the same.
The Aciera had a switch to reverse the spindle at a settable depth, I don't know about the feed, I only saw the machine being demo'ed. That would work well for this machine too, and not too hard to implement.
 
The rotary is a Leitz optical. I don't have any documentation on it, but I think it measures to an arc second. I need to spend some time working on it, the optics are pretty dirty.
Nice coincidence because several months I got an optical Leitz Weztlar rotary table from a Pacific NorthWest auction. Real neat little table, but very rare. Only info I can get on it is a thread by PM member who has the same table, and his is on a small Jig borer, so I assume mine was also at one time.

I think I should make a thread here on PM about it.
 
x
Nice coincidence because several months I got an optical Leitz Weztlar rotary table from a Pacific NorthWest auction. Real neat little table, but very rare. Only info I can get on it is a thread by PM member who has the same table, and his is on a small Jig borer, so I assume mine was also at one time.

I think I should make a thread here on PM about it.
Please do so. I'll contribute, and it will be a good motivation to get the table working.

The rotary table setup on the drill press made more sense to me when I saw the tag on the machine from the original owner: LADWP, Los Angeles Water and Power. I think they used it to machine large flanges or valves.
 








 
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