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Planer Work paper

Rees Acheson

Plastic
Joined
Feb 25, 2024
Location
Alstead, NH, USA
Attached is a pdf file of the "Planer Work" paper that I wrote for my son, Fitz. It is the 3rd revision, dated Feb 23, 2024. (Edit: dated Feb 28, includes expansion correction.)

Richard King has previously been kind enough to post the original to this forum, and then one update. I appreciate it. However, I think that I should not further impose with update number three, so I signed up with my own account. I am not much of an internet user and so I hope that the attachment works.

This version of the paper tries to fix some possible ambiguities and grammar. I think that the only new part is the addition of an appendix that contains a few numerical calculation formulae and how they were arrived at. These include cutting horsepower, axial cutting force and heat released by cutting. It is possible that "The Clapperbox" was not in the last version, either.

If errors are spotted I would appreciate hearing about them. These might include grammar or lack of clarity, but I would especially like to learn of factual errors, or differences in opinion of concept. This paper is almost entirely the result of my own experience and so could easily contain such errors or misconceptions.

In my work, the planer has not been the most used tool, but since 1973 has been my favorite. My hope is that this paper will be useful to others - perhaps even extending the life of the planer as an acceptable tool.

Rees Acheson
 

Attachments

  • PlanerWork_Acheson.pdf
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That’s a very helpful write up! Esp appreciate the appendix calculations. Have not spent time on a planer but always wondered how much force I was exerting doing deeper cuts on a 26” stroke shaper.
 
Rees,
Thank you very much also. I do have a small planer and several shapers. This should be very helpful.
Thanks again,
Ben
 
Thanks very much.

Great write up.

Quick skim has already clarified a couple of things that I sort of knew but didn't properly understand the why or wherefore of. I don't have or use a planer just a shaper and mill but its clear that a careful reading will be oaf great benefit when its comes to clamping, holding and generally makining sure the part comes out as it should rather than not quite.

Clive
 
Thanks! I just printed and spiral bound a copy, as for me anything over a few pages isn't convenient to view on a handheld device (I'm a poor excuse for a millennial). This'll make some good night reading!

I appreciate you and Richard making this information available. Not everyone has experienced mentors on the job to point them in the right direction, so even when you have to purchase a book or take a class, that's better than going blind.

Part of my draw to plainers is that they're a machine that's largely become obsolete in machine shops, but there's still some jobs that they do better than what replaced them and the only way to really utilize them in those capacity is to fully understand their set-up and limitations.
 
Thanks for the write up. I do not own a planer but I would really like to buy one that is in very good operating condition (I do not have time for a project) and it needs to be on the small side for a planer. That means it should fit easily into one bay of a two-car garage. It would be the best machine for machining the straight edge castings I make. Ideally, it would machine a 48" face.

Denis
 
Thanks for the write up. I do not own a planer but I would really like to buy one that is in very good operating condition (I do not have time for a project) and it needs to be on the small side for a planer. That means it should fit easily into one bay of a two-car garage. It would be the best machine for machining the straight edge castings I make. Ideally, it would machine a 48" face.

Denis
We'll be watching when you do find one:).

I seem to remember a 48" ish open side hydraulic on here in the last couple years. Can't remember if it was for sale but some of the discussion was that it was almost too small to be useful, but if you're not making straight edges over 48" then it was perfect for that.
 
Dear Rees,

Thanks for the nice write-up.

If errors are spotted I would appreciate hearing about them. These might include grammar or lack of clarity, but I would especially like to learn of factual errors, or differences in opinion of concept.
A factual error that caught my eye:

On page 37, you write "Iron expands when warmed at a rate of 63x10^-7 inches per degree F of rise." The units are incorrect. It should read "Iron expands when warmed at a rate of 63x10^-7 inches per inch per degree F of rise."

One further comment, in view of the copyright:

Please consider also adding one of the Creative Commons licenses, for example, "This work is openly licensed via CC BY 4.0", immediately after the copyright. There are six different Creative Commons licenses, so if you decide to do this, you'll need to read about the differences between them, and pick one. The BY 4.0 license I have selected as an example above enables reusers (including commercial ones) to distribute, remix, adapt, and build upon your material in any medium or format, so long as attribution is given to the creator. For example, this would allow an individual or company to reproduce one of your drawings in a book, provided that they give you credit for the drawing and cite your document. In my opinion, this is the best way to ensure that the material outlives you and yours but that you also receive appropriate recognition for creating it.

Cheers,
Bruce
 
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Thank you much for this publication! I have printed it and will study it. I have a Cincinnati Hypro 3x3x12 planer that I need to learn how to use eventually.

I would note for the benefit of those who may not know this that Mr. Acheson has posted videos on youtube of some of his planer work. Search his name on youtube and you should find them.
 
On page 37, you write "Iron expands when warmed at a rate of 63x10^-7 inches per degree F of rise." The units are incorrect. It should read "Iron expands when warmed at a rate of 63x10^-7 inches per inch per degree F of rise."
Ah! Thanks for catching that. Just the sort of thing I tend to miss on proof reading. I will now see if I can successfully upload the fix. Edit: I cannot see how to update the attached file. If anyone could offer help on that I would appreciate it.

And thanks for the copyright info. I will look into that. I have always felt that information should be freely shared, yet have had more than one instance of people claiming to have written something of mine.
Rees
 
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Hi Rees,
And thanks for the copyright info. I will look into that.
You're welcome.

FYI this is not about "copyright" but rather about "licensing". I'm not proposing that you change the copyright in any way. That copyright is yours and should remain yours. I am proposing that you license your copyrighted material via an "attribution license" that allows other people to reuse your copyrighted materials provided that they give you credit.

I have always felt that information should be freely shared, yet have had more than one instance of people claiming to have written something of mine.
Adding a Creative Commons license as I have suggested will help to prevent this. It explicitly permits and encourages others to share your work, but with the legal requirement that they must cite your original work, meaning, to give you proper credit.

Cheers,
Bruce
 
Thanks for posting this Rees, this is incredibly valuable and generous. I hope to find a smaller footprint metal planer one day. I can't find anyone near me who runs one.
 








 
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