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Preventing rust on on machines parts inventory ?

The paper is called VCI paper and should be good for up to two years. It doesn't require the parts to be cleaned prior to use so is quite good for parts that are going direct to the end user. It can be fairly expensive though and time consuming if you've got a lot of inventory to wrap.

I make a tool that I stock and like you have started making a fair sized inventory and faced the same problem. I found that the cost of EN24T steel was similar to that of 431 stainless and mechanically the materials are almost identical. It also means that the tool won't rust in storage once with the customer as I've found some store theirs in damp garages etc and have complained about light rusting in the parts.
 
VCI paper likes to be in an enclosed space. You can wrap things in it, but I’ve found that simply laying it on top and then sealing works very well also.

It’s not cheap either. Any good gauge block set has a sheet of it included in the box.

Not seen it mentioned, but I used to ship kits with desiccant packs in heat sealed bags. Cost about $0.10 per. But it’d be a waste unless the pack and part is totally sealed.
 
I use aerosol spray cans of CorrosionX. Fast spray over bins of parts then move them to "shipping" where Stock is put into zip-locked bags with labels.

CorrosionX is an anti-rust oil formulated for spraying (if you buy jugs of the stuff you need their sprayer), and it's used in Aircraft engine compartments, marine, and other applications. Supposedly "bonds" with metal surfaces. What I was told is that the aerosol'd dropplets float around and get into areas of compartments not in direct line-of-sight of spraying.

The aerosol cans work well for me, fast spray, and a quick check I've got coverage as I'm handling them to move into a bin.
 
I have been doing larger batches of inventory as demand grows on my products and as with all grows concerns pop up.

Typically I have been tossing some plastic fishnet sleeves on the shafts and storing them in the e basement (cold and dry)
But some shafts that say over winter I noticed the odd prick of oxidization starting on a shaft seal surface (2” dia 10” long max kinda stuff. 4140ht)
Not ideal. Quick polish and ship it.
It seemed like the pricks where in the patter of the plastic net (nylon? Hydroscopic maybe?)

Either way I’m doing x4 more of inventory than I used to as I got backordered a few times last year. Not cool. In saying that I’m looking for tips on storage and or rust prevention.
Again a cool/dry place. But I don’t want any rework or waste.

My head says dip in wd40 and toss the plastic net on. By my luck they will react and I’ll be out a pile of money!

Thanks for any tips and advice !!!!
In canada you have to watch out for humidity in the spring thaw, as moisture comes through the concrete, only solution is a dehumidifier if its getting spots. you can find VCF Paper or similar, which works they say for 6 months, or an oil spray coating that is messy in a sealed plastic bag.
 
I use VCI paper all the time. I bought a large roll of it from Uline for like $150. I used to use LPS 3 but it sucks to clean off and any spot not coated will still get rust speckles.

VCI products are the way to go in my opinion. It will store longer than 2 years without issue as long as the parts do not sweat. My shop has serious condensation issues and my inventory still does not rust.

Buy the big roll and get a paper cutter. Cut the paper into adequate size squares for whatever parts you are storing. I wouldn't buy the pre-cut stuff, it's a waste of money.

 
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+1 for VCI paper.

You cannot dip shit in a vat of oil and put it on your shelf for years expecting great results. Even if it doesn't rust it will be covered in a crust of nasty oily dust.

I stored a new race small block Ford V8 in a plastic bag with a VCI emitter in a plastic bag when I left for the military in 2001. Two weeks ago I started cleaning out my dad's shop as he's in the end stages of Alzheimer's. I opened up that bagged engine from 22 years of storage in a shop that wasn't heated or dehumidified for the past 15. Engine looked like the day I sealed it in there.

Just a suggestion, but if you are making products for inventory you should have a foolproof packaging that keeps the part clean and pretty while on the shelf and also safe and ready to ship. Slap a label on it and set it out for UPS/FEDEX/USPS/whatever.

When I develop a product the development process is not done until the first production run is sealed in boxes on pallet racking ready for a shipping label.
 
Ten inch long parts? Do it the welders way. get an old refrigerator or freezer that does not run. make sure the compressor and any fans are not electrically connected. Bypass the light switch so it stays on when the door is shut.
Bill D

 
Mold shield is another option...leaves a dry film. There are other brands that seem to work as well.

 
The plastic mesh stuff that is like a chinese finger trap is corrosive or acidic in my opinion. I have had parts that still had a coat of oil after coming out of the machine, have a rusty "pattern" that matches those protective sleeves.

Proper packaging is key. When I worked Tier 1 automotive, everything was stored in plastic dunnage, inside a VCI bag, with VCI paper, with several desiccant bags the size of a 1 gallon ziplock. If not closed up completely, the parts would still rust.
 
Ten inch long parts? Do it the welders way. get an old refrigerator or freezer that does not run. make sure the compressor and any fans are not electrically connected. Bypass the light switch so it stays on when the door is shut.
Bill D

Bill, that was a bit cryptic don't you think?
Unless I misunderstood your post, you are suggesting that an enclosed and relatively sealed chamber needs nothing but a minor dry heat source to remove humidity and keep stuff contained in it from rusting?
If so, then that is pretty much what my wood furnace manufacturer recommends how to keep the guts from rusting in the off season.

Once burning season is done, put a 10W lightbulb with thin wires into the burn chamber, close the door and leave it until next season.
The small amount of dry heat is enough to keep condensation in check inside the furnace, while the water jacket will remain rust free as long as there is no air in the line.
 
The plastic mesh stuff that is like a chinese finger trap is corrosive or acidic in my opinion. I have had parts that still had a coat of oil after coming out of the machine, have a rusty "pattern" that matches those protective sleeves.

Proper packaging is key. When I worked Tier 1 automotive, everything was stored in plastic dunnage, inside a VCI bag, with VCI paper, with several desiccant bags the size of a 1 gallon ziplock. If not closed up completely, the parts would still rust.
found this mesh sleeve with rust inhibitor, looks interesting, would be nice to find a bulk supplyer and not pay mcmaster prices for it. seems steep compared to uline (for the non rust inhibating as a comparason) bu in the grand scheeme its not a horrible price. likely half somewhere else tho?
 
Been meaning to try anhydrous lanolin, need to find a source.
You can buy it by the pound on Amazon at a small fraction of the price FlexBar charges for a 2 ounce tube. It's used by lots of amateur cosmetic and New Age body rub people. If you do buy in bulk, I'd recommend paying the modest premium for pharmaceutical grade to reduce the risk of contamination with something rust-provoking (like sheep sweat).
I only use on gage blocks and similar things. To use it on a mass of parts, I'd want to find a solvent or something so I could spray, dip or brush it. I don't have the patience to hand rub it onto parts, and certainly not to get it into holes, grooves, recesses, etc.
 
My recommendation is a bit more modest, but works for me.. cardboard tube, same as my chrome rod and TGP steel is shipped and stored in. It keeps them dry, very low risk of rust and safe from dings. Rust is a big problem for me as my shop sits just a few feet above the water table, but the cardboard tubes have made it a much smaller issue. Also they'd be pre packaged for shipping or delivery. Nearly all shafts chrome or otherwise, that leave my shop are in the cardboard tubes to prevent damage from mishandling by rough handling " I'm not installing it anyway" hired hands.

Just my $0.0002
 
My recommendation is a bit more modest, but works for me.. cardboard tube, same as my chrome rod and TGP steel is shipped and stored in. It keeps them dry, very low risk of rust and safe from dings. Rust is a big problem for me as my shop sits just a few feet above the water table, but the cardboard tubes have made it a much smaller issue. Also they'd be pre packaged for shipping or delivery. Nearly all shafts chrome or otherwise, that leave my shop are in the cardboard tubes to prevent damage from mishandling by rough handling " I'm not installing it anyway" hired hands.

Just my $0.0002
Be careful of cardboard in really high humidity areas. When I worked in Auckland NZ we had a huge problem with cardboard absorbing water. Paper in general absorbs water in the air very well. Most people will have experienced the issues with paper in a printer if it's humid.

I do use cardboard tubes for shipping but I dry them in the oven first.
 
Be careful of cardboard in really high humidity areas. When I worked in Auckland NZ we had a huge problem with cardboard absorbing water. Paper in general absorbs water in the air very well. Most people will have experienced the issues with paper in a printer if it's humid.

I do use cardboard tubes for shipping but I dry them in the oven first.
Good point, my area is no where near coastal humidity levels. The cardboard more or less creates a humidity stable environment and prevents temp change condensation. That's all my shop requires here in the middle of the north American continent. Humidity levels usually are less than 80% and frequently less than 60%. Some of my TGP ( 4140, yes a bit resistant to start with) has been in tubes 2-3 years without any rust at all.
 








 
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