What's new
What's new

Preventing rust on on machines parts inventory ?

Good point, my area is no where near coastal humidity levels. The cardboard more or less creates a humidity stable environment and prevents temp change condensation. That's all my shop requires here in the middle of the north American continent. Humidity levels usually are less than 80% and frequently less than 60%. Some of my TGP ( 4140, yes a bit resistant to start with) has been in tubes 2-3 years without any rust at all.
I wonder if anyone makes tubes treated with rust preventative.
 
I wonder if anyone makes tubes treated with rust preventative.
Unsure, but you can buy tubes of rust preventative plastic film on 1500 foot roles. Probably cheaper and longer lasting. Not as long lasting, but throwing a sheet or two of VCI paper in before closing up a cardboard tube would probably work for a while.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ox
Unsure, but you can buy tubes of rust preventative plastic film on 1500 foot roles. Probably cheaper and longer lasting. Not as long lasting, but throwing a sheet or two of VCI paper in before closing up a cardboard tube would probably work for a while.
Do you have a name for the plastic film.
 
Been using the ATF for 40 years and it works. But you spend your money all out.
I am with dkmc here! my metal is stored in an open garage bay that what ever dew point humidity is happening outside is trapped inside. while the door is raised daily mostly it stays a bit moist-ish feeling and about 85 degrees. have had a lot of steel sitting on the racks, some for decades. all i have ever used is a hand spray bottle with wd40 and linseed oil (a drying oil) for 60 years and have no rust on it or in between it. so go spend YOUR money how you want, taxpayers coffers will not cover you here. alternatively just cover everything with a healthy coat of cheap wheel bearing grease and wrap it in a plastic bag.
 
UPDATE:

Firstly thank you everyone for your inputs. Hopefully this can be a small guide of ideas for our fellow machine shops.

As for my result I have gone with cardboard tubes with plastic end caps.
Parts are not cleaned of lathe coolant to keep a little oil layer (Dino juice coolant)
And a small sheet of VCI paper is added inside the tube for good measure.

My parts storage is separate from the shop and maintained a veletively low humidity all year. 20-50% room is cool but in the winter is headed by the central furnace system


If I find problems with this method I will again update this thread. If no additional updates are posted over 3 years it’s either done the job or inventory is turning over at a proper pace.
My initial concern was if boosting inventory levels was a big oops and I’m saddled with it over several years. Ideally all inventory turns over in 6-12 months, but I did not want my pot of gold rusting if there’s a downturn :p

Have a great day all!!!!
 
I have been doing larger batches of inventory as demand grows on my products and as with all grows concerns pop up.

Typically I have been tossing some plastic fishnet sleeves on the shafts and storing them in the e basement (cold and dry)
But some shafts that say over winter I noticed the odd prick of oxidization starting on a shaft seal surface (2” dia 10” long max kinda stuff. 4140ht)
Not ideal. Quick polish and ship it.
It seemed like the pricks where in the patter of the plastic net (nylon? Hydroscopic maybe?)

Either way I’m doing x4 more of inventory than I used to as I got backordered a few times last year. Not cool. In saying that I’m looking for tips on storage and or rust prevention.
Again a cool/dry place. But I don’t want any rework or waste.

My head says dip in wd40 and toss the plastic net on. By my luck they will react and I’ll be out a pile of money!

Thanks for any tips and advice !!!!
We use PB Blaster surface shield and it’s the best stuff we’ve found so far. Only problem is it’s hard to find… most of our suppliers are out of stock. Whenever I see it at Home Depot I buy a whole case. Try it out.
 








 
Back
Top