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Program chamfer using part off tool

Neil101

Aluminum
Joined
May 20, 2022
Hey fellas ,

How would I program the cutoff tool to make a chamfer in this program?

T707
G00 Z.1
X2.5
Z-2.246
G01 X2.2 F.005
X0.25 F.008
X0.01 F.003
G00 X4.0
 
Last edited:
It's sort of impossible to answer your question without knowing both the width and edge radius of your parting tool, and where on the tool you're calling Z0. (Lead Edge/Rear Edge)

I do this all the time, but am no expert at it. I usually do a short plunge first to give clearance for the tool when it slides in from the chamfer. Because of the type of parts I'm making, I also chamfer both the cutoff part and the chucked part at the same time before continuing with the cutoff.

Regardless... these are sort of simple moves in an area with a lot of wide open space. Don't you think it would be best to draw it up in CAD and figure it out for yourself? Then you'll be ready and versed for next time.
 
It's sort of impossible to answer your question without knowing both the width and edge radius of your parting tool, and where on the tool you're calling Z0. (Lead Edge/Rear Edge)

I do this all the time, but am no expert at it. I usually do a short plunge first to give clearance for the tool when it slides in from the chamfer. Because of the type of parts I'm making, I also chamfer both the cutoff part and the chucked part at the same time before continuing with the cutoff.

Regardless... these are sort of simple moves in an area with a lot of wide open space. Don't you think it would be best to draw it up in CAD and figure it out for yourself? Then you'll be ready and versed for next time.
I’m calling the lead edge zero, insert width is .157, and edge radius is .015.

I could easily do it in the CAD program. Just trying to hand program it.
 
That's what I mean... hand code it with a drawing for coordinate reference. After doing it once or twice you won't need the drawing.
Can you give me an example of program that does the chamfer on both the cutoff part and the chucked part at the same time?
 
I don't technically do them simultaneously, but within the cutoff tool program section of the main program.

If you're talking more of an edge break or smaller chamfer, create a short cutoff groove, nail one chamfer on the way out of the groove, jump over in Z and then hit the other chamfer on the way back in and finish with the cutoff. It all happens in seconds.

No I won't do it for you. Other then adjustments and tweaks, I don't ever program at the machine and would have to draw it out. No time for that. Besides, you wouldn't learn a thing. I've only had my lathe for a few years, and even though I've made many-many parts on it, am still kind of a newb with it. Programming wise anyway. I have a lot of mill experience, but that barely matters on a lathe.
 
I don't technically do them simultaneously, but within the cutoff tool program section of the main program.

If you're talking more of an edge break or smaller chamfer, create a short cutoff groove, nail one chamfer on the way out of the groove, jump over in Z and then hit the other chamfer on the way back in and finish with the cutoff. It all happens in seconds.

No I won't do it for you. Other then adjustments and tweaks, I don't ever program at the machine and would have to draw it out. No time for that. Besides, you wouldn't learn a thing. I've only had my lathe for a few years, and even though I've made many-many parts on it, am still kind of a newb with it. Programming wise anyway. I have a lot of mill experience, but that barely matters on a lathe.
Thanks
 
TOA.. Tan angle=o/a. Solve for a. You know your X starting point, then determine what you want your X finish point to be (how much below bar diameter you want the chamfer to be), and pick your own angle you want the chamfer to be. What you are solving for is your starting Z dimension.
 
I just program my X to however far below the OD that I want my chamfer to be (.06 D +/- ? ) and then:

U.1 F10.
W.05
U-.1 W-.05 F3.

.... and then continue with the cut-off.

This is a highly generic / routine code that I use in most programs.

You can edit the depth of the chamfer as you go, and you don't need to edit the actual chamfer motion - unless you git bigger than .04 chamfer, then you may want to bump up your U's and W's.


-------------------------------

Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
TOA.. Tan angle=o/a. Solve for a. You know your X starting point, then determine what you want your X finish point to be (how much below bar diameter you want the chamfer to be), and pick your own angle you want the chamfer to be. What you are solving for is your starting Z dimension.
Appreciate it.
 
No I won't do it for you. Other then adjustments and tweaks, I don't ever program at the machine and would have to draw it out. No time for that. Besides, you wouldn't learn a thing.
Exactly. Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach him how to fish and you will find him out on the lake in a boat drinking beer. :D

Regards,

Bill
 








 
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