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Project Schaublin 160 - Rebuild of S/N 193947

cwilcox

Cast Iron
Joined
Aug 26, 2010
Location
Canada
Last wednesday I drove 1200 km to bring home a 160. This thread is intended to document my progress as I get it going. There are lots of hurdles in the way but the first is behind me, it has landed in my garage. Don't mind the 1 ton rating of the beam, the span is reduced and a structural engineer checked it for this lathe at the reduced span.
A few pictures of the journey.
 

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I restored that 40 over many years.
News: Schaublin sent me a copy of the wiring diagram but also stated that they don't provide support or parts for these lathes any longer.
I've also received a copy of the Automatic Threading manual which includes the Dog Rail 160-12.120 which is on my lathe. I have a feeling this lathe was heavily outfitted with threading and taper attachment at one time.
 
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Yes and I also received a set of drawings for the machine. I'm very sure I've used up my favours with them now.
 
Found my first thing that I'd like some help with. The casting is cracked on one bolt but not the pin that actually transmits the torque. Makes me think that someone tried taking it apart the wrong way and pulled on it. I'm thinking the drive pin would be the thing that takes the force and it is nice and snug in its hole and the slot in the nut.
My options are to leave it as is (the bolts do take good torque) or to grind it out and oxy-acetylene braze it, risking warping the part. At this time I'm going to leave it alone but open to opinions.
 

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Mmm interesting one, applying heat is always a concern as it will require a lot for a fair duration to fill this area so I would avoid that if possible. I'm no metallurgist but maybe drill into the end through the crack and into the body of the slide with a fairly small OD drill maybe M2 or M3 depending on space, countersink the hole for the cap head, open the hole (no tapping) in the portion that is cracked and tap the meaty part the other side of the crack and screw in a bolt to pull the parts together, if you wicked some Hysol 9462 into the crack before tightening up that might go someway to holding things in place - one bolt should do on the opposite side to where a pin appears to be positioned (in photo).

Just my 2c worth.
 
Can you take a picture of the bottom side of the base / crack area?
I'm careful regarding recommending based on pictures only, but I'd say that unless you are experienced with cast iron brazing, have the knowledge and tools for proper pre/post heat and you are willing to take the chance of dealing with deformed slide, skip it or give it to someone who has the expertise. Depending on the geometry of the chip, I would consider inserting two small (~M3) bolts from the front (maybe drilled slightly diagonally) and depends on the space on the bottom- bigger counter-bore and use a specially made bold with extra wide flange (that will put most of the load on the non-cracked side) or using a wide washer (maybe eccentric washer that puts more pressure on the non-cracked side). Something like in the attached picture.
Another thing I would consider is to relieve the nut in the cracked area, but milling its bottom a bit in let's say the last third. I would avoid countersink bolt which apply forces to separate the chip from the rest of the base.
 

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Hi, the lead screw nut is shown upside down in that image. a SHCS comes up through the cracked hole from below and threads into the nut. The slot (with little oil gallery hole in it) is for a dowel pin for main load transfer. It is like someone unscrewed the second bolt and tried to lift the top off. Its all very strange. Maybe I'll try the two m3 SHCS, I have everything at home needed for that repair.
 
I meant a picture of the bottom (other) side of the base, not of the nut.
If you go for mechanical repair, I would retrofit the original SHCS with a wider and eccentric washer, as well as corresponding counter bore in the base. This is in addition to two small SHCS from the front end to retain the chip in place. Consider injecting some retaining liquid/Loctite into the crack when you fasten the chip in place.
 
Best glue is Hysol 9462 they use this to glue aircraft wings so if you can squeeze any in the crack it will help for sure.
 
Here are a few more images including some M3x12 fasteners. There is nothing wrong with the counterbore or the bottom side, it is just the shank of the bolt loaded this part and chipped it out for some reason. I don't follow the eccentric washer idea but maybe it is not longer needed given these better images?
Oh, that little plug is for an oil gallery.
I'd also have to make sure these bolts didn't get in the way of any travel or anything else.
 

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Here are a few more images including some M3x12 fasteners. There is nothing wrong with the counterbore or the bottom side, it is just the shank of the bolt loaded this part and chipped it out for some reason. I don't follow the eccentric washer idea but maybe it is not longer needed given these better images?
Oh, that little plug is for an oil gallery.
I'd also have to make sure these bolts didn't get in the way of any travel or anything else.
your Schaublin has been badly abused--view post 7photos and witness spot welds on compound feed crank handle--years of forcing cutting tool into workpiece with added leverage of breaker bar--casting failed because greatest transmitted force was absorbed by outboard socket head fastener--
suggest repair milling pocket up to web of dowel pin anchoring lead nut-- using block of Dura-bar insert secured by flank tapped penetrations up to tangent of pin anchor--- fastener threaded pockets should be deep--not shallow--this I learned from surgical colleagues inserting pedicle screws into spongy spinal column vertebrae--
shallow fasteners fail/pull out rapidly

Loctite where appropriate
 
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Yes its had a hard life but I saw that the day I bought it. I've seen This Old Tony run the drill on the compound as well. One thing to note here, I'm just a hobbyist so if I can make this thing run better than a mini lathe from harbour freight then it'll be considered successful. I've got an autotransformer coming for it so electrically I should be fully procured.
I'll run in a couple M3's and move on to the tailstock cleanup.
Thanks for all the advice.
 
I would agree with the smaller bolt suggestion, I did mention in my post M2 or M3, looking at the scale M2 might be better and you could countersink the head if you had enough 'meat' which would avoid any fouling if that was a possibility, machining the head of a bolt to be smaller in diameter and slightly shallower might also be a consideration as it results in less metal needing to be removed to countersink.

Yes well used but it will be perfect for your 'hobby' machining I am sure, I am the same and often wonder just how much is discussed about minute fractions of millimetres, yes if your building a rocket maybe but for most of the stuff that ticks our boxes a little wear is really not an issue IMO - enjoy the engineering and ownership of an iconic machine :-)
 
How are people obtaining change gears for these lathes? I was able to buy a 72T off ebay but there aren't many out there for sale.
 
Keep an eye out simply is the best way, the dutch ebay site is good, Swiss one too, machine auctions and a regular check on Google with the time filter to say last few weeks will show any items that may be on sale.
 








 
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