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Question about the big Schaublin-102VM lathe

Joined
May 29, 2023
Hello, I recently purchased a Schaublin metal lathe, specifically the 1962 model 102-VM, from the Facebook marketplace. Along with the lathe, I acquired several accessories, including three chucks: a 3-jaw self-centering chuck, a 4-jaw self-centering chuck, and a 4-jaw independent chuck. Additionally, there was a Jacob chuck 33, a keyless chuck (which I believe was not common at the time of purchase, so it was unlikely included in the lathe, however it is still an authentic Schaublin accessory), a variety of collets in different sizes (approximately twenty of them), a traveling steady rest, and more. Essentially, I received everything of importance for the Schaublin 102-VM lathe except for the milling-related accessories and the mag-chuck, which I would have loved to have. Notably, the lathe itself and the majority, if not all, of these accessories are of Swiss or German origin. I couldn't find any items imported from Asia or other places with a poor reputation. It is important to note that terms like "Made in Germany" and "Made in Switzerland" are not necessarily synonymous with quality. This reputation has somewhat eroded in recent times due to companies simply assembling products in these renowned countries for marketing purposes. However, this concept is negligible when it comes to tools from that era.

However, there are a few imperfections. Although I don't doubt the quality it possessed when it left the factory, that quality has diminished over time. The lathe is particularly old, having served for 61 years, it appears to have been moderately used. There is a slight lack of lubrication, as it wasn't lubricated daily, and when it was, it mostly focused on the necessary areas to move the carriage, making it challenging to move the carriage to the extreme right of the bed. The paint is in poor condition, the back panel is rusty, and the lathe is generally dirty, covered in a mixture of grease and dust. In summary, it shows signs of slight neglect.

Nonetheless, the lathe's condition remains good. The carriage is still easily movable for 80% of the bed length, the tailstock is among the best I have seen, and the compound rest is equally impressive. These components exemplify high precision and have aged gracefully. After cleaning, the lathe already looks better, and there are no indications of broken or missing parts, etc.

I must admit that I am quite new to the world of machining. I have only developed a serious interest in it within the past year. Until now, my involvement has mostly been theoretical, except for a few small and potentially hazardous projects on the drill press. Occasionally, I converted them into milling tasks, or lacking a milling table, I would manipulate the workpiece with my hands. In the worst-case scenario, I would use the lathe in the most basic way, employing files to shape the piece secured in a Jacob chuck. I have no practical experience whatsoever. Consequently, I have several questions and hope to receive some guidance. Here they are:

Is this a good lathe for the price? Based on my research on the marketplace and other sales platforms, I believe it is, but I often hear YouTubers discuss lathes they acquired at significantly lower prices.

Is it a reliable lathe? Again, I have gathered that it is, but I am uncertain about the specific aspects that make it reliable. While it is a lathe designed for relatively precise operations, I wonder if it is also suitable for more general machining tasks.

I am considering scraping the bed by hand, excluding the removal of the headstock. Is this a practical idea, or would it simply be a waste of time?

The machine requires approximately 600V. Considering that I have access to a maximum welding socket, would a VFD (Variable Frequency Drive) be a viable solution?

A small quick-change tool post was included with the machine, and I'm curious about its quality. Naturally, it cannot provide the same rigidity as a larger post. Given that larger posts were available during the production of the lathe, I wonder about the usefulness and application of its miniature version. I left a picture of this ridiculous post and the lathe in question.

If you have any additional information, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you, and have a great day.

The tool post:
Capture d’écran, le 2023-05-29 à 01.42.19.png
The lathe:
s-l1600.jpg
 
The toolpost in the picture is a Tripan, available from swiss kh . Be prepared to part with your firstborn to buy them. They are reported to be extremely accurate (around 2 µM in optimal conditions). The 100-series Tripan are considered the optimal size for this small lathe, which was not meant to do real hogging. It can and will, but it wasn't designed for it.

Your questions might be better answered in the Schaublin forum, or even the machine reconditioning forum...

I would recommend that you get to know the machine, which was extremely accurate when it left the factory, learn your way around the basics (with the South Bend book How to run a lathe in hand), and its quirks, before you dive into reconditioning it; you'll have to know what problems you run into before you start learning to fix them. And if you're set on reconditioning more than on using a lathe, get a klunker to fix up, not a complex high-class machine. You'll need a working machine while fixing a lathe anyway. YMMV, of course

Good luck!

Hans
 
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Is it a very good lathe for the price? It depends on a variety of factors, the single biggest of which is, of course, the price.
 
Without a picture of your lathe (not one like it), it is hard to make an opinion on fair price, and the amount of tooling that comes with a lathe can drastically affect pricing. There is a time and place for hand scraping a lathe to perfection, your first lathe, before you've even learned to operate it, is neither. You have enough work ahead of you just in cleaning, possibly with some disassembly and repair, then learning to run it, before you will be anywhere near ready for scraping. There are 14 machines in my shop, nothing newer than 1990, they all work just fine, the only one with a nice scraped finish was purchased that way for $1200. I think most people spend more on their first lathe than they should have, its a right of passage thing, welcome aboard :D
 

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Without a picture of your lathe (not one like it), it is hard to make an opinion on fair price, and the amount of tooling that comes with a lathe can drastically affect pricing. There is a time and place for hand scraping a lathe to perfection, your first lathe, before you've even learned to operate it, is neither. You have enough work ahead of you just in cleaning, possibly with some disassembly and repair, then learning to run it, before you will be anywhere near ready for scraping. There are 14 machines in my shop, nothing newer than 1990, they all work just fine, the only one with a nice scraped finish was purchased that way for $1200. I think most people spend more on their first lathe than they should have, its a right of passage thing, welcome aboard :D
i posted the pictures tell me what you think
 
I have a bunch of Schaublin collets...cheap


E-32
 

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The toolpost in the picture is a Tripan, available from swiss kh . Be prepared to part with your firstborn to buy them. They are reported to be extremely accurate (around 2 µM in optimal conditions). The 100-series Tripan are considered the optimal size for this small lathe, which was not meant to do real hogging. It can and will, but it wasn't designed for it.

Your questions might be better answered in the Schaublin forum, or even the machine reconditioning forum...

I would recommend that you get to know the machine, which was extremely accurate when it left the factory, learn your way around the basics (with the South Bend book How to run a lathe in hand), and its quirks, before you dive into reconditioning it; you'll have to know what problems you run into before you start learning to fix them. And if you're set on reconditioning more than on using a lathe, get a klunker to fix up, not a complex high-class machine. You'll need a working machine while fixing a lathe anyway. YMMV, of course

Good luck!

Hans
 

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Whereabouts in QC are you? I'm gonna call the Surete du Quebec because you STOLE that machine!



Was it in the Kingston area? I seem to recall one around there.

What ever you do don't try to scrape it, chances are you'll ruin it.

It looks very well cared for, clean it up a bit, figure out how to power it up and enjoy!
 
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i posted the pictures tell me what you think
Judging by the pics, and the adverts TK linked, it looks like you got a pretty fair deal. Why would you want to fool with scraping, it looks like it just needs a little TLC and it will be ready to go. Read "How to run a lathe", it's South Bend specific, but 90% is applicable to all lathe work.
 
Whereabouts in QC are you? I'm gonna call the Surete du Quebec because you STOLE that machine!



Was it in the Kingston area? I seem to recall one around there.

What ever you do don't try to scrape it, chances are you'll ruin it.

It looks very well cared for, clean it up a bit, figure out how to power it up and enjoy!

Judging by the pics, and the adverts TK linked, it looks like you got a pretty fair deal. Why would you want to fool with scraping, it looks like it just needs a little TLC and it will be ready to go. Read "How to run a lathe", it's South Bend specific, but 90% is applicable to all lathe work.

You're absolutely right! After thoroughly cleaning and lubricating the bed, the saddle now moves smoothly without any issues, making it unnecessary and risky to scrape the ways. However, I have decided to proceed with the removal of the motor, belt, pump, carriage, and other components. This will allow me to fine-tune the adjustable parts and replace any simple components as a proactive maintenance measure. While everything is disassembled, I plan to take advantage of the opportunity to apply body filler to areas that require it. My ultimate objective is to restore the machine to its original color through repainting. I should note that I will not be removing the headstock, as I understand it is considered almost a crime against humanity due to its importance and significance in the functioning of the machine.
 
Judging by the pics, and the adverts TK linked, it looks like you got a pretty fair deal. Why would you want to fool with scraping, it looks like it just needs a little TLC and it will be ready to go. Read "How to run a lathe", it's South Bend specific, but 90% is applicable to all lathe work.

You're absolutely right! After thoroughly cleaning and lubricating the bed, the saddle now moves smoothly without any issues, making it unnecessary and risky to scrape the ways. However, I have decided to proceed with the removal of the motor, belt, pump, carriage, and other components. This will allow me to fine-tune the adjustable parts and replace any simple components as a proactive maintenance measure. While everything is disassembled, I plan to take advantage of the opportunity to apply body filler to areas that require it. My ultimate objective is to restore the machine to its original color through repainting. I should note that I will not be removing the headstock, as I understand it is considered almost a crime against humanity due to its importance and significance in the functioning of the machine.
 
Whereabouts in QC are you? I'm gonna call the Surete du Quebec because you STOLE that machine!



Was it in the Kingston area? I seem to recall one around there.

What ever you do don't try to scrape it, chances are you'll ruin it.

It looks very well cared for, clean it up a bit, figure out how to power it up and enjoy!
I'm currently in the suburbs of Montreal, and I recently purchased a lathe from a seller in Quebec City, which is about a 2-hour and 30-minute drive away. Given that I'm only 20 years old, I don't have much experience with trailers, especially when it comes to transporting such a large machine. Surprisingly, the journey went quite smoothly. My trailer didn't struggle too much, and I successfully managed to back it up into my garage on the first attempt.
However, the main issue I'm facing now is unloading the lathe from the trailer. As you can see, it's still sitting on the trailer. Tomorrow, I plan to acquire a small 8-foot crane of some sort to assist with the unloading process, much to the delight of my father.
 
Moving heavy stuff is a skill that must be learned along with using heavy stuff like machine tools. When I got my first milling machine in 1974, I simply called a local moving company to pick it up at the trucking terminal, bring it to my home and put it in the basement. Next step was to buy a pickup truck and design and build an adjustable height gantry crane and add a 1 ton chain hoist and trolley. My gantry could be shortened enough to get out through the garage door and then raised enough to unload a machine from the truck. Later, to move all the stuff to a new home, I bought a used 2 ton shop crane/engine hoist for unloading the truck at the new place. The base of the shop crane was too narrow at the jack end to allow it to straddle a Hardinge lathe and lower it to the ground, so I had to weld up a new base with enough space between the legs to safely move the lathe.

You can buy a gantry crane like this and add a chain hoist. It makes getting things on and off a trailer pretty easy. Maybe you could rent one:

Here is a shop crane with splayed legs that will lift the Schaublin, but probably will not not allow you to place the Schaublin on the floor after lifting it off the trailer. Big blocks of wood can help get around that sort of issue.

I hope you are in the mechanical engineering course at your school. I think moving heavy stuff was the first task that gave employment to people with engineering talent, like at Stonehenge.

Larry
 
Moving heavy stuff is a skill that must be learned along with using heavy stuff like machine tools. When I got my first milling machine in 1974, I simply called a local moving company to pick it up at the trucking terminal, bring it to my home and put it in the basement. Next step was to buy a pickup truck and design and build an adjustable height gantry crane and add a 1 ton chain hoist and trolley. My gantry could be shortened enough to get out through the garage door and then raised enough to unload a machine from the truck. Later, to move all the stuff to a new home, I bought a used 2 ton shop crane/engine hoist for unloading the truck at the new place. The base of the shop crane was too narrow at the jack end to allow it to straddle a Hardinge lathe and lower it to the ground, so I had to weld up a new base with enough space between the legs to safely move the lathe.

You can buy a gantry crane like this and add a chain hoist. It makes getting things on and off a trailer pretty easy. Maybe you could rent one:

Here is a shop crane with splayed legs that will lift the Schaublin, but probably will not not allow you to place the Schaublin on the floor after lifting it off the trailer. Big blocks of wood can help get around that sort of issue.

I hope you are in the mechanical engineering course at your school. I think moving heavy stuff was the first task that gave employment to people with engineering talent, like at Stonehenge.

Larry
I finally managed to move the lathe using a small mobile crane. The weight of the lathe is approximately 1,500 pounds, which is the maximum capacity of the crane. The lathe itself weighs about 1,250 pounds, but the swing-out drawers hold a large amount of material, causing the drawers to bend over their anchors. I wouldn't be surprised if each drawer weighed over 200 lbs. Although it is not a safe method, I had to do it. For now, the lathe will sit in a corner of the garage until I find a way to transport it on rollers and find a solution to have a 575v 3-phase power supply. Thanks for your help.
 








 
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