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Questions about getting my prototype manufactured- what's needed for an RFP?

helmbelly

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Location
New Orleans
I made a 2x3x1 inch aluminum 2 jawed clamp for bicycle market that I need to get manufacturing quotes for. I have a finished alum prototype ready for scanning. I've made 3D scans before but don't know what output format is standard/expected. In the past I used solidworks I believe. I'm open to diff materials, and processes - I expect to use a CNC shop but 3D printing could maybe work as well with Carbon fiber/Nylon media. Anyway, any info about getting a scan, scan advice would be awesome right now-
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
I made a 2x3x1 inch aluminum 2 jawed clamp for bicycle market that I need to get manufacturing quotes for. I have a finished alum prototype ready for scanning. I've made 3D scans before but don't know what output format is standard/expected. In the past I used solidworks I believe. I'm open to diff materials, and processes - I expect to use a CNC shop but 3D printing could maybe work as well with Carbon fiber/Nylon media. Anyway, any info about getting a scan, scan advice would be awesome right now-
Isn't this the same question ?:
 
Joined
May 26, 2004
Location
Paradise, Ca
Can you show a representitive picture of your parts? Are you sure it needs to be "scanned", as in laser scanner? Could someone use calipers / micrometers / maybe a video measuring machine or CMM for a fraction of the cost?

Laser scanning should only be done if absolutely mandatory. In my experience, the resultant models are anything but 'clean'.
 

TwinSpool

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2021
Can you show a representitive picture of your parts? Are you sure it needs to be "scanned", as in laser scanner? Could someone use calipers / micrometers / maybe a video measuring machine or CMM for a fraction of the cost?

Laser scanning should only be done if absolutely mandatory. In my experience, the resultant models are anything but 'clean'.

The resultant models are as clean as the person is willing to put the time and effort into. If you want something better than a nurbs wrapped surface you'd need to set the expectations up front.

But in general the quality of the model has nothing to do with the way the data was collected and everything to do with the person who interpreted the data and created the model.
 

Overland

Hot Rolled
Joined
Nov 19, 2017
Location
Greenville, SC
Somewhere along the line you're going to need a drawing.
This drawing defines the item, and includes all specifications and tolerances, and sets up the expectations for both partners in a commercial transaction.
Get or make a proper drawing of what you need.
Bob
 

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
A solidworks model is a pretty good start. If you have that in hand, go talk to potential manufacturers. They're the best ones to tell you what format you'll need to supply. A drawing developed from that model detailing the issues mentioned in the post above is a great idea.
 

eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
I concur that a solid model file should be fine. You obviously have a blueprint or sketch of some sort if you made the prototype; make a model from that and you're done.
 

BugRobotics

Stainless
Joined
Jun 22, 2015
Location
Denver, CO
Agree with the others that you need to get a solid model and if the current prototype is hand massaged then getting someone to convert your current prototype into a solid model is gonna make life a lot easier.

If you indeed need it scanned for some reason (artistic features?) or just need the prototype converted to a solid model I can help. Just send over a private message.
 

helmbelly

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Location
New Orleans
Thanks for replies. In the past I made a wooden handgrip for moviecams that had aluminum attachments for adjusting and an electronic brain pocketed in the wood. It was complex for "wood" but I got a 3D scan of it which was converted to solidworks or a viewing format I'm forgettting. I used that to get quotes from CNC shops - the shop I went with made a workpathing formula for a small fee. So that was sorta my plan this time.

I have a drawing for our patent app, it's hand drawn but the part is simple and it's not hard to draw out. Yes I could just make a new drawing incorporating the present changes - but when getting hard quotes from CNC shops I seem to rememeber the first words out of everyones mouth was - do you have a scan but I think for a CNC shop a solidworks would be just as good. I dont know.

The hand grip I made was carved, it was all radii and more like sculpture than machined part. So maybe that's why we had to scan it. But CNC aside we are considering 3D printing and I believe a scan is prob the straightest route for making a workpath. A 3D solidwork file - is prob basically the same thing. I really don't know. I thought you could generate a .swk from a 3D scan but I don't know.
 

helmbelly

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Location
New Orleans
Can you show a representitive picture of your parts? Are you sure it needs to be "scanned", as in laser scanner? Could someone use calipers / micrometers / maybe a video measuring machine or CMM for a fraction of the cost?

Laser scanning should only be done if absolutely mandatory. In my experience, the resultant models are anything but 'clean'.
No I'm not meaning a laser scan. A 3D scan is just done with cameras but in a 360 or 720 orbital sweep that renders a 3D photo that can then be used like a model to generate a work path.
 

helmbelly

Aluminum
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Location
New Orleans
Isn't this the same question ?:
Sorry if I cross posted, I can delete that first post - I rephrased it and thought it was more clear.
 

EPAIII

Diamond
Joined
Nov 23, 2003
Location
Beaumont, TX, USA
A very popular file format for 3D printing is the "STL" format, which Solidworks can easily export from a 3D model. I would think the STL file would be far more acceptable for making a 3D print than anything generated by any form of scanning. For one thing the STL file will have the dimensions built in to it. No need for a dimensioned drawing or even a statement of what the tolerances are. For another, most, probably all, 3D printer slicer programs need their input in that file format. So whatever a scanner provides would need to be converted to STL anyway.

Here is a quick search for 3D printing services. You have many to choose from. But you may want to repeat my search with the addition of your location as you probably have several local ones. You may even be able to get a prototype on same day basis.




Thanks for replies. In the past I made a wooden handgrip for moviecams that had aluminum attachments for adjusting and an electronic brain pocketed in the wood. It was complex for "wood" but I got a 3D scan of it which was converted to solidworks or a viewing format I'm forgettting. I used that to get quotes from CNC shops - the shop I went with made a workpathing formula for a small fee. So that was sorta my plan this time.

I have a drawing for our patent app, it's hand drawn but the part is simple and it's not hard to draw out. Yes I could just make a new drawing incorporating the present changes - but when getting hard quotes from CNC shops I seem to rememeber the first words out of everyones mouth was - do you have a scan but I think for a CNC shop a solidworks would be just as good. I dont know.

The hand grip I made was carved, it was all radii and more like sculpture than machined part. So maybe that's why we had to scan it. But CNC aside we are considering 3D printing and I believe a scan is prob the straightest route for making a workpath. A 3D solidwork file - is prob basically the same thing. I really don't know. I thought you could generate a .swk from a 3D scan but I don't know.
 

EPAIII

Diamond
Joined
Nov 23, 2003
Location
Beaumont, TX, USA
A bit more about tolerances with a 3D print. Yes, the dimensions are in the model and the STL file that the 3D printers use. But there are still tolerances. Plastic is heated and pushed out of a nozzle and a "noodle" is deposited. A number of factors can change the exact location of the sides and top of that noodle of plastic before it hardens. Not by a lot, but the sides and top of a 3D print can vary by a few thousandths.

Another thing that can happen is the overall part can shrink as the plastic cools. Again, not a lot. Probably less than 1%, but it does happen. And the amount will vary with different printing materials. Some plastics have been modified to minimize this shrinkage.

All of this can change the dimensions of your 3D printed part by a few thousandths of an inch, even by as much as 50 or more thousandths if the part is large enough. So if there are any critical dimensions in your part, then you may need to have the printing process adjusted or even the 3D model changed a bit to have them come out where you want. A good 3D printing service should be aware of this and be able to help in the process.

This probably would not be a problem with a part made of metal with machining processes like turning and milling. At least not with the tolerances that would be acceptable with a part like you are describing.
 

APD

Stainless
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Location
Hudson Valley, NY
I offered to create a 3D model and print it for him back when he posted the request. I have not received any pictures or drawings from him yet. Perhaps he found someone else?
 








 
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