What's new
What's new

Questions about my new-to-me South Bend 9"

Troy68

Plastic
Joined
Mar 24, 2024
Location
Ohio
Something I surely didn't "need"... but I've been thinking of getting a lathe and possibly a mill for a while. Like most total newbies, I was unsure about buying a Chinese "mini" anything vs "real" machinery (although even that is delineated by "hobby" level). I found this lathe advertised as a South Bend 9C. Naturally I wanted "bigger" because, well, everyone wants bigger - but quite often that also means an adventure in transportation, setup, and power requirements. The other lathes available recently were mostly 4 times the size and ran on 230V 3 phase. I wanted to get started right away without a lot of hassle, waiting on someone else, or having to complete 10 other tasks. I tried to educate myself but that was mostly on condition (worn ways, missing gear teeth, etc.). In any case, the seller thought it was early 1950s based on family history. I knew from my research that it should have had a badge for hardened ways and some letters in the serial # if it was that new(?). Now that I'm home... near as I can tell, this is a 1929 9" Model "O" with a 4 1/2 foot bed. Catalog # is 22-R and the Serial # is "44911 A". I didn't really read up on these until after I had it home.
 

Attachments

  • 424952774_122125687316169151_7970219784675085071_n.jpg
    424952774_122125687316169151_7970219784675085071_n.jpg
    103.7 KB · Views: 43
  • 428634559_122125679690169151_5848242671102252195_n.jpg
    428634559_122125679690169151_5848242671102252195_n.jpg
    115 KB · Views: 44
  • 428637283_122125679696169151_8999392425823179437_n.jpg
    428637283_122125679696169151_8999392425823179437_n.jpg
    102.2 KB · Views: 43
So some people might be like “I hope that didn’t cost you a lot”. Well, it came with all this (some I can’t identify).
 

Attachments

  • IMG_9758.jpeg
    IMG_9758.jpeg
    1.8 MB · Views: 25
  • IMG_9759.jpeg
    IMG_9759.jpeg
    2.2 MB · Views: 27
  • IMG_9769.jpeg
    IMG_9769.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 27
  • IMG_9770.jpeg
    IMG_9770.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 26
  • IMG_9771.jpeg
    IMG_9771.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 26
  • IMG_9772.jpeg
    IMG_9772.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 27
  • IMG_9773.jpeg
    IMG_9773.jpeg
    2.5 MB · Views: 29
  • IMG_9774.jpeg
    IMG_9774.jpeg
    2.3 MB · Views: 30
  • IMG_9775.jpeg
    IMG_9775.jpeg
    2.2 MB · Views: 28
  • IMG_9776.jpeg
    IMG_9776.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 26
More.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_9777.jpeg
    IMG_9777.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 16
  • IMG_9778.jpeg
    IMG_9778.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 16
  • IMG_9779.jpeg
    IMG_9779.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 16
Looking through the old catalog I can identify a few things...
 

Attachments

  • firefox_3KJpvYEwFg.png
    firefox_3KJpvYEwFg.png
    530.4 KB · Views: 7
  • firefox_NubaMfU0Qx.png
    firefox_NubaMfU0Qx.png
    283.6 KB · Views: 7
  • firefox_px9FZINSJd.png
    firefox_px9FZINSJd.png
    764.7 KB · Views: 7
  • firefox_zXwrbVZjSm.png
    firefox_zXwrbVZjSm.png
    576.1 KB · Views: 6
The thing next to the draw bar is an air/coolant nozzle. I'm not 100% sure how many change gears I'm supposed to have. There's no collets for the draw bar. Four chucks all together and several Jacobs chucks (not all look like they attach to the tail stock though). The little dials are nice and the set screws aren't stripped or anything. I think there's a follow rest, milling attachment, and taper attachment? But I need to research how that all goes together. I don't know what sort of paint is on it but it peels easily and the black coating underneath looks decent. I think the ways look good(?). No ridges that I can feel. There's very little (if any?) backlash in the apron. Unfortunately, during disassembly/moving, the handle for the belt tension broke which is very sad. Is that cast? Can I weld it? I hear these don't share a lot of parts with the later 9" models? Wondering if I got a museum piece or something useful. I have a few very simple projects in mind to start but if I knew what all I had I may expand my horizons.
 
Nice find. Looks like you have all the extras. I have a 1928 Junior (I think the Junior and Model O are the same). These are a bit beefier than the South Bend 9 A,B&C lathes that came along later. Here is mine:
 
If ysa plan to bench mount the lathe those cast iron legs may pay for part of the lathe . Folks go crazy & pay pretty good $$ for those " industrial legs "
 
Wondering if I got a museum piece or something useful. I have a few very simple projects in mind to start but if I knew what all I had I may expand my horizons.

Clean up the ways, oil everything that can be oiled, do the spindle lift test and adjust if possible.

Then just use the darn thing. It will work fine.
Each project will lead to better confidence and expanding understanding of new concepts & as-yet-unimagined-horizons.

Unfortunately, during disassembly/moving, the handle for the belt tension broke which is very sad. Is that cast? Can I weld it?

Read the posts on that subject (search "weld CI" or "weld cast iron" or "braze cast iron" etc)
Some of us believe brazing is the superior repair for CI. Many people do weld it with suitable rod, either gas weld or sometimes buzz box.

smt
 
Nice find. Looks like you have all the extras. I have a 1928 Junior (I think the Junior and Model O are the same). These are a bit beefier than the South Bend 9 A,B&C lathes that came along later. Here is mine:
Apparently some posts from my phone aren't actually making it to the thread...

I probably meant to say "Junior". When I searched the serial number database it seems like there are a fair number of 9" Juniors with 4 1/2' beds around the time mine was made. The story I got was the original purchaser made custom competition rifles. That may explain some of the accessories. I'll check out your thread.

Troy
 
For the moment, it's going to be mounted on those legs as I'm already limited on space and have no room for another bench. In reality, I have a huge garage but it's full. And I kind of like the look. I would like a tray though - which I guess could be easier with a bench.

Troy
 
Excellent find! That little workhorse will still do just about anything you'd like and with the belt drive, you can hear the radio!
Dang, look at the gear stack and the accessories you got with it! Large dials and a threading dial also... Drool.
A 1928 22-RC 9C lives here. It's bench model with short legs so a built-in chip tray but those legs are cool.
I hope you'll show a pic when you get it put together again!
On old 926 a 13X6 SB, I drilled and tapped for a 1/4" bolt or two that holds a home-built chip tray on the bottom that works good.
 
Last edited:
Without a mentor available, your forced into educating yourself. And the better job you do of that, the faster you'll progress. Much like Boxford in the UK, Hercus lathes in Australia made licensed copies of SB lathes and then improved and came up with there own and arguably better versions. They also produced an excellent book found here. http://www.opensourcemachinetools.org/archive-manuals/Hercus_TextBook_of_Turning.pdf that should answer most of the more entry level questions. And without that mentor, decent reference books really aren't optional in my opinion. You literally have to teach yourself enough to then understand what further questions to ask even on forums like this. It's also extremely helpful to sort out the hacks and who really knows what there doing on Youtube.
 
Just remember " experience is something ya don't have till the day after ya need it " .
Probably the biggest things I struggled with when I got my first lathe .
1 . Sharpening HSS
2 . Speeds & feeds
3 . Order of operations .
Took some time but I got to where I could sharpen & make some pretty nice chips . Speeds & feeds are also getting much better , but it still comes back to haunt me occasionally . Order of operations , that probably took the most thinking & made the most scrap . Just look at yer drawing from every angle ya can think of & then maybe a few more . Theres a couple thousand years os experience on this forum as a whole , doing searches here I have not only learned how to do what I was trying to figure out but in the process I almost always learn a few more things to file away for when needed.
animal
 
Sorry for missing replies to the last few posts but I've been offline for most of the Easter weekend. Just updating my post as I got the card from South Bend/Grizzly and it states "Catalog No. #422-RN" (the plate on the gear cover just says "22-R"). It does confirm "Type Lathe JR.BENCH, HOR.ADJ.MD", "Saddle JR", and "Apron JR". It also says "Date Shipped 2/10/37" which doesn't jive at all with the serial number database and would be several years after the Model O Junior production was converted to the more well known "Workshop" models (I believe?). It was sold directly to the customer. There's a second card that has the motor and switch data which gives me something else to verify.

Edit: I went back to look at the serial number database and there are actually some "Series O, 9-inch Junior" models later in the 1930s - but they also have higher serial numbers. Also I *think* the 'N' in "422-RN" means it's a horizontal motor drive so that makes sense. Or is it the '4'?

Troy
 
Last edited:
Sorry for missing replies to the last few posts but I've been offline for most of the Easter weekend. Just updating my post as I got the card from South Bend/Grizzly and it states "Catalog No. #422-RN" (the plate on the gear cover just says "22-R"). It does confirm "Type Lathe JR.BENCH, HOR.ADJ.MD", "Saddle JR", and "Apron JR". It also says "Date Shipped 2/10/37" which doesn't jive at all with the serial number database and would be several years after the Model O Junior production was converted to the more well known "Workshop" models (I believe?). It was sold directly to the customer. There's a second card that has the motor and switch data which gives me something else to verify.

Edit: I went back to look at the serial number database and there are actually some "Series O, 9-inch Junior" models later in the 1930s - but they also have higher serial numbers. Also I *think* the 'N' in "422-RN" means it's a horizontal motor drive so that makes sense. Or is it the '4'?

Troy
Your best bet is to post this on this thread (swells will answer your question, and probably will be very interested):
 
I have downloaded several of the old catalogs and parts lists. I'm looking at the 1936 Series "O" South Bend Lathes brochure. The section describing the "Junior" lathes says "The 9-inch Junior Lathe is built of the same units as the 9-inch Standard and Quick Change Gear Lathes (See Page 22). Headstock, tailstock, bed, saddle, compound rest, lead screw, workmanship and inspection tests are identical. No sacrifice in quality, accuracy, power, or durability has been made to obtain the remarkably low price of the 9-inch Junior Lathe. The large face plate, follower rest, center rest and thread cutting stop are omitted from the equipment of the Junior Lathe." So it seems weird to buy the cheap lathe only to also buy a large number of accessories - including ones that would have been included at a discount with a slightly more expensive model. This catalog also shows "22-R" (what the tag on mine says) as a "Floor Leg" countershaft driven model while "422-RN" (what the serial number card says) is a motor driven bench model. I'm thinking that mine may not have actually come with the legs (or the purchaser got the legs with all the other add-ons) as that would be easier to install legs and a plate for the motor than convert a countershaft model. Makes me wonder what the sales process was back then.

Yes, I know it's 100 years old and owners could have added parts that they found at yard/estate sales or even purchased from South Bend as their budget and skill improved.

Troy
 
Last edited:








 
Back
Top