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Questions For Moving a Free Clausing 5914

Tom Lipton machine trolly wheels, easy to move a lathe, not so keen with a mill, they always scare me,
Mark
 
If you have never moved a lathe know they are often top heavy and/or heavy one way so a little push or bumping a crack/bump in the floor when moving can topple one over to the front or back side

And steel on steel is like skates on ice so a machine can slide off forks (or the like) with just putting on the breaks.
 
Ya know, you can also just take it apart. You'll probably need to clean it anyway. I moved a 12" Logan out of a basement and it took maybe an hour to disassemble it into its major components. If you need to, use a cheapy hand truck for the heavier bits, headstock, bed, cabinet under headstock with the motor in it. If you bring a friend you won't even need the hand truck.
Looking at the lathe, it may be a little harder to disassemble than the Logan or a SB, but I'd sure give it a look over to see how hard that would be.
 
I have the opportunity to obtain a Clausing 5914 for free, I just need to go get it. The scenario is an estate cleanout; I'm good friends with the sister of the man who owned it. He rented space in a factory and had the lathe there. Now that he has passed on, the factory wants it gone ASAP. The family said I can have it if I can move it.

I had the chance to look at it months ago. It seems to have only had light use, the vari-speed drive seems to work correctly and isn't too loud, although I noted the resevoir was empty. The ways seem to have little wear. Mind you, I wasn't investigating it too closely because this was before I knew I had a good chance of getting it. And unfortunately, it's an hour and a half away from here and access to the premises is difficult. Hence, I'm coming here with a few questions for other Clausing 5914 owners.

I'm planning to make a wooden frame on which to bolt the lathe. Basically, 4x4s running perpendicular to the bed that will be through bolted to the machine feet. I will also take 2x4s running parallel to the bed and lag them to the topside of the 4x4s as stabilizers. Heavy duty casters will be bolted to the underside of the 4x4s at all four corners. I will lift one end of the lathe at a time with an engine hoist to install the 4x4s/casters. My thought is to widen the footprint of the lathe to give it more stability because I know they're top heavy and weigh roughly 1600lbs. From there, I hope to roll it out of the building which involves a long ramp, a step over the door threshold, and a small step down onto the pavement. Then use a winch to pull it up the trailer ramps onto a car trailer and strap it down.

Questions:

1) Can someone give me an accurate measurement of the center to center distance between the two headstock feet (measured perpendicular to the bed)? And the same measurement for the two tailstock feet?

2) A measurement of the distance between the headstock and tailstock feet. I will need to have the lumber precut.

3) Do the leveling screws thread right out of the feet? What diameter are they? Need to know what size bolts I can use to bolt through the feet.

4) Other advice on moving this? Getting it onto the trailer with ramps, a winch, and engine hoist? No forklift will be available for loading. Pictures of how you moved yours would be great.

5) I know there was a Yahoo Group for Clausing Lathes but now Yahoo Groups is dead. Did that group move elsewhere? I want to be able to use that resource.

Thanks!

TO move it, super easy, get a flat bed tow truck. pull it up and then slide it off the other end, its crazy what you can pull onto a flat bed tilt load. might only cost a couple hundred bucks.
 
I have never seen a machine mover with a wheeled prybar
https://www.amazon.com/BestEquip-Pr...ng+pry+bar&qid=1606949956&sr=8-22&tag=mh0b-20










Years ago I had never heard of this style bar so I made my own minus the fixed prybar. I welded a length of tubing instead so I could use whatever length bar I needed. Here are a few pics.
asset (2).jpegasset (3).jpegasset.jpeg

They have served me well over the years.

To the op, if you can get someone who is knowledgeable about moving and rigging to go with you would be best. If not take someone with good sense.

Personally I would use pipe to roll it and move it if you don't have any other means to get it out of the plant. As far as the incline take enough cable or strap to gently ease it down(or up) with a come along our something similar. Take several short pieces of 2x4 for blocking to get your pipes/framing underneath. Obviously take prybars and jacks. Move slowly and think everything through. Don't grab for if it's starts tipping over. And don't put yourself anywhere you could be pinched or trapped.

If you can get a rollback to haul it for 500 or less would be ideal. No loading or unloading necessary for you.

Good luck on your move.

Hodge
 
Thanks for all the advice everyone. I will ditch the caster idea and modify the skid design. I will use 4x4s, two 8ft ones running parallel to the bed, 34" from outside to outside. And two more 4x4s running perpendicular to which I will bolt the lathe feet. The leading edge of the 4x4s will get a nice big chamfer and I will use a combination of 1.25" iron pipe as rollers, a come-along, engine hoist, jacks, and a pallet jack to get out of the building. Once outside, we will use the winch mounted on the trailer to drag the skid up onto the trailer. It looks like the weight of the 5914 is more like 1100-1200lbs, not 1600 as originally thought.

I will have the help of two or three other guys besides me.
 
Thanks for all the advice everyone. I will ditch the caster idea and modify the skid design. I will use 4x4s, two 8ft ones running parallel to the bed, 34" from outside to outside. And two more 4x4s running perpendicular to which I will bolt the lathe feet. The leading edge of the 4x4s will get a nice big chamfer and I will use a combination of 1.25" iron pipe as rollers, a come-along, engine hoist, jacks, and a pallet jack to get out of the building. Once outside, we will use the winch mounted on the trailer to drag the skid up onto the trailer. It looks like the weight of the 5914 is more like 1100-1200lbs, not 1600 as originally thought.

I will have the help of two or three other guys besides me.

I moved my (now former) 5914 across my workshop garage on 2x4s and 1/2 inch water pipe rollers (1/2 inch because a I had a number of drops readily available). For the most part I could move it with a fairly strong heave. A few weeks ago I moved the lathe back to the other side of the garage to get it under the crane to be able to load it onto the buyer's pickup. This last time I only used 1 2x4 per side. It was more difficult to roll - guessing that there was more wood fiber compression with only one 2x4 edge per side. Pics of the first move with double 2x4: IMAG1194.jpgIMAG1195.jpg

After the Clausing was out I moved the replacement Summit 1440 on pipe rollers, but without a skid underneath, since both lathe pedestals were longer. A significant challenge to move a 3000+ lb Summit vs the 1250 lb Clausing. I had to use my 5 ft long pry bar, moving 2 inches at a time, digging into the crappy soft concrete.
 
I have used a 2 ton shop crane (engine hoist) to move a couple of lathes and it works like a charm. You just roll the thing under the lathe, find the approximate center of balance, sling it around a couple of ribs, and begin to pick up slowly, see which way to adjust the sling to balance, set it down - readjust sling - pick it back up and back your trailer under it. Once it is on the trailer - you can "pinch" it into place - or use the pipe rollers under it.

I just recently lifted a 5,000lb lathe with the shop crane on one side and a tractor with forks on the other end. Make sure you get it strapped down good for the ride home. If it is your trailer, and you have a wood floor on it, I would run some lags through the skid into the floor as well as strapping it down. Never think that you don't have that far to go so no need to be overly careful with the strapping - bad idea - always use plenty of straps. More is better. I like what moonlight told me years ago - you can never have enough straps!
 
I recently picked up a 5902 Clausing. I used timbers bolted to the feet and then used small diameter pipe to roll it on. One person can easily accomplish movement this way. Have several pipes available so you can index them back to front as needed. If your trailer ramp is expanded metal, cover it with plywood to spread the load more evenly and also prevent snagging/catching. You will have to increase the diameter of your pipe when you load due to incline clearance. Be careful not to exert excessive side pull when loading up the ramp. Doing so could easily break the pedestal/feet on the machine.
 
I second disassembly, if no forklift on site. I have to disassemble to get anything into my basement anyway. The heavy parts can roll on HF car dollies, but they MUST be firmly strapped to the part. Wooden frames help. Engine crane. Winches. 4x4 ramps. Pry bars. I have moved the following this way, largely unassisted: Logan 820 lathe, Bridgeport 1J mill, Hardinge HCT lathe, Bostomatic 300 bed mill, Springfield 16" lathe (moved on sleds in the snow), Van Norman 1RQ-3-22 mill, Gemco 16 universal shaper, Cincinatti #2 TC&G.

Reassembly is a good time to fix anything that needs repair and you will quickly gain intimate knowledge of your machine.

Prerequisits: A plan, tools, time, access, patience. It will always take longer than you think it will.
 
This is tangential but related. My 5914 is long gone.

The way the bed is cast the "ports" are on an angle towards the rear and not vertically up and down. This makes slinging thru the bed casting NOK with just straps on-hand.

Forks wont fit between the chip pan and the bottom of the bed casting.

If you simply wrap the bed casting in a "basket" sling configuration you will bend the clutch shaft and/or leadscrew like a banana.

Based on these limitations I made a lifting rig for the lathe, mostly cobbled together from some long bolts and aluminum pads to protect the actual top side of the ways. Hopefully it saves someone else a little time and possibly aggravation later.

clausing_5914_liftingframe_01.JPG


clausing_5914_liftingframe_02.JPG


clausing_5914_liftingframe_03.JPG
 
The safe way to use a crane is to place a couple of 4x4 s across the wheel arms ,and lower the lathe until the weight is mostly taken by the wheel arms ,but dont let the lift come loose .....Its then safe ,and will not tip over as when the weight is fully suspended.,nor overload the jib every time you hit a bump.
 
Having owned and moved 4 5914's I can say it isnt a big deal to move them safely.

Of course watch for ramps, steps and other obstacles.

Building a frame with casters or rollers does work.

But on the other hand cheap-io furniture dollies can do the trick as well.

Ill offer this picture from a little over 10 years ago.
Lathe1.jpg


Same dollies under a different 5914
P5180826.jpg

The smaller dolley is still in use holding a 5914 headstock.

I upgraded the dollies with a couple made of metal
20201215_144359.jpg

If possible consider rol-a-lift dollies.
 








 
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