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Quill lock 'normal position'

oceanobob

Plastic
Joined
May 18, 2014
Location
Oceano, CA
Had the opportunity to be one of the first visitors to a local machine shop that had recently closed. There were several vertical mills, mostly all mfg by Bridgeport. A few lathes, surface grinder, universal tool sharpener etc also in the shop. All machines were reasonably cleaned and the floor was swept, the work mats were still there, and no machined items parts etc to be seen - and as a general comment there was no tooling in any of the machines. Machines had power available.

After I investigated a lathe, and disconnected one which was being sold, I went to check out the Bridgeports - they mostly were with a typical vice that was installed but empty, no tooling was in the machine, and a small tray with about a dozen collets was on most of the machines.
I noticed every one had the Quill Locked. All the locks worked and I was able to release the lock as is usual, but it made me curious.
By any chance would this be demonstrative of a shop policy to operate the machine using the knee (only) and no usage of the quill? Or was this likely just something done by the person(s) who cleaned the shop.
 
Was the spindle empty? I tend to lock the quill during a tool change.
That habit was formed after using a air actuated drawbar for a number of years. Now it’s a muscle memory reaction, even on a machine without a power drawbar.
 
The quill on mine is locked when doing milling operations except for plunges. If you don't lock it, what keeps it from pulling itself into the work?
 
I thought this was going to be a thread about reversing the direction of the quill lock.

Regardless of changing Z with the knee vs. quill I was taught that if the quill isn’t in the act of changing Z then it should be locked. The exception is when traversing the table while drilling multiple holes. Out of habit I even lock it, just barely, when using an edge finder.
 
Regardless of changing Z with the knee vs. quill I was taught that if the quill isn’t in the act of changing Z then it should be locked. The exception is when traversing the table while drilling multiple holes. Out of habit I even lock it, just barely, when using an edge finder.

Yep, same here. Including slight locking for edge finder use; just in case the lock pushes or pulls X/Y location slightly.

I was thinking the titular question was asking where the quill lock knob was pointing while in its locked position.
 
Good habit to get into, locking the quill. It seems none of the Bridgeports I have run ever had the clock spring wound as tight as a drill press (nor would I want it that tight). So, with a heavy drill chuck and drill installed, there is a real risk of having it come crashing down while both hands are busy moving the table to the next location, which is guaranteed to ruin your day. Especially bad if you have a repositionable handle installed on the quill feed.

Dennis
 
Good habit to get into, locking the quill. It seems none of the Bridgeports I have run ever had the clock spring wound as tight as a drill press (nor would I want it that tight). ...

Dennis
The clock spring is not intended to retract the quill like on a drill press. It's only there to keep the quill from falling from its own weight.
 








 
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