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Quote for scraping job on hobby mill

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addman16

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Oct 11, 2017
Hey guys I’m a local Long Island NY, hobbyist who needs to have the ways and gibs scraped on my table, they came from the factory unmated/unscrapped.

The mill I have is the: G0704

I purchased it to do a cnc upgrade and I don’t really have the ability to scrape it myself. I don’t think I have the time or patience to dedicate to scraping.

Here’s a link to my machine

www.grizzly.com/products/grizzly-7-x-27-1-hp-mill-drill-with-stand/g0704

To give you a better idea here’s a parts diagram:

cdn0.grizzly.com/partslists/g0704_pl.pdf

I need the ways and gibs scrapped on part# 1, 48, 68, 76, 54.

How much would a job like this cost? Would it end up being more than what the machine is worth?

If so would you be able to kindly point me in the right direction on what you think the best course of action would be.

Would be great if I could find somebody local, started sending out feelers, but don’t mind shipping either since the parts aren’t relatively that heavy.

Right now I have a $2k paper weight and need to have this done.
 
Before you get jumped on and insulted beyond what is necessary :D you need to post this on a hobby forum. And in the interim put your big boy boots on and prepare for some push back.
 
I don’t think I have the time or patience to dedicate to scraping.
Check out Richard King's posts on classes, before you know you will have a workshop full of vintage iron and a really black face and hands all overlaid with spotting blue. You'll be a expert on arcane subject's like the viscosity of various brands of spotting blue, diamond laps, carbide vs HSS scrapers and as to whether push or pull scraping is preferred. Then we get to the ultimate pissing contest, which Biax do you own.

Embrace the pain. It is actually a really good skill to have.
 
On your list of parts to be scraped, you should add 17, 70, and 72.
I second the suggestion of you learning how to scrape, since the quotes you would receive will likely surpass the cost of the mill, assuming that you will find somebody willing to do it.
Given the dimensions and the geometry, likely it will be done exclusively by hand scraping and, the farther it is from "matching", will require a significant amount of hours to guarantee good contact and perfect alignment.

Paolo
 
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Right now I have a $2k paper weight and need to have this done.
Have you actually ever paid a qualified professional to do work before?????? If so you know a plumber charges $150 +/- per hour. An auto shop mechanic $100-$150 dollars an hour. An electrician maybe $100-$150 an hour.

Now how many hours of work do you think it will take a qualified expert to scrape your parts?????

Are you really willing to pay a professional to scrape that cheap Chinese iron??????

How much are you willing to put into your paper weight???

Maybe now it is starting to dawn on you why commercial quality machines cost so much more than Chinese paper weights.
 
Maybe now it is starting to dawn on you why commercial quality machines cost so much more than Chinese paper weights.
This is stupid bullshit. Grizzly stuff is meant for people to make little knick-knacks in the garage, and they work fine for that. They are perfectly suitable for their purpose.

If he wants/needs something a little more upscale (why ? for real or just boasting ?) then he'll have to figure out how to get there and like a fool he came here asking a simple question, not requesting snarky crap.

The simple answer is, too much. Learn to do it yourself if you really need more than the little drill-mill came with.
 
So, you say it is un-scraped, and un-matched. Okay.

What objective measurements or observations cause you to believe the machine is not properly aligned etc?

Mind, I do not disbelieve the assertion that it is unscraped and un-matched, I am just asking how you have verified that there are problems.

That might be observations that a part milled to a 90 degree angle actually turns out to be 89 degrees, or any other non-90 degree angle. It might be that no amount of gib adjustment can take out the slop in the table, or in the head, etc. A number attached to that in terms of thousandths of an inch of uncorrectable movement would help with the second of those.

Essentially, you need to know what is wrong, and how wrong it is, before you can begin to decide how it can be corrected. Or if it even needs to be corrected.

EmGo is correct in saying that most use them as-is, and do fine. Maybe they are not fussy, or maybe yours is way worse. But if yours is bad, HOW bad is it?

I recently did an entire mill, probably not that different in size to yours. It took a long time. It was my mill, so I did not keep track of hours, and did not do it all at one time. I should have kept track, so I could respond with a reasonable time estimate based on facts.

As a "WAG", I would guesstimate I spent in total somewhere around two work weeks and some overtime on it, going through every sliding surface, and doing all the alignments. It gets used a good bit, and I recently went through and touched up some areas where there was more wear than I figured. That was a much shorter time, but it really involved a lot less work.

The good news for you is that the thing is probably reasonably close, it hopefully is not as bad as a machine with 65 years of wear on it. So it should take a shorter time.

The bad news for you is that those machines seem to be machined as individual parts in different departments, and then assembled. At least, respectable folks who know more about scraping than I do have found some really bad contact between parts on machines from the same sources that they worked on. Things like slides that contact at opposite corners only, etc.

That machine also seems to have tapered gibs, which adds time, especially if one of them needs to be re-made due to running out of adjustment room. That would depend on how much scraping is needed to "bring it into" alignment.

I have personally found "precision" levels from the same company as your machine, where the bottom surface of the level was only contacting a granite flat on three corners. Yes, that is very, very, bad.

Those sorts of problem are the kind of things you mostly find only on worn machines They take much more time to fix than simple touch-up scraping to bring a decent alignment to a very good one..

I would not want to do the job, myself. I have other things to do. But based on my experience with my own machinery, you would be looking at serious cash even if you assume that a professional was more than twice as efficient as I am.

Even if you assume a professional could do it in 1/4 my time, basically a half a week's work, and figure only $100 per hour (good luck with that), your 2 grand machine would cost another 2 grand for a full job.

For that, and the investment of some time, you could get sufficient equipment (with some wise purchasing) and learn scraping so you could deal with that, and future machines. Maybe you do not have time. It either takes your time, or your money, your choice.

IF it actually needs to be done at all.
 
If mill is “out” by large amount send it back to grizzly. They do a pretty good job of standing behind their product specs.
 
And then you have a machine with the ways up to spec And now comes the fun part The spindle
I can sell you a decent Deckel FP1 about50 years old for about 3x the new price of your machine Not perfect on its ways eighter But spindle is good And if you take time to get the ways decent you end up with a really good machine



Peter
 
And then you have a machine with the ways up to spec And now comes the fun part The spindle
I can sell you a decent Deckel FP1 about50 years old for about 3x the new price of your machine Not perfect on its ways eighter But spindle is good And if you take time to get the ways decent you end up with a really good machine



Peter

If this is the machine you showed pics of on the Deckel thread, I’d take it on as a project if it was local. No way I’m going to deal with shipping that distance, but do think a guy would at least wind up with a useful tool after rebuilding. Wouldn’t want to bother rescraping the OP’s machine. Sorry.
 
Wouldn’t want to bother rescraping the OP’s machine. Sorry.
Ekchully, as a first project, the mill-drill would probably be better. Have at it, learn something, if you mess it up no big deal .... I also think a person's first car should be something of a beater. Beginners aren't known for a high skill level. Gotta start somewhere, better on a yugo than a bentley.
 
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