What's new
What's new

Reading Suggestions

Gorby

Plastic
Joined
Aug 13, 2022
What are some go-to resources for general machining knowledge and strength of materials information, primarily in metalworking? I’m looking to get into machining as a hobby and would like to give my brain a head start until my wallet can afford equipment.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Diamond
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
I like shopping at used book stores, and library book sales, you never know what you will find, and some are a wealth of information you just won't find anywhere else. If you have not read it yet "How to run a lathe" is a good primer for anyone wanting to learn, and it is available online. "Machinery's Handbook" is another must-have book, you don't have to memorize, you just need to know where to find answers to questions in it.
 

boslab

Titanium
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Location
wales.uk
Go to vintage machinery, Mr Keith Rucker has been making digitised of lots of engineering books not available anymore ( mores the pity) worth a look,
Treatse on milling is brilliant, how to run a lathe, atlas
Go look, I’ve been reading workshop books for 55 years, still learning, just finished one from 1856, how to shorten a connecting rod ! ( heat cycling ) was just one chapter, there’s a wealth of stuff out there, much is pdf now
Mark
 

Marty Feldman

Titanium
Joined
Feb 21, 2005
Location
Owl's Head, Maine
"General machining knowledge" and "strength of materials" are two separate areas, not likely to be addressed in any one book designed for people looking to get into machining as a hobby. For the former, consider seriously


Be sure to get both volumes.

For the latter, a lot will depend upon what your aims are and how technical you want to get.

-Marty-
 

Gorby

Plastic
Joined
Aug 13, 2022
"General machining knowledge" and "strength of materials" are two separate areas, not likely to be addressed in any one book designed for people looking to get into machining as a hobby. For the former, consider seriously


Be sure to get both volumes.

For the latter, a lot will depend upon what your aims are and how technical you want to get.

-Marty-
Maybe I wasn’t clear enough. I understand they are two separate areas and am looking for recommendations for both areas. For strength of materials I am looking for a general understanding as well as a more in-depth study on how different steels hold up to pressures and tensile strength.
 

wood2steel

Aluminum
Joined
May 17, 2013
Location
georgia
Gordy, send me a PM, I'll get you a list of some 15 to 20 books I have come across on ebay that have guided me over the last 20+ years, in addition to the priceless instructions from the veteran Machinist I was so fortunate to be exposed to. I believe their were 1 or 2 manuals that focused on those Metallurgy issues.
Good luck! Johnny
 

dian

Titanium
Joined
Feb 22, 2010
Location
ch
maybe you should start with some engineering book. at least i wish i had. e.g. tensile strenght is rarely what matters (→fatique strenght, shear strenght, buckling, youngs modulus, embrittlement (ssc/hydrogen), ductile to brittle transition temp, etc.). did you know a set screw (high strenghth) cannot be used in tension? you can look at quantitative info all day, but your just loosing time without the basics.

as to intro to machining, try blondihacks on youtube, if you like it.
 

Gorby

Plastic
Joined
Aug 13, 2022
maybe you should start with some engineering book. at least i wish i had. e.g. tensile strenght is rarely what matters (→fatique strenght, shear strenght, buckling, youngs modulus, embrittlement (ssc/hydrogen), ductile to brittle transition temp, etc.). did you know a set screw (high strenghth) cannot be used in tension? you can look at quantitative info all day, but your just loosing time without the basics.

as to intro to machining, try blondihacks on youtube, if you like it.
Do you have any recommendations in that area? That sounds like an excellent idea. I have watched a few of her videos and they have been very informative.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
Maybe I wasn’t clear enough. I understand they are two separate areas and am looking for recommendations for both areas. For strength of materials I am looking for a general understanding as well as a more in-depth study on how different steels hold up to pressures and tensile strength.
Plenty of online information on materials.



 

dian

Titanium
Joined
Feb 22, 2010
Location
ch
this covers both to some extend and its available online (1733 p.):

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
HANDBOOK
METALLIC MATERIALS AND ELEMENTS FOR
AEROSPACE VEHICLE STRUCTURES
 

guythatbrews

Cast Iron
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
Location
MO, USA
What a great hobby you are starting to explore. And kudos one thinking first. Seems this is an antiquated idea these days.

Machinery's handbook does delve into strength of materials without getting into calculus. Anybody thinking about machine work needs this tome.

I like Atlas's "Manual of Lathe Operation" for learning about running an engine lathe.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
Machining books never seemed very exciting to me.

In the interest of materials and machining I suggest toolmaking:


This is one of the most used books in my shop. It is absurd that it is $12 delivered. This is a big book and well written.

Take an average machine shop, add a nice stamping press or three, that book and a motivated individual and you have a recipe to make a lot of money today.

I have given this book as a gift several times, very well received. I should buy a few more copies at $12/ea. That's just nuts.
 

Pathogen

Hot Rolled
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
I would recommend you use the internet

There are hobby machinist sites that yak about everything

Look local in adult education classes for metal working, welding, and mechanical drawing

There are still libraries scattered around that have printed matter with pictures
 








 
Top