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Reconditioning My HLV-H

M Kiser

Aluminum
Joined
Apr 21, 2014
Location
Southern Indiana
After a lot of time spent learning how to scrape and finishing my 18" Martin straight edge, I think I'm ready to start working on my HLV-H. While I would love to surface grind the external surfaces that Hardinge ground originally, I have no access to a grinder at all. I made a clean up pass with a big fly cutter to the bottom of the compound base and was pleased with the look. Then I did the same for the top of the slide and it looked dull and lifeless. Different materials? One thought is to finish the flycut surface with a criss cross scraping pass for cosmetics, but the sample part I did didn't look real great to me either. Advice would be appreciated! Pictures attached.PXL_20231112_163620974.jpgPXL_20231112_162711357.jpgPXL_20231112_162522506.jpg
 
They should be either ground or scraped. Those are working surfaces, not just cosmetic. A fly cut surface might be suitable for a vise.
You should be able to get a better finish than that with your fly cutter though. Those tool marks will be hard to scrape through. Do you have a picture of your fly cutter?
 
They should be either ground or scraped. Those are working surfaces, not just cosmetic. A fly cut surface might be suitable for a vise.
You should be able to get a better finish than that with your fly cutter though. Those tool marks will be hard to scrape through. Do you have a picture of your fly cutter?
See below.
 

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They should be either ground or scraped. Those are working surfaces, not just cosmetic. A fly cut surface might be suitable for a vise.
You should be able to get a better finish than that with your fly cutter though. Those tool marks will be hard to scrape through. Do you have a picture of your fly cutter?
The tool marks aren’t too bad. What I don’t like is the dull appearance. It seems to be the nature of the material. Although the compound base looked pretty good for some reason. Do you think it’s necessary to have high precision on the external surfaces of the compound? I like something good enough for an indicator base but beyond that I have never cared. Many lathes are painted in those areas so a fly cut surface would be a big improvement in my opinion.
 
Yes it is necessary! Even if for only cosmetics. It is a hardinge!. A level above toolroom lathe IMO

Besides the principal of it:
You need to use those surfaces for as datum/references for scraping the remainder of the compound in.
How are you going to check for parallel? To the rough flycut surface? Are you going to shim it so it sits flat on the surface plate because I doubt it sits flat now.
How are you going to get the compound ways level to the bed if the compound base is only rough machined. No good for turning accurate tapers if the tool doesn't travel parallel to the bed. Plus it will twist and bind up when you bolt it to the saddle if it does not have 100% contact.

I guess you COULD scrape the ways without those surfaces scraped or ground but what the heck is the point
 
Good point about reference for future scraping. In fact, the Connelly book suggests scraping the top of the slide first for that very reason. I did scrape the bottom surface of the base flat (pic attached) but can't do any more on that until the slide is done. Does that scraping seem adequate for mating to the top of the cross slide?
The idea of scraping the entire compound isn't too daunting, but the idea of doing the cross slide, carriage and apron seems like an awful lot. And I'm not sure how it would look. I've seen pictures of watchmaker/clockmaker lathes done that way but don't know how it would look on an HLV-H. Has anyone seen such?
 

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I finished the top and bottom surfaces of the compound slide and am pretty happy with the results. For both surfaces, a tenths indicator shows 0 to -.0001". I'm a little surprised that they came in that close! I plan to scrape the straight dovetail next. Can I trust the side of the slide body as a reference surface for scraping the dovetail straight? It appears to have been ground by Hardinge and I can't imagine it not being straight.....but? It will require some sort of sliding holder for holding a gage pin tangent to the flat sliding surface to check the dovetail as I scrape it.
Comments and thoughts please!
PXL_20231126_194206351.jpgPXL_20231123_012415736.jpg
 
Best not to assume anything. If you can measure it, you should try to do so. The scraping looks like you really put a lot of effort into it, but close up it looks a little chattery. That doesn't necessarily mean there's anything wrong with it, but there may be an issue with the grind angle or sharpness of you blades.
 
Best not to assume anything. If you can measure it, you should try to do so. The scraping looks like you really put a lot of effort into it, but close up it looks a little chattery. That doesn't necessarily mean there's anything wrong with it, but there may be an issue with the grind angle or sharpness of you blades.
It is indeed chattery. But I’m keeping a very close eye on the cutting edge. Many trips to the 2000 grit lapping wheel at -5 degrees. Should I try a different angle? Finer grit?
 
One possible source of the chatter is my home made power scraper. I designed it with the blade angle 20 degrees down from the stroke direction. This was based on trying to measure pictures of a Biax. Not very accurate I know, but I don’t have access to one to make an accurate measurement.
 
It is indeed chattery. But I’m keeping a very close eye on the cutting edge. Many trips to the 2000 grit lapping wheel at -5 degrees. Should I try a different angle? Finer grit?
Try a different attack angle with your scraper first as that's the easiest thing to do. It also may be that your home built tool needs some ballast, add some mass to the tool to increase the amount of force being transferred to the work. Worst case, it is an artifact of the way you are transmitting power from the motor to the blade. The BIAX has a lot of reduction gearing between the motor and the wobbler. If the easy stuff doesn't help, then experimenting with some different grind angles may be worth a try.
 
One possible source of the chatter is my home made power scraper. I designed it with the blade angle 20 degrees down from the stroke direction. This was based on trying to measure pictures of a Biax. Not very accurate I know, but I don’t have access to one to make an accurate measurement.
I just did a quick measurement, and the BIAX blade angle is indeed about 20°, so that's not likely to be the issue. Let me know if you need any dimensions, I'm happy to take them for you.
 
I made the sliding holder (pic attached) for measuring the parallelism between the dovetail and the ground external surface of the slide body. From end to end there is about .002" difference. Since there are visible grooves in the dovetail surface I attribute it to wear. Does that seem reasonable? I'm not seeing any other reference surfaces to work with. PXL_20231127_213418797.jpg
 








 
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