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Requesting Recommendations for a Robust Goose-neck Clamp Lamp

dgfoster

Diamond
Joined
Jun 14, 2008
Location
Bellingham, WA
As winter comes on, my shop is cooler now and chemical processes like the curing of epoxy glue and Bondo (both of which I use often in casting pattern making) are slowed down because of lower ambient temps. I have recently acquired some simple screw-base ceramic heat emitters which work well for local application of modest heat. But, positioning them in the crappy ball-joint "clamp lamp" holders is shaky at best. I see many goose-neck clamp-on light bulb/ceramic heater holders online. But, without handling them, knowing which ones have sturdy necks is impossible. I am looking for users' experience with such holders that they feel are sturdy and whose necks remain in position well after positioning. I have had both good and bad experiences with goose-neck LED lights some of which hold position nicely and others which want to wander out of position as soon as you take your hand off.

The heaters weigh perhaps a half pound and so require a more than average strength neck. I am also open to considering some heater holding solution if someone knows of such. I do need something other than a simple hanging solution as the parts I heat often must be positioned at specific angles for curing.

Below is clipped image of the heaters I am presently using.
1698538545863.png

Thanks for any help you can offer.

Denis
 
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look at the pantagraph type, maybe hard to find now with an ordinary socket.
Thanks for your response.

My experience with Pantograph clamp lamps has been awful. They have tended to not hold position, the joint clamping screws were way too light as were the tubes that make up the arms. I am looking for recommendations for specific brands/models. I take it you do not have a specific brand/model to suggest.

Denis
 
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Denis, an articulated locking arm as used in photography (and also on Noga indicator stands!) might serve. They often come with a photo-style heavy clamp at the base end, and you could replace the other end with something shop-made to hold an socket for the heater.

I am thinking of something like this. I've got one and its claimed load capacity just meets your requirement. I'm confident the claim is realistic. You could replace the last link (ball and 1/4-20 attachment) to hold your heater.
 
Mr Foster, would it be possible to attach the bulb sockets to magnetic indicator bases?
You can get import mag bases fairly cheap on ebay. Longer segments could be made from bar stock; or even tubing, in which case you may be able to run the power cord through the tube. Using mag base components would give you a modular platform with positive locks at each joint.
 
It is getting harder to find lamps with Edison sockets. Most today are LEDs with no socket so you can't change the lamps. I did buy some articulated lamps some months ago and I am converting them to hanging lamps for video purposes. They do have Edison sockets and screw clamps.


Another way would be to buy the Walmart/hardware store clamp on work lights you mention and use coolant hose to convert them. The coolant hose will support a fair amount of weight and has a hole down the middle which a cord can be passed through.
 
A search for Magic Arm turns up all sorts of holding devices including arms resembling Noga indicator holders -
The coolant hose will support a fair amount of weight and has a hole down the middle which a cord can be passed through.
Snake lights like Dewalt etc. sell do exactly that, they use large loc-line with wires in the center and a rubber covering for appearance.
 
Thanks for your response.

My experience with Pantograph clamp lamps has been awful. They have tended to not hold position, the joint clamping screws were way too light as were the tubes that make up the arms. I am looking for recommendations for specific brands/models. I take it you do not have a specific brand/model to suggest.

Denis
older ones were heavier duty. perhaps thrift store? anyways I second looking at the studio lighting gear. there are or where very cheap lights on Amazon.
 
Jeesh! Lots of really good ideas above. Now I've gone from wondering if there is a solution to the problem to having a hard time deciding on which option to choose. I am presently leaning to the arm linked a couple times above similar to this.
1698585788546.png

It will not take much work to make a decent looking adaptor to hold a ceramic Edison socket using that 1/4-20 screw. I plan to have 3 or so units that I can mount on convenient locations so that I can warm up an area larger than can be covered by a single heater. (Summertime pattern making is so sweet as just taking the piece outside into the sunlight is so effective in accelerating cure time.)

Being able to warm a surface coated with paint, Bondo, or Epoxy from 50F to 120F means I can apply a fillet to a pattern and have it cure in minutes for Bondo and 3 hours for common 1:5 (as opposed to "5-Minute"). That means a lot shorter intervals between pattern-building and fairing step.

Thank you all for your excellent replies!

Denis
 
A search for Magic Arm turns up all sorts of holding devices including arms resembling Noga indicator holders -

Snake lights like Dewalt etc. sell do exactly that, they use large loc-line with wires in the center and a rubber covering for appearance.
Good answer here. I don’t know about the asian knock offs that show up in that search, but the Manfrotto magic arms are very high quality and work extremely well. Also look at the Manfrotto arms that swivel and slide. Those would be very good for what you are asking. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=magic+ar...ronics,166&tag=practforum-20&ref=nb_sb_noss_1
 
Good answer here. I don’t know about the asian knock offs that show up in that search, but the Manfrotto magic arms are very high quality and work extremely well. Also look at the Manfrotto arms that swivel and slide. Those would be very good for what you are asking. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=magic+arm&i=electronics&crid=20QT4P27DL165&sprefix=magic+arm,electronics,166&tag=practforum-20&ref=nb_sb_noss_1
Yes, a decade or two ago when I was very interested in large-format photography, I had some Manfrotto gear---it was top quality stuff manufactured to high standards, convenient to use, and very sturdy.

Denis
 
There are a lot of very decent Cheap as Dirt options out there now - as posted above. I see those on ebay US ship for $12.

Watch out for plastic in critical areas - like the clamp that squeezes the ball joint. It can break at any time, especially in cold temps or changing temps- even if you don't get one with porosity in the plastic. It's hard to tell the material in photos. If you're using heat lamps, an unattended failure could be a big deal. Or having a light support break and drop into a machine.

In the film industry, Manfrotto Super Clamps are frequently used to hold lighting lighting, etc. They're heavy and well built. I have a few of them, model 035RL. They use standard mounting studs for attachment (of arms, extensions, other clamps, etc). They aren't cheap, but they have good residual value and a robust used market.

 
Watch out for plastic in critical areas - like the clamp that squeezes the ball joint. . It's hard to tell the material in photos. If you're using heat lamps, an unattended failure could be a big deal. Or having a light support break and drop into a machine.
Good points, so, I looked at the reviews and here is one indicating the clamps are metal.
"I like this arm a lot. It's all metal - a good thing - and it stays where you put it. At first I thought it was sort of flimsy but once I got it set up it works very well. I use it to hold a cell phone that I use as a camera."

A couple good things about the about the ceramic emitters are that they produce a more diffuse and gentler warming than the old red heater light bulbs and their surface temperature is not nearly as high. So, I do not think they could ignite common flammable materials. Still, I do not make a practice of leaving heating units on unattended.

I did a search on the fire risk and OSHA has no regulatory concerns and the manufacturers state they cannot start a fire. So, the risk should be low.

Denis
 
That 22" JEBUTU setup looks very nice but I just noticed the max weight is .25 kg. That's only 8 oz. That is surprisingly low. I thought the individual clamp style joints would be more robust than the noga style single adjust. Also noticed the 22" length is based on the clamp length, so that isn't a true 22".

This single adjust style is only 11" but the max weight is 2kg.

 
That 22" JEBUTU setup looks very nice but I just noticed the max weight is .25 kg. That's only 8 oz. That is surprisingly low. I thought the individual clamp style joints would be more robust than the noga style single adjust. Also noticed the 22" length is based on the clamp length, so that isn't a true 22".

This single adjust style is only 11" but the max weight is 2kg.

The actual weight of the emitter is 5 oz. I am going to give the 22" a try. The extra adjustment range would prove useful in many setups. If it is not up to the job, I'll return it.

Denis
 








 
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