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Rivett 608 - is this a parts machine or not missing too much?

Yep, the accessories need to fit the "square corner" bed.

And, of course, the issue of finding them for a rare (only 3000 ever made) lathe, not all of which had any given accessory.

More of course than 3000 if you include 8" precision, I don't have numbers for them.
 
As the recipient of the 5C 608 that smt passed on last month, I'm elbow deep in removing 50 years of grime and grit. Thankfully no kibble, but the lathe suffered had a serious lack of maintenance. I'm not ready to measure the bed wear yet, but the worst I've found is neglect and some abuse.

Somebody dropped the cross slide at some point and there was a 35 thousands bend in the lead screw. With some careful work the bend is just a slight wobble and the cross-slide nut has 22 thou backlash (vs. the compound which has 9 thou). Only three odd fasteners have needed to be made so far.

I'm hoping that for my precision needs, the bed won't need a rework like JST's. Unfortunately, I'm still a few weeks away from moving it into my shop as other projects are required to clear a spot.

While a cabinet full of rare accessories would be a treat and would certainly increase the lathe's functionality/value, I expect that it will still be a great user lathe. I'm not doing production work and the over-engineered nature of the 608 is a treat to work on.

I'm going to need to remake half the back-gear and replace some missing teeth on the bull-gear. Nothing insurmountable or even surprising for a 1945 lathe. I expect I'll be another Rivett lathe owner fighting for the limited supply of parts and accessories, but I'm used to doing that for my Aciera F1 mill.
 
I have been visiting the Henry Ford Museum since about 1954. For the first twenty or thirty years of that time, I used to gaze longingly at a display with no signage consisting of fine old oak cabinets/benches with neat old small (not miniature) machine tools. A friend who had connections at the museum told me that they were from Henry's personal hobby shop. I think that shop was over the garage at his Fairlane mansion. The lathe was a Rivett, either an 8" precision or a 608. Billionaires (in today's money) do not buy junk and Henry had an eye for good tools. The display disappeared in the 1980's along with dozens of old engines and was replaced by people with degrees in "modern" museum display theory. The new displays are very nice, but I preferred to see the stuff Henry had placed there.

Larry
The idea of that is so strange to me. They are obviously well-endowed, they don't need to worry about space. Why not keep what their founder thought was important and add to it, rather than replacing it? It seems so antithetical to idea of preserving the past, and specifically telling the story of Ford himself.
 
Bought for the change gears, collets and tailstock.

Not sure what's up with the compound and the cross slide lead screw is bent. Other assorted missing parts too. The 3 step pulley on the motor side is shop made aluminum.View attachment 370287View attachment 370288View attachment 370289View attachment 370290View attachment 370291

Was surprised how heavy for the size too

Thanks,
Rich
You got a fantastic deal on that. I was watching that auction. The Hardinge HLVH at the same auction sold for $450. I didn't bid cause I didn't want to drive that far.
 
As the recipient of the 5C 608 that smt passed on last month, I'm elbow deep in removing 50 years of grime and grit. Thankfully no kibble, ....................

Ah, you've seen the pics....... Most would agree that mine was a pretty good candidate for a parts machine, at least as-received.
 
Ah, you've seen the pics....... Most would agree that mine was a pretty good candidate for a parts machine, at least as-received.
I'm really hoping my 608 is in better shape than that. The bull and back gears are shot, but I"m hoping the wear is acceptable.
 








 
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