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Schaublin 135 Evaluation

TheCollective

Plastic
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Location
Ottawa, ON
Hi everyone,
I'm going to be looking at a 1970's era 135 for sale a couple hours away. There doesn't look to be many accessories (ie. no collet closer or star wheel tailstock). Is there anything specific I should be looking for, other than the usual checks you might do when considering a used lathe?

From what I gather, oil leaking from the variator is a common issue on this vintage of 135. Also, how critical is it to get the full set of change gears? It does look like a few are missing.

Thanks in advance.
 
I think normal lathe checks is quite broad. Check if it has rapid feed, otherwise if it has wet or dry variator, oil leaks especially around the variator. Open the front cover of the electrical board and check if it’s genuine and its condition.
Check if the brake works correctly (integrated inside the motor).
Star wheeled tailstock is super, but nice to have for most of us. Does it have steady/follower test,
Does is have recessed or normal top slide?

Send some pictures and take a video.
Looking forward for another 135 project to start. We are stronger together 💪
 
Thanks @avivz I'll report back, but it looks like the normal top slide, no steady/follow rest. I know the electronics work, though that's largely irrelevant to me as 600 V/3 ph is impractical in my home shop.
 
The 135 seems to be a well built lathe, as suggested and was an issue with my machine is the variator and oil leaks, it's fixable but takes time and patience.
Accessories are nice as they are hard to find in the market and expensive, I've not used my steady since I have had the machine, follow I don't have and would be nice but not essential as you can make one.
Spindle bearings, any knocking on the drive train, check for 'notchy' carriage gearbox, engage the carriage feed as this handle is complex and has many functions.
Motor brake is good to have working but again mine needed attention, mounted to the back of the heavy motor so a challenging job to remove but again doable and service and parts should be available or can be shop made (bushes are prone to disintegrating as they are plastic)
Normal top slide is fine, Multifix holders fit better on the lowered version but not a game changer.

Plenty of threads to help once you have it in your shop so good luck and don't pay silly money, nice machines but parts are as rare as rocking horse sh&t and costly so factor this into your offer.
 
Thanks @marcsO, I appreciate it. The machine was not under power when I saw it, but everything looked pretty good. There's obviously an oil leak with the variator, but I'm sure I can figure that out. The motor is two speed 600 V, which I'll have to see about rewinding. I expect that the cost of doing so is significant. That would let me keep the brake, but I wonder whether a well set up VFD and braking resistor will be user friendly enough. I am probably going to be paying "silly" money, it's in the area of EUR 7k. For reference a 150 recently sold for EUR 10k in less nice condition. Machine tools are expensive here.

I've never run a 135 before so one question I had is that the carriage handwheel was fairly stiff to turn. Is that a function of not having the lube pump running?
 
There is a carriage lock lever just to the right of the carriage hand wheel, it only needs to be moved slightly to start 'binding' the motion of the carriage so ensure its pointing at 6o/c before testing the wheel motion (its a small 2.5" long lever at 3o/c right of main carriage wheel)

If the wheel is still stiff its probably gummed up beds, gummed up 'elasticones' which protect the lead screw - you can move them by looking up under the way bed and slide them back and forward to check for condition of the leadscrew (important also)
Its unlikely to be serious unless its a very 'notchy' feeling in which case there may be worn or damaged gears.

I'm sure someone with good electrical knowledge can modify the motor and add VFD, sadly not my domain so restricts my final task of getting the high speed to reliably work with my RPC and challenges around voltage fluctuations.

JH0yoYhETq2fxpWs1H0MWg.jpg
 
What voltage supply do you have?
7-10k EUR is quite high, but I’m aware that the prices of these machines in Europe are quite high. By comparison, Schaublin 150 in a good working condition with a collet set is up for sale now in Israel. The seller asks for 5k EUR (after he could not get the 7.5k that he asked for during the last 3 years). The highest buyer agrees to 4.5 at the moment…
 
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@marcsO
I suspect you're right about the table lock, the photos I took clearly show it partially engaged. I'm sure some internal cleaning is necessary too.

I'm not that worried about the electrical side of this machine, I've done a number of conversions/re-wires before. I'll post about that separately when I get into it.

May I ask what size multifix toolpost you have?

@avivz
For reference, Canada is a bit unique. Industry uses 600 V 3 phase (60 Hz) motors and residential properties are limited to 240V single phase. Once upon a time, custom 600 V motors were supplied on everything, even imported machines. Today it is customary to have step down transformers on 480 V (USA industry) machines. Unfortunately, it isn't easy to power a 600 V machine in a home shop, so what I've done in the past is retrofit a 240 V/3 P motor with a VFD on a 240 V/ 1 P supply. Seems to work well enough. The main drawback, other than cost, is that you are effectively limited to 3 hp.

I'm with you on the cost, the issue is that people know they have a rare machine on their hands these days (especially in North America). Given the low supply, all it takes is a few people with large budgets to increase costs across the board.
 
@marcsO
I suspect you're right about the table lock, the photos I took clearly show it partially engaged. I'm sure some internal cleaning is necessary too.

I'm not that worried about the electrical side of this machine, I've done a number of conversions/re-wires before. I'll post about that separately when I get into it.

May I ask what size multifix toolpost you have?

@avivz
For reference, Canada is a bit unique. Industry uses 600 V 3 phase (60 Hz) motors and residential properties are limited to 240V single phase. Once upon a time, custom 600 V motors were supplied on everything, even imported machines. Today it is customary to have step down transformers on 480 V (USA industry) machines. Unfortunately, it isn't easy to power a 600 V machine in a home shop, so what I've done in the past is retrofit a 240 V/3 P motor with a VFD on a 240 V/ 1 P supply. Seems to work well enough. The main drawback, other than cost, is that you are effectively limited to 3 hp.

I'm with you on the cost, the issue is that people know they have a rare machine on their hands these days (especially in North America). Given the low supply, all it takes is a few people with large budgets to increase costs across the board.
AXA (Multifix copy albeit a decent one) size E.
 
Thanks @marcsO, I'm a bit wary of seeing how much a full set will cost, but all in good time.

It looks like I have a deal to buy the lathe, I should have it home sometime next week. I'll start a new thread then, once I've had a chance to get it situated. Originally the lathe was going to be sold bare, but it sounds like a few accessories are going to come out of the woodwork if they get the price they want.
 
Pewe tools do a range of 'Multifix' holders and tooling, from all reports they are good products and cheaper than AXA, personally and stupidly I preferred the 'look' of the AXA product and convinced myself it was more in keeping with the 135, Pewe's chosen colours are not to my taste but they will do the job for sure and save you money and do have a larger range of holder formats and styles to choose from.

Look forward to the update when the 135 lands with you.
 
Thanks @marcsO, I'm a bit wary of seeing how much a full set will cost, but all in good time.

It looks like I have a deal to buy the lathe, I should have it home sometime next week. I'll start a new thread then, once I've had a chance to get it situated. Originally the lathe was going to be sold bare, but it sounds like a few accessories are going to come out of the woodwork if they get the price they want.
If you cab afford it, buy any original accessories/replacement parts they might have. Original accessories are extremely rare. Regarding other accessories, if they are of a good quality and condition, depends if you can get them in a good price as part of the deal.
 








 
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