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Setup to drill and tap 5/8 hole

I wish someone made a mini lathe that wasn’t crap, that looks like a lathe part to me assuming you’re talking about the central hole. If you tap it crooked it’s going to wobble and they’ll think it was made by a drunk.
 
I need a setup to drill and tap 5/8-11 holes in cast iron. Don't have room on the floor need something that I can use on a bench. How to find a drill press that will work for me? Or any other setup? I was thinking drill press to drill the hole and hand tapping machine to tap it. Will not be used for anything else. Just this specific operation.

Tap Cast iron dry; No lubricant. Drill the tap-drill hole. Clamp the work in a vise. Use a square along the side of the tap to get the tap true in the hole. Tap the hole. To figure the hole size for the tap 70 percent thread. Outside diameter -(.013 x 70 / number of threads) = Tap drill.

Roger
 
Ricks post # 23 (tools needed) along with a 1/2 hp drill press with stepping up the drill size or a 1 hp (or larger) DP for one shot at the hole.

Re: The OPS Part is a cast iron machine handwheel that needs a 5/16 hole made to be a 5/8 tapped hole, perhaps one a week.
 
I think we are being spammed...there's no way someone is this clueless...it's simply not possible.

I know how to do it just would like someone's opinion on what works best. I can't put a lathe in my garage since I don't have a room. Lathe will be the best option for this. I just don't have experience with hand tools. When I tried to tap by hand on lathe it wasn't easy. Had to use a extension pipe. It looks like 1hp drill press should work so I will look around for one.
 
You can set the part on the drill press table flat side down. Bring a chuck held point down to center/locate the existing hole. Crank tight/down two pre-set hold-downs, and then drill and tap with the part not moving.
 
You can set the part on the drill press table flat side down. Bring a chuck held point down to center/locate the existing hole. Crank tight/down two pre-set hold-downs, and then drill and tap with the part not moving.

That's what I want to do. I just want to make sure whatever I buy it will be able to do the job. I'm going to make a special holder for the wheel so it won't spin while I'm drilling/taping. I will look into 1hp drill presses and see where can I get one.
 
Given that the handwheel is to be threaded, how do you keep the handwheel from rotating on the shaft when turned? Or, are you using the handwheel as a big 5/8-11 nut on a long shaft?
 
Given that the handwheel is to be threaded, how do you keep the handwheel from rotating on the shaft when turned? Or, are you using the handwheel as a big 5/8-11 nut on a long shaft?

There are two jam nuts tighten against both ends of the wheel and a set screw to keep it in place.
 
There are two jam nuts tighten against both ends of the wheel and a set screw to keep it in place.

You put a set screw through it onto the threaded shaft?

vomit-vomiting.gif
 
You put a set screw through it onto the threaded shaft?
Well accepted practice.
Commonly done on the very highest dollar German and Swiss machine tools. In fact it is seen as sign of better in my book.
A brass or copper plug is used under the screw tip.
In many precision applications it is the best way to do it as it does not introduce axial variation due to threading vs face not perfect on both parts.
But of course most blue and scrape in the nut surface and contact at the tight point and load where they work.
Oh, wait maybe only spindle build guys do that.
Bob
 
You need a drill press. Not a fancy one, just a drill press. Line up the hand wheel and clamp it to the table. It might take a little time to setup but I’d guess it would be a 30 minute job.
 
It escapes me why this part needs to be threaded at all. It is hard to conceive of an application where a clearance hole drilled in the center and a roll pin cross drilled to fix the crank to the threaded shaft would not be good enough. It might also be more appropriate for the OP's skill level and equipment situation. If there is any slop in the clearance hole, then let's get the much vaunted JB Weld into this thread. (We should not pass up a chance to suggest JB Weld.) And I guess we, for completeness, should include McMaster-Carr which could undoubtedly supply the needed roll-pin as well as any drill bits, drill motors, and space-occupying epoxies should JB not be good enough.

Denis
 








 
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