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Shop Pet Peeves

I have a little shelf by the welding robot next to the hook for the teach pendant. It is supposed to have my programming tools (tech tip, level, wire cutters, sharpie, ruler, etc). People always scramble the tools into random welding booths and the shelf gets filled with random clamps.

People also like to put things in the way of light curtains.
 
Up there with rounded off wrenches I'd also put people who are incapable of telling the difference between metric and standard fasteners. Doesn't matter where the machine was made, if a wrench sorta fits, that's what they run with. Corners rounding off are then the fault of poorly made tools and fasteners, nevermind the dummy that didn't bother to grab the right tools.
 
In a working shop I have always used air to clean the machines, but *carefully* - never blowing toward way wipers or other areas where fines could get trapped and cause damage

I used to do the same until I got chips in a ball nut. Ever since then it's shop vac only, at least on open machines like knee mills, manual lathes and the like.
 
For drawers that I don't have cutouts in, but do have heavy objects that move in, I just put a small pad on the back. I don't slam them, but some stuff just likes to slide and I'm not going to try to stop a 150 pound drawer right as it shuts.
 
When a operator less than a year into the industry tries to tell me my feeds and speeds are wrong because Titans of CNC ran it faster. Look I'm not shitting on Titan and the guys there at all. I like the video's they make and watch several of them. I'm also a member there and help a lot of the younger folks with their questions and such. BUT...I had a young man that worked for me that completely missed the part in one of their videos where Titan said " Know your machine and your setup' Kid thought my feeds and speeds where wrong because I was running it slower. No we had at that time 2 Haas vf3 mills that was about 7 years old. The owner of that company got the cheapest tooling and tool holders he could. We was also having to lock the vise down on saw cut edges because the material was cut out of sheets of 6061 so all 4 side had saw cuts. He just could not comprehend the difference in set-ups. He didn't last long. When he tried to put a MT3 drill into a cat40 tool holder I realized it was time to move on and find someone else.
 
I don't disagree on the pet peeve, but it also sounds like you have a known problem.
A shallow angle metal doorstop on the inside to prevent the door from opening would stop them cold, as would moving the chain to the inside of the door so it blocks it from opening. Of course that doesn't work if you want other people to be able to come in from the outside.
I'm not sure how OSHA would feel about it, but I wonder what a "DANGER: HIGH VOLTAGE" sign on the chain would do. I've seen those paired with some well placed empty conduit work wonders at getting fork truck drivers to stop clipping corners off of walls.

While it really shouldn't be your problem, it sounds like a great opportunity for a split door with the lower half locked.
It's the main workshop roller door rather than a personnel door (which is located around 10' to the side and leads into the office rather than the workshop).

The chain is relatively new. I bought it around a month ago thinking "surely this will stop people wondering in". I wonder what they'd say about electric fencing? They can climb it but their nuts are going to get a zap!

I've got to re-paint the front personnel door shortly so putting a sign on it might help.
 
I've got to re-paint the front personnel door shortly so putting a sign on it might help.
Come on, you really think this will help? I'm pretty sure a lot of these guys can't read!

I'm by myself in the shop a lot so I keep the office door locked. Plenty of stuff in there a thief could carry off without me even knowing. There is a sign on the door with my cell #, no luck. I got a wireless doorbell with a loud enough ringer I can hear it in the shop. No luck. Put a sign by the doorbell, "Ring bell for entry ", no luck.

In reality each step got a few more takers, but I'm still amazed how many times I hear "I came by but you weren't there because the door was locked".

When the OH door is open I have an expanding gate and nobody has tried to cross that.
 
Come on, you really think this will help? I'm pretty sure a lot of these guys can't read!

I'm by myself in the shop a lot so I keep the office door locked. Plenty of stuff in there a thief could carry off without me even knowing. There is a sign on the door with my cell #, no luck. I got a wireless doorbell with a loud enough ringer I can hear it in the shop. No luck. Put a sign by the doorbell, "Ring bell for entry ", no luck.

In reality each step got a few more takers, but I'm still amazed how many times I hear "I came by but you weren't there because the door was locked".

When the OH door is open I have an expanding gate and nobody has tried to cross that.
Maybe the real answer lies in smacking them about the head and shoulders with whatever is in your hand at the time they come strolling it without notice. I mean yea it might cause bleeding and dizziness. You may have to wrap their head in saran wrap to stop the brea...bleeding , but it could be a solution for the next person that wants to strut in unannounced.
 
It's the main workshop roller door rather than a personnel door (which is located around 10' to the side and leads into the office rather than the workshop).

The chain is relatively new. I bought it around a month ago thinking "surely this will stop people wondering in". I wonder what they'd say about electric fencing? They can climb it but their nuts are going to get a zap!

I've got to re-paint the front personnel door shortly so putting a sign on it might help.
A simple electric eye and buzzer will alert you to someone coming through the door.
 
I had one of those flash incidents in my garage. Had a can of spray foam crack sealer sitting on the workbench. Bumped it with an elbow when I walked by and knocked it off. Damned if that thing didn't fall off and nail an extension cord with bullseye precision, with the *corner* of the can, just so such that it cut right through the cord insulation and shorted the cord. Talk about one in a million chance. Big flash and all the lights went out. I couldn't figure out what the hell had happened until I got the breaker reset and saw the arc mark on the corner of the can. That led me to the cord with the fresh, neatly cut slice and I was able to put 2 and 2 together. There was a plus, could have been a lot worse. At least the breaker cut out quick and it didn't arc a hole through the can and blow urethane foam all over the place...
I've had similar happen, just knocked off a $20 can of cold galvanizing spray, hits the leg castor bolt on the way down, pierces a hole in the can and proceeded to blow silver paint across everything within 10 ft while whizzing all over the floor. (It was a full can I literally just opened.) that was a mess.
Still been meaning to give that one man shop guy a talking too about that.
 
One of my career-long peeves is the numbskull who directs (or performs) simple jobs with "overkill" equipment. This phenomenon manifests itself in several ways, with the common ones being 1) using a master precision level to do a carpenter-level job, 2) using a jig transit or laser tracker to do a taut-line or plumb bob job, and 3) using a micrometer or equivalent to do a tape-measure job.

It's even more annoying when the overkill method becomes the "it's how we've always done it" technique and becomes embedded in the Technical Order or Procedure.
 
Inspectors writing up a NCR on a part for a fractional dimension being out of tolerance by 0.001". Tolerance is +/-1/32". Checking it with a pair of dial calipers. They don't know how to measure with a Starrett 4R ruler and say it is okay. Or use a tape measure to check a part that is 6 foot long with a +/-1/8" tolerance.
 
Inspectors writing up a NCR on a part for a fractional dimension being out of tolerance by 0.001". Tolerance is +/-1/32".
Suppose the nominal dimension was 4". If they rejected it for being 3.999", yes, that's dumb. If they rejected it for being 3.967", then they are doing their job. I have a pet peeve where people take a wide tolerance as license to make it any old dimension they want. Classic case: Ask for a piece of structural steel to be cut 48" -0+1", and they cut it 47.8".
 








 
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