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Show me your Planes

And I'm working on a miniature Rabbit Plane. Ralph


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Look at this unassuming Japanese plane; very fine shaving, makes one think of the Marunaka.


Spud,
you are way too impressionable.
The guy is using yellow cedar, with virtually no grain, and the trick is easy.

I did not have yellow cedar on hand but dug up (:) ) an old grade stake (2 x 4) to sacrifice to science.
The plane is an early Pre-WW1 Stanley #8 with the tippy frog (IOW, more than adequate, but not the top class of stanley for performance. Later versions had better frog support and then there are also the even better "Bedrock" s)

Be assured that the reversing grain over the knot and in other places is far more difficult to plane well than a stick of straight grain mild yellow cedar.

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The only "trick" here, if you want to call it that, is that the Japanese are forced to use what we would call "import" steel. To them, it is just what they have to work with. The Stanley plane above has made in USA steel. In this demonstration, it is sharpened with oil stones including the white/translucent stuff dug out of the ground in Arkansas.

All that thin shaving contest stuff on soft straight grain wood means nothing when you start in on figured hardwoods with constantly reversing grain slope. A real test is _against_ the grain in _figured_ hardwood; and leave a tear-out free shimmering surface.

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for reference, this is what the stick looked like from the machine planer, before it was planed with the hand plane a few strokes.

infillplane16.jpg


smt
 
Love the work!

(needs a fence & a depth stop :) )
The unfenced metal versions usually look like "regular" bench planes (Stanley/Bailey, e;.g.)with wooden totes but with side cut-outs for the blade. Also usually a nicker on the offside.

Examples of a Record rebate, and a Stanley skewed dado or rebate with fences and nickers.

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About a dozen years ago I installed a period type "library" or sitting room in a nice 1920's era house. It included perhaps 30 or so inset doors with mortise hinges. Most of the doors were in the low, bench like seating options around the room. So the hinge gains were in rebates and very near the top and bottom of the doors for good geometry so the doors don't sag over time. With this type of installation, the location and depth of the hinge gains is rather critical. There being no option to fit an electric router for the work and me being prone to looking for options to make tools instead of doing the work, this is what I came up with.

smt_planestuff39.jpg


It is a (hand) router with some adaptations. One of the more useful for repetitive work is an adjustable depth stop. The round stop on the right with the allen screw is set for the final depth. The long brass blade with the knurled thumbscrew is set to take the depth of the first pass, and then adjusted down incrementally with succeeding cuts until it hits the final depth stop. Naturally, each gain is outlined with a chisel, and most of the waste popped out with a chisel. Then one goes back and routs all the gains to smooth, parallel, final depth.

Here's the adjustable brass depth stop at final depth, butting the round stop.

smt_planestuff40.jpg


To get good support right up to the top and bottom edge of a gain in a rebate in a prebuilt cabinet; the router includes a hardened steel track that is held, or in some cases can be clamped or braced with a go-stick. The blade holder swivels, and can rise or fall in the bore of the body, limited by the previously described stops. The body is ductile iron for good bearing with the steel blade holder, and the steel track.

smt_planestuff41.jpg


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I was going to put a penlight bulb and aaa battery in the oval bore behind the round bore the blade holder fits into. LED's did not exist at the time, but if some similar job comes up in future, an LED would be even better! :)

All the parts including (shop made) collet to adjust gross depth position on the blade.

smt_planestuff43.jpg


smt
 
So I thought this was just too cool not to share.

The Background - We're installing a new machine cell at work, with two new CNC lathes and a robot. The robot drops the parts on an outfeed chute, and the parts exit the cell to be inspected...

Today, the dealer brings some Delrin plastic rails for the outfeed chute to be installed. Too thick - 10mm instead of .375" like they were supposed to be. Instead of re-ordering material and remaking the parts, I offered to take them home and plane them down.

So tonight, I break out the old' Dunlap #4 with doweled-frog (posted earlier) to give it a shot. With a sharp iron, and some fiddling with cutting depths, I finally got it to cut.

Turns out, Delrin is pretty tough (already knew that,) and requires lots of downforce, and thrust to make it through the cuts (learned that tonight.) I could have gone with my LN #7 for extra weight, but it has a 50* frog, and I figured a 45* frog would be better suited.

It's also a good thing I use a gently-curved iron in my planes. Even with lighter cutting depths, taking a full-width cut was enough to start pushing my rather stout mini-roubo workbench a little. With the curved iron, I was able to take half-passes on the edges, then take a full width pass down the center to smooth out the surface.

It came out well. Using a micrometer to check hand-plane work was kind of neat. :) I think I might have to fix up another hand-plane to keep At work, you know, just in case...
 
So I thought this was just too cool not to share.

The Background - We're installing a new machine cell at work, with two new CNC lathes and a robot. The robot drops the parts on an outfeed chute, and the parts exit the cell to be inspected...

Today, the dealer brings some Delrin plastic rails for the outfeed chute to be installed. Too thick - 10mm instead of .375" like they were supposed to be. Instead of re-ordering material and remaking the parts, I offered to take them home and plane them down.

So tonight, I break out the old' Dunlap #4 with doweled-frog (posted earlier) to give it a shot. With a sharp iron, and some fiddling with cutting depths, I finally got it to cut.

Turns out, Delrin is pretty tough (already knew that,) and requires lots of downforce, and thrust to make it through the cuts (learned that tonight.) I could have gone with my LN #7 for extra weight, but it has a 50* frog, and I figured a 45* frog would be better suited.

It's also a good thing I use a gently-curved iron in my planes. Even with lighter cutting depths, taking a full-width cut was enough to start pushing my rather stout mini-roubo workbench a little. With the curved iron, I was able to take half-passes on the edges, then take a full width pass down the center to smooth out the surface.

It came out well. Using a micrometer to check hand-plane work was kind of neat. :) I think I might have to fix up another hand-plane to keep At work, you know, just in case...

I surprised that a plane worked. I've never tried to plane Delrin, but I've tried to on polypro and UHMW, and it never worked for me. I do have small Lie-Nielson scraper plane that will work on these plastics.
 
A Stanley plane will cut reversing or curly wood without splintering or tearing the wood IF YOU SET THE chip breaker to within a few thousandths of the cutting edge. The chip breaker must be carefully fitted so that thin chips can't get under it. It must be so close to the edge that the chip breaker is actually BELOW the depth of the cut. Then,the chip breaker will bend back the chip so hard that it is prevented from splitting down into the wood.

The proper use of the chip breaker has been forgotten over the years,but it will work amazingly well if properly set. This is a fact. Do not dismiss it without trying it. Be sure the chip breaker fits dead tight against the blade all the way across. Filing the leading edge of the chip breaker to a more blunt angle helps too. The chips need to come out of the plane looking CORRUGATED. The plane will be harder to push,too,but you can plane difficult grain perfectly once you get the plane set up properly.
 
I surprised that a plane worked. I've never tried to plane Delrin, but I've tried to on polypro and UHMW, and it never worked for me. I do have small Lie-Nielson scraper plane that will work on these plastics.

The iron was fresh off the stone sharp, and it did require LOTS of downward pressure to keep it in the cut. With shallow cuts, it was definitely possible. I would imagine UHMW should be a walk in the park. I was surprised that I could cut the Delrin though...
 
The iron was fresh off the stone sharp, and it did require LOTS of downward pressure to keep it in the cut. With shallow cuts, it was definitely possible. I would imagine UHMW should be a walk in the park. I was surprised that I could cut the Delrin though...

I have found that with polypro and very low angle and very sharp was necessary on my chisels. I might have to try it again with my low angle LN block plane.

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...nery/show-me-your-chisels-269406/#post2082108
 
This adjustable pitch plane was finished in 2018 and has been quite useful since.
It is a prototype, so not as refined as a loopy. But in some regards more interesting technically.
It has both an adjustable throat, and an adjustable angle frog. Which tilts from about 47 deg through 80+ deg (I might have posted actual values elsewhere in the past.)

Made of 17-4 stainless, frog is mild steel with a soldered spine (color residue)
Toepiece is hardened. Iron is cpm M4 welded to mild steel shank. Loopy adjuster. Scrap knob & square thread screw for lever cap from loopy parts box.

DSC_0044.JPGDSC_0040.JPGDSC_0028.JPGDSC_0031.JPGDSC_0027.JPG
 
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I wanted to see if there was any actual merit or practical application for a bevel down iron with adjustable pitch.
It is not much needed for most solid wood. Where is has really proven worth the effort to build is when planing solid banding next to veneered surfaces; and for repairing old work where solids and veneers are inserted to make up missing pieces. .DSC_0050.JPGDSC_0282.JPGDSC_0291.JPGDSC_0033 - Copy.JPGDSC_0021.JPG

OTOH I tuned a Veritas low angle smoothing plane for someone recently & it certainly works impressively with a 50 deg bevel iron! (Only angle owner included so no personal experience with other angles). Having started my plane-making journey inspired by low-angle adjustable throat block planes, now i want to build something like the Veritas, or more correctly, its Stanley precursor.

smt
 
About a dozen years ago I installed a period type "library" or sitting room in a nice 1920's era house. It included perhaps 30 or so inset doors with mortise hinges. Most of the doors were in the low, bench like seating options around the room. So the hinge gains were in rebates and very near the top and bottom of the doors for good geometry so the doors don't sag over time. With this type of installation, the location and depth of the hinge gains is rather critical. There being no option to fit an electric router for the work and me being prone to looking for options to make tools instead of doing the work, this is what I came up with.

smt_planestuff39.jpg


It is a (hand) router with some adaptations. One of the more useful for repetitive work is an adjustable depth stop. The round stop on the right with the allen screw is set for the final depth. The long brass blade with the knurled thumbscrew is set to take the depth of the first pass, and then adjusted down incrementally with succeeding cuts until it hits the final depth stop. Naturally, each gain is outlined with a chisel, and most of the waste popped out with a chisel. Then one goes back and routs all the gains to smooth, parallel, final depth.

Here's the adjustable brass depth stop at final depth, butting the round stop.

smt_planestuff40.jpg


To get good support right up to the top and bottom edge of a gain in a rebate in a prebuilt cabinet; the router includes a hardened steel track that is held, or in some cases can be clamped or braced with a go-stick. The blade holder swivels, and can rise or fall in the bore of the body, limited by the previously described stops. The body is ductile iron for good bearing with the steel blade holder, and the steel track.

smt_planestuff41.jpg


smt_planestuff42.jpg


I was going to put a penlight bulb and aaa battery in the oval bore behind the round bore the blade holder fits into. LED's did not exist at the time, but if some similar job comes up in future, an LED would be even better! :)

All the parts including (shop made) collet to adjust gross depth position on the blade.

smt_planestuff43.jpg


smt
Stephen, thank you so much for reviving this old thread, because it gave me an opportunity to take a better look at this previous post of yours. I think it is a masterpiece of ingenuity and craftsmanship.
 
This adjustable pitch plane was finished in 2018 and has been quite useful since.
It is a prototype, so not as refined as a loopy. But in some regards more interesting technically.
It has both an adjustable throat, and an adjustable angle frog. Which tilts from about 47 deg through 80+ deg (I might have posted actual values elsewhere in the past.)

Made of 17-4 stainless, frog is mild steel with a soldered spine (color residue)
Toepiece is hardened. Iron is cpm M4 welded to mild steel shank. Loopy adjuster. Scrap knob & square thread screw for lever cap from loopy parts box.

View attachment 391291View attachment 391292View attachment 391294View attachment 391295View attachment 391296
Stephen, love seeing this plane! Glad to see you back on the forum, missed you!
 
This adjustable pitch plane was finished in 2018 and has been quite useful since.
It is a prototype, so not as refined as a loopy. But in some regards more interesting technically.
It has both an adjustable throat, and an adjustable angle frog. Which tilts from about 47 deg through 80+ deg (I might have posted actual values elsewhere in the past.)

Made of 17-4 stainless, frog is mild steel with a soldered spine (color residue)
Toepiece is hardened. Iron is cpm M4 welded to mild steel shank. Loopy adjuster. Scrap knob & square thread screw for lever cap from loopy parts box.
Hi Stephen,

Wow, your adjustable angle plane is fascinating! Does the position of the cutting edge move as you change the blade angle? If yes, then is there an issue with the tip of the blade being unsupported from behind?

I see that there is an adjustable throat, but is there also an adjustable piece behind the blade? Is it for support?

How have you found it to work? Have you established at what point the chipbreaker stops being helpful? Hand scrapers and scraper planes work without throats or with very wide throats and no chipbreakers.

Have you tried different bevel angles as well? So many options to explore.

Thank you for sharing. Andrew
 
Headed out to my ski instructor gig, which is winding down for the winter. :)
Quick response to this Q:
Does the position of the cutting edge move as you change the blade angle?

No.
That was the issue with so many planes that attempted a tilting frog feature in the past.
For instance, Bridge City's version is so wonderfully complex you have to love it for the gizmosity, multiple corresponding scales and settings to work with linkages around the blade displacement, but it is not a convenient plane.
My version was a response to pondering historical initiatives as well as BCT's; including making the iron wide enough to be interesting for regular work.

Per design, mine uses a trunnion, so the focal point is the cutting edge of the blade when the design thickness blade is extended aprox .0015".
OTOH, it does move within a few .001's depending on blade thickness, and blade extension. Also, in the making, final grinding and scraping, i have never figured out a test to verify how close to design target i managed. (within .001's) If anyone has a convenient method, i'd love to try it.

smt
 
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I have always been fascinated by shoulder planes, though terribly expensive and not really useful for the kind of work I do; having said that I made my own, both in wood and in metal; the wooden ones were made out of beech and were affected by moisture so they do not work. Photos attached in black and white, coudn't find the way to go back to color in my camera.
 

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