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SO it looks like we are getting a thread roller

rjwalker1973

Stainless
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Location
Lakeland, Florida
Just like the title said, my boss is looking at thread rollers and hopes to have one within 2 months max. So my question to the forum is this. I have never used one before. This is a stand alone machine. I know the science behind one and I feel very confident I can figure it out. I just wanted to see if there is any little quirks to look out for or tips from folks with more experience than me with rolling threads.
 
Yep, there are dedicated, self-resetting, rolling heads that you can use on a CNC. Titans video here:


It's a rabbit hole of a subject. I still have not gotten to the bottom of it but, will probably be looking for one of these guys at IMTS. I had some fasteners that really shoulda' been rolled but, cutting worked okay.
 
Just like the title said, my boss is looking at thread rollers and hopes to have one within 2 months max. So my question to the forum is this. I have never used one before. This is a stand alone machine. I know the science behind one and I feel very confident I can figure it out. I just wanted to see if there is any little quirks to look out for or tips from folks with more experience than me with rolling threads.
Lots of machinist don’t know you can knurl with them. I had thousands of 316 SS knurled and never a bad knurl.
Also I had a 1000 piece job scraped by a new hire . The part had a .06 chamfer on one side and a .015 chamfer on the other end and he cut the .06 on both sides. I had about .015 material to turn off on the od and I Had the thread roller displace that stock
to the small side and saved all the parts.That was also 316 SS.
 
Years ago I ran a stand alone reed roll threader.

Pretty sure this isn't what you meant but a stroll down memory lane.

Three five start dies... one had to take light impressions and rotate the dies for proper thread line- up.
Hodge
 

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Just like the title said, my boss is looking at thread rollers and hopes to have one within 2 months max. So my question to the forum is this. I have never used one before. This is a stand alone machine. I know the science behind one and I feel very confident I can figure it out. I just wanted to see if there is any little quirks to look out for or tips from folks with more experience than me with rolling threads.
Flat die for short stuff or round die for long stuff?
 
Yep, there are dedicated, self-resetting, rolling heads that you can use on a CNC. Titans video here:


It's a rabbit hole of a subject. I still have not gotten to the bottom of it but, will probably be looking for one of these guys at IMTS. I had some fasteners that really shoulda' been rolled but, cutting worked okay.
You better be sitting down when you get the price.
 
You better be sitting down when you get the price.
I've looked into it. :D

What I still don't understand are things like some of them have helical rollers and parallel shanks. So they have a very deliberate thread pitch and that makes some sense. These seem to me that they would need timing gears to keep all the leads in synchronization. It can't be just ram the cutting head onto the material and cross your fingers. Or is it?

Then there are parallel ribbed rollers but, the axes are oriented at the thread angle. These too will cut a helix. But then I go to the websites, hunt eBay and other places. I find rollers that look like parallel ribs that go into holders that have no provision for changing the axis of the rollers. Does one need a cutting head for each angle? Nothing makes sense.

I can't find enough background to formulate good questions, which is why I'm participating in this discussion. I've been on the lookout for a matched 3/8-16 head and roller set on eBay. Nothing so far.
 
I've looked into it. :D

What I still don't understand are things like some of them have helical rollers and parallel shanks. So they have a very deliberate thread pitch and that makes some sense. These seem to me that they would need timing gears to keep all the leads in synchronization. It can't be just ram the cutting head onto the material and cross your fingers. Or is it?

Then there are parallel ribbed rollers but, the axes are oriented at the thread angle. These too will cut a helix. But then I go to the websites, hunt eBay and other places. I find rollers that look like parallel ribs that go into holders that have no provision for changing the axis of the rollers. Does one need a cutting head for each angle? Nothing makes sense.

I can't find enough background to formulate good questions, which is why I'm participating in this discussion. I've been on the lookout for a matched 3/8-16 head and roller set on eBay. Nothing so far.
I'll send you a PM with some info so we don't hijack the thread.
 
I'll send you a PM with some info so we don't hijack the thread.
That works. I was discussing it here because it's not clear how much of it is different from where @rjwalker1973 is headed. Or is this an old school roller machine with vibratory feeders and racks of blank shanks?
 
That works. I was discussing it here because it's not clear how much of it is different from where @rjwalker1973 is headed. Or is this an old school roller machine with vibratory feeders and racks of blank shanks?
I want know for sure until the boss finds one, but from what he told me it will in feed and feed through. It is the standalone machine. We have some small stuff we occasionally make and this was the cheaper option than getting a Swiss that would sit idle 75 percent of the time. We can also do our double adjusters and other od threaded stuff.
 
Years ago I ran a stand alone reed roll threader.

Pretty sure this isn't what you meant but a stroll down memory lane.

Three five start dies... one had to take light impressions and rotate the dies for proper thread line- up.
Hodge
Not sure because he has not found one yet, but I think it will be similar in how it works.
 
Not sure because he has not found one yet, but I think it will be similar in how it works.
If i can answer any questions about them I'll be glad to.
We ran them in production, spark plug facility.
With all the track and cylinders in place they were spitting out 60 per min.

I could generally change out saddles, hinge assemblies with new threading dies, dialed in and running in thirty or forty minutes.
Hodge
 
We have some small stuff we occasionally make and this was the cheaper option than getting a Swiss that would sit idle 75 percent of the time.
This is why I started down the rabbit hole. It doesn't look like that special of a process. I don't see any reason at all that any old CNC lathe couldn't do this process. I was hunting to buy to do rolled threads on my TL-1. I won't have runs of thousands of parts but, if I can buy one head that covers a range and only needs new rollers, I think that would work for my needs. If I had something that would cover 8-14mm (or 5/16-1/2"), it would cover the range of anything my own product line would ever need.

This is what I've had my eye on. Maybe it's something that would integrate into what you guys are doing as well?

 
If i can answer any questions about them I'll be glad to.
We ran them in production, spark plug facility.
With all the track and cylinders in place they were spitting out 60 per min.

I could generally change out saddles, hinge assemblies with new threading dies, dialed in and running in thirty or forty minutes.
Hodge
Once we have one here I may just pick your brain a bit. Thanks.
 
This is why I started down the rabbit hole. It doesn't look like that special of a process. I don't see any reason at all that any old CNC lathe couldn't do this process. I was hunting to buy to do rolled threads on my TL-1. I won't have runs of thousands of parts but, if I can buy one head that covers a range and only needs new rollers, I think that would work for my needs. If I had something that would cover 8-14mm (or 5/16-1/2"), it would cover the range of anything my own product line would ever need.

This is what I've had my eye on. Maybe it's something that would integrate into what you guys are doing as well?

I'll have to look at the versatility. We run anywhere from 3/8 threads to 1 3/4. If he only wanted to do the small stuff ( He is now saying well hell lets do all our OD threading on it.) I would definitely be looking at something like that.
 
I had some of those threadrollerheads a couple of years ago
I was not able to sell them for decent money
I finaly sold it to a polisch compagnie specialized in these things
I do still have a box of rollers for them I think
 

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