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South Bend 13 Restoration

Thanks for your time.

You're welcome - this IS a labor of love. But let me mention something on restorations in general...

I've now done a bunch of restorations: Heavy-10, 9a, South Bend drill press, Atlas drill press, Bridgeport mill and this current 13". These machines look SO beautiful when they're finished, but it's a bit of an illusion. Kind of like that gorgeous model who looks perfect for the photo shoot. But she looks a lot different in the morning with no make up, or after a day of chopping fire wood - LOL.

Point is, the MOMENT you start cutting metal, all that perfection is gone. Oil and chips get everywhere within minutes. I gasped at this (inevitable reality) on my first lathe :eek:

Then it faded... It happened again with my 9", but with less intensity. So now, I'll give myself a day or so to "mourn" the loss of shininess and flawless paint :bawling:

Then its full-on chip making. After all, these are machines that get dirty cutting metal with oil :rolleyes5:
 
You're welcome - this IS a labor of love. But let me mention something on restorations in general...

I've now done a bunch of restorations: Heavy-10, 9a, South Bend drill press, Atlas drill press, Bridgeport mill and this current 13". These machines look SO beautiful when they're finished, but it's a bit of an illusion. Kind of like that gorgeous model who looks perfect for the photo shoot. But she looks a lot different in the morning with no make up, or after a day of chopping fire wood - LOL.

Point is, the MOMENT you start cutting metal, all that perfection is gone. Oil and chips get everywhere within minutes. I gasped at this (inevitable reality) on my first lathe :eek:

Then it faded... It happened again with my 9", but with less intensity. So now, I'll give myself a day or so to "mourn" the loss of shininess and flawless paint :bawling:

Then its full-on chip making. After all, these are machines that get dirty cutting metal with oil :rolleyes5:


.........Brad your doing better than I do, I still shed a tear or 2 after its first use. .........but then I start looking at the next project and it goes away. Best.......................Rick
 
Point is, the MOMENT you start cutting metal, all that perfection is gone. Oil and chips get everywhere within minutes.

My plan for the heavy 9 is to do a full restoration and absolutely no repainting, except for the numbers on the dials. Too much work and it's going to get all dirty and chipped anyway.

Steve
 
A little progress report

Been busy painting, painting and more painting. Then it was time for buffing on the scotch-brite wheel. I use an ultra-fine wheel that simply cleans and brightens. I've done EVERY LAST nut, bolt, washer and part (except castings and any "ways", of course). All way surfaces I use 0000 steel wool and WD-40 as a cleaner.

I have a few more things to do before re-assembly. All my castings that I hand-painted need a second coat, the underdrive needs to be cleaned & painted. And finally, I need to high-polish the apron & tailstock hand wheels.


Ok, so I couldn't resist throwing a couple castings on the bed to get a little pre-glimpse of the machine. And boy, I'm liking it :drool5:

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I think you are going to make chips by Christmas.....looks really, really good Brad!
 
Please don't take the fact that I'm not going to repaint mine to mean that I don't understand and appreciate the work you are doing.

It's looking great, and I love the progress reports. Keep 'em coming.

Steve
 
suhweeet! As usual your work is outstanding! I like the leveling feet you have installed, bet they would cut down on noise a little too.
 
suhweeet! As usual your work is outstanding! I like the leveling feet you have installed, bet they would cut down on noise a little too.

Those pads, combined with the machine's bigger size, makes it VERY comfortable. When I stand in front of it, it's as if the machine is in my lap. Can't wait to use it.
 
Those pads, combined with the machine's bigger size, makes it VERY comfortable. When I stand in front of it, it's as if the machine is in my lap. Can't wait to use it.
Where'd you get those pads? I think I might like to put those on my 10. I also noticed you polished the door star knob, that looks cool, I might have to steal that idea too! LOL
 
I am wondering, do you know the size of the thread and TPI of the large dial compound on this 13" and is the dial a 200 graduation or a 150?
Ron
 
When I bought my lathe, it came with a taper attachment that wasn't mounted. It also hadn't been fitted. What this means is that there were never any pins installed. These pins keep the attachment in its permanent position, while the bolts keep it tight against the saddle. I had downloaded a PDF (which I can send to anyone who needs it) of the instructions for mounting and fitting.

I began assembling the machine and didn't realize that I put it in place before I addressed the taper. So I began by picking up on the lathe with the crane, just enough to allow me to pickup on each side and walk it out from the edge of the wall.

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Getting all the pieces together and laid out
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First order of operations is to test the connecting bar for straightness (to see if it sags when extended).
I began by using a carborundum stone to clean the bearing surfaces or any high spots.
I don't know how to scrape, so this is all about I can do, aside from hoping for the best.
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Indicator set to zero on one end. The tolerance is .0005 over the the length of extension.
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Fully extended and is perfectly with in spec - .0005
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Some more shots of the indicator setup.
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Next was to test the taper-bed for parallelism with the lathe bed. You Bolt the bracket to the saddle
And then set up the indicator to check both sides. I used a surface gauge to hold my indicator because you need to switch back and forth And check each side of it.
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Taking a reading on one side, shows less than .0005
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The other side shows similar results.
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Now that the taper is parallel with the lathe bed, it's time to drill into the saddle and press in some retaining pins. For a 13", the instructions call for a 19/64 drill and 5/16 ream.
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One side done, the other pin is next to be pressed in.
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Pins in (yes, one needs to be ground down to proper length) and ready for fully assembly.
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All assembled, oiled and working nice and smooth.
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Here, I'm using some Allen-bolts with rubber bushings as "stops" for the taper's bed.
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All done and now time to move onto the apron.
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Hell...I just took my taper attachment off when disassembling my Sheldon 10"...looks I have some work to do when it comes time to put it back.

I've heard it said that Sheldons are generally built heavier than SB's....such that a Sheldon 10" is closer to a SB 13"...but I'm not sure that's true. It looks to me like you have just the right amount of mass in those castings, and they appear very well built. A very big difference between the 9's/10's and what you have there. That's one very important thing to know about South Bend...the quality just isn't there until you at least get into a Heavy 10 and even then some of the castings can be a bit light.

Of course, that's the trade off for having a machine that will fit in your garage and can be moved easily. My Sheldon EL 56 weighs 900 lbs and that's about as heavy as I can get machine-wise until I'm gonna live in one place for a while.
 








 
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