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South Bend 9 - A Rich Inheritance

re- the taper attachment...you can't make a cut and then crank it back to the beginning without it cutting on the way back...that's gonna happen if you don't withdraw the tool first before cranking back to the beginning.

I don't thaink it is a problem with the attachment. Try withdrawing the tool and then crank it back, readvance tool for next cut.

Thanks for that! Now I need to put it back on and only feed right with it. I will let you know how it goes.

how about a closer pic of the tailstock?

Sure thing. Here you go.

Things I know John did to it:

  • Added a scale on top with a rod you can attach an indicator to
  • Added a chuck key holder on the backside
  • Changed the lock lever to a flip handle, so it was never pointing in an inconvenient direction
  • Made a custom wrench for the tailstock lock nut so it when the tailstock is loose, the wrench is recessed into the tailstock itself.

y8en27mr


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By the way, the photos were taken while I was figuring out how to cut threads...

...using a custom thread cutting tool post made by John
...using the advice you all have given me on this forum!

So glad I found this place!

yadmavb6
 
i love that he made his threading block with a proper eccentric for adjustment.

Check out his cross feed nut too, bet you lift off the cover with a magnet so you can oil it directly.
 
You can actually run the carriage back to the left while using the taper and without dragging the tool. Just back the compound out, run the carriage back, then return the compound to it's original position.
 
That threading (and your thread pitch) looks suspiciously like a barrel tenon?
If so, consider replacing the rule atop the tailstock with a dial indicator on a mag base (the tailstock quill is already graduated for rough measuring), using the plate already on the quill for precise travel measurement).

Come to think of it, I would have expected boxes of indicators, mikes, calipers, magnetic bases etc. Assuming they auctioned all this stuff from his shop separately?
 
That threading (and your thread pitch) looks suspiciously like a barrel tenon?
If so, consider replacing the rule atop the tailstock with a dial indicator on a mag base (the tailstock quill is already graduated for rough measuring), using the plate already on the quill for precise travel measurement).

Come to think of it, I would have expected boxes of indicators, mikes, calipers, magnetic bases etc. Assuming they auctioned all this stuff from his shop separately?

You are correct. I am an antique Winchester collector, shooter, custom rifle-builder and tinkerer. That part you see in the lathe is a scrap barrel from a 1961 model 70, which I was using for practice purposes.

Regardign the things you would have thought John had with his lathe... now you have touched on a sore topic. There were many things which I wish I had been in a position to buy from John's shop. Unfortunately, the auction company which liquidated John's shop broke up much of it up into lots for sale purposes, and did so without understanding or appreciation of what pieces should be logically grouped.

In fact, the topic of the auction company's dealings with an elderly couple's cherished possession's and accumulated net-assets is something so terrible, it makes me furious just thinking about it.

Suffice to say, I did not get all of the pieces for this lathe (or which logically could have been packaged with the lathe), including a large selection of Starrett measuring tools. In the end, we were not even given a chance to purchase them.

The story from the auctioneer is that he sold them to a personal friend in advance of the public auction. When we demanded a line-item accounting of what was sold outside of the public eye and for how much, the auctioneer refused. John and his wife were too elderly, too tired and too emotionally distraught by it all to fight the battle. Because my dad and I were not a party to the contract, the auctioneer was able to tell us to take a hike when we tried to force him to give an accounting of his private sales out of John's collection. We were not so much worried about what we were not given a chance to buy, but were concerned about the opportunity for things to disappear from John's shop with no accounting of it, and for John and his wife to receive nothing from it.

All of this makes me very grateful John was able to separately sell the few items which we purchased from him, including his SB lathe. They are likely the only pieces of his life-work for which he was not ripped off in a complete scam.
 
Thanks for sharing this! Not only have I enjoyed reading this thread, but what I’m sure will from now and forever on in my head be referred to as “John’s Lathe” will be a great inspiration as I start restoring my own 9A this month. It’s my first lathe, and I plan to have it as long as John had his. It’s already making me rethink the boring grey paint I bought for mine :-)


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questions..Yes i was going to ask how you got the lathe. It is not unusual for a auction company to make a real mess out of selling shop tools..
I bought nice lathe chuck at a auction one time and a other bidder bought the back plate, it just does not make any scents.
 
" It is not unusual for a auction company to make a real mess out of selling shop tools.."

The implication here is more sinister than just a complete mess. The subtext is that the auction company cherry picked
the more desireable items, and "sold" them to their "friends." Probably for a dollar amount well under their true value.

The result of a such a hypothetical sham sale would be a fraudulent amount reported, and delivered to the owners of items like
this.

If this is the case, the silver lining in the story is the 9" model A was diverted from the supposed scam. The auction house owner
would no doubt be gnashing his teeth over this thread. Good.
 
"The result of a such a hypothetical sham sale would be a fraudulent amount reported, and delivered to the owners of items like this."

Jim, you have hit the nail on the head.

I have no ideal what a reasonable contract is with an auctioneer, but I believe John was only to receive $0.65 for every $1.00 that came in through the auction house. The auctioneer was going to make 35% of the sale price, every time the gavel fell. Maybe that's typical. To me, it seems like 35% is more than enough going to the auctioneer. Certainly enough that he doesn't need to be working a separate side-scam to steal the best items out of the lot for himself and his friends.

Here is one clue to how cheaply things were sold outside of the auction - a large roll-away tool box which contained mostly Snap-on tools, plus all of the Starrett instruments was sold to "the friend" for $1,200. That's the only information we were able to get out of the auctioneer. Of course, the real value of that roll-away and its contents was probably 10x that amount.

I am sorry for dragging this very unhappy topic into this thread, but hopefully it will help someone else avoid a similar circumstance. John's two adult children (approaching retirement age themselves) had no interest in the machine shop or its contents, so were very hands off. John's health prevented him from being directly involved. We were not in a position to step in and make sure it was handled fairly and honestly. In the end, it opened the door for the auctioneer to easily pull off his scam with little or no chance of being questioned, let alone caught and held accountable. We encouraged the family (John's adult children) to contact the police or an attorney, but they just weren't involved or interested enough to do so.

The bottom line is this - it is likely all of us would use our shop until we are too old and feeble to actively manage how it is either liquidated or distributed to a future generation. If we want it done right, the planning of how it will be done and who will oversee it is an important part of our estate planning.

Apologies again for taking us down that rat-hole. It's much better for my mood to talk about the lathe! :)
 
yeah, screw 'em.

Back to the machine....I think members would like to see in detail all those wonderful little tool blocks...I know I would. Cool stuff!
 
Great story. My Dad bought his Southbend from an old guy, who was also thrilled to pass it on to a trademen, and made sure Dad also got his lifes collection of accessories.

Those two acme thread taps John made, could they be the taps for making replacement lead screw nuts for the cross slide and compound?
Mark
 
Those two acme thread taps John made, could they be the taps for making replacement lead screw nuts for the cross slide and compound?
Mark

Thanks Mark. I will ask John. At least one of the taps is just about the right size for this, so perhaps so! It would be handy if this was the case, as I know John would have made the tap just right to match the screw perfectly and remove any backlash out of the compound. I will let you know what he says.
 
I'm not in the same boat as John - yet. My son has no interest in machine tools, but I have a friend who is a toolmaker for a defense manufacturer. He's planning his own home now, with a large machine shop. I've talked to him about liquidating my own shop tools when I don't need them anymore. The current discussion would give him a 25% commission on whatever he sells, and he can buy my lathe, mill, and their associated tooling for a fixed price (about half the going market value). I know he's careful with tools, and treats them well.

Like many of us old timers, I don't care so much about the value of my tools - I care that they wind up with someone who will use them and pass them on to another generation or two.
 
Back to the machine....I think members would like to see in detail all those wonderful little tool blocks...I know I would. Cool stuff!

Indeed!

All of the tooling which John made himself, he marked with his name.

y9be8gxd


Using these marks as a guide, I am including photos of all the tool blocks I know John fabricated himself.

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(pretty sure this boring bar is fabricated from a tap - a good piece of tool steel, and John never let anything go to waste)

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Good luck with it (I'm an 07 FFL).
Looks like you cut the threads using a dead center in the chamber?
 
Wow !

There is a wealth of information in that old man!
Just looking at the picks, it is clear that he was an absolute expert! Not many people have the ability (or are willing) to do the things that he did.
The first pic that shows the index marks on the chuck back plate and the gears show that he was serious.
Others have mentioned getting as much info as possible. I agree completely!
My step dad passed 7 years ago, and my dad 3 years ago. Both of them took tons of wisdom from them. I learned huge amounts from them, but wish I could go back and ask more.
I think it is absolutely FANTASTIC that you got this lathe. It will always be a great reminder of your friend and mentor.
Wonderful for both of you.
 
Good luck with it (I'm an 07 FFL).
Looks like you cut the threads using a dead center in the chamber?

Hi tobnpr. That setup was unrealistic for anything other than just test cutting some threads. It was a 6" scrap section of barrel which included little more than the chamber and tenon. I simply chucked up the bore-end in my 3-jaw and took advantage of the cone breech, using the dead center it to center the chamber for my tenon thread cutting test.

For work I have done on full barrels, I have always chucked up one end wrapped in copper sheet (typically the muzzle) and supported the other end in a steady rest. That seems to work well and generally finds a true center for the chamber, although I am not sure this is the best way. I'd be interested to hear how others do it.

Because I am usually working on antique parts, on which I am frequently trying to preserve the original bluing, the steady rest is not always ideal. If there are other ways to chuck up a barrel which permits properly centered work on the tenon, AND preserves the original bluing, I would be interested in hearing it.

y7ujxdmc


By the way - this photo is a bit old... in more recent photos of this steady rest you will see it is already stripped of its original gray paint. I am going to have John's "lathe green" paint color-matched and will order up the right paint to make this steady rest look like it belongs with John's lathe :) This photo also shows John's home-brewed taper attachment being put to use.
 








 
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