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South Bend Model A lathe restoration service?

Roadmster39

Plastic
Joined
May 5, 2022
Howdy,
I'm new here and posted this question at the OWWM forum, but a user suggested this may be a better place to ask.
This may be a long shot, but I have the above lathe and am wondering if there is anyone out there who offers restoration services? I'm located in Southern California, so ideally someone within a reasonable driving distance, although I would consider shipping if necessary. Thanks!

Erik
 

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Roadmster39

Plastic
Joined
May 5, 2022
Good point. I agree that it appears to be mechanically in good shape, but I have not checked anything out with regard to runout or backlash. There are still scrape marks on the bed, so that's positive.

I would like it to be in fine condition cosmetically. Currently it has a somewhat average repaint in gray and some white overspray and drips. I'm shooting for it to be mechanically sound with a nice repaint and restored nameplate, something that's a pleasure to look at.

Money is always an object, especially as I have one kid in college and another about to enter college, but I'm willing to throw some money at it. I just don't have a feel for what kind of dollars are required.

It also has a turret tailstock (not pictured) which I understand is fairly rare.
 

dalmatiangirl61

Diamond
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
Wipe it down and put it to work, it appears someone before you gave it a basic functional restoration. There will be backlash in all the knobs, that is normal as long as it is under half of a revolution, less is better, but backlash is inherent in the design. Paying someone to restore it for you will quickly exceed the value of the machine, these are simple machines, any work that needs to be done is a diy job. There is a plethora of info here on previous restorations, and lots of tutorials on youtube. You can find "How to run a lathe" on the net, read it cover to cover, let us know when you need help. That is a nice beginners lathe, when/if you decide you want something better, buy a better lathe, send that one to the next beginner.
 

jim rozen

Diamond
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Location
peekskill, NY
...one kid in college and another about to enter college, ...

Yeah, unless you're bill gates or something, you want to just use this machine. It's a pleasure to look at right now. Clean it up and see what needs fixing, put it to work. Spend a few dollars on tooling to make it work best.
 

texasgeartrain

Titanium
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Location
Houston, TX
I'm not from CA, can't recommend anyone. Though you might look for a manual machine shop, not a high production shop, something like a "round the way" kind of place. They should know what they are looking at to check tolerances, oils, etc. Might do a re-felt for you. And would guess they would know what paint, and what not to.

But It actually does not look terrible now. My suggestion is go to Home Depot in the paint section. Buy a one gallon can of mineral spirits. Get some rubber gloves if you need it. Use rags and wash/rub it down with that mineral spirits. It'll look a whole lot nicer clean.

I wouldn't do that on that nice wood top though.
 

Tony Quiring

Titanium
Joined
Nov 5, 2008
Location
Madera county california usa
It looks Good from here...

Restore not right term. Overhaul is better.

Download southbend how to run a lathe, many versions, get a couple.

Other task is order the overhaul kit that has all of the felts and the manual.

They have one specific to your model.

We have a SB 14.5 which is not as common so no kit when we did ours. But book covered it.

The book has each assembly laid out like department store.

Pick any one and it has teardown and repair tips with clear instructions.

Clear photos and instructions so anyone who wishes to learn how to use a lathe could use this to refurbish theirs.

You then know haw everything works.

Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk
 

Roadmster39

Plastic
Joined
May 5, 2022
Thanks everyone, I think you've shamed me into doing it myself. As a little backstory, I work in a family business that offers packaging services and we have a machine shop to support our packaging equipment (mills, lathes, fabrication equipment,etc).

This lathe has been sitting around our shop for 40 years. My Dad learned to run a lathe on one exactly like this, so it's a little bit of a nostalgia trip to get it looking and running sweet. I've ordered the book and rebuild kit and I'll start hacking away as time permits. Cheers!

Erik

Erik
 

Dobermann

Hot Rolled
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Location
North Carolina
Wipe it down, oil it, use it. Paying somebody to "restore" the machine will quickly run you bankrupt. They are simple machines and they don't need to be "mint perfect" to do quality work. Yours looks pretty good. Don't waste your time and money messing around with "restoration." Also, don't bother to paint it unless you want to keep it in your living room as a conversation piece. Use it!!
 

dalmatiangirl61

Diamond
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Location
BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
This lathe has been sitting around our shop for 40 years.

I must say, it is in surprisingly good condition for sitting that long, did you clean it at all before taking pics? It seems to be missing the rust patina so many get when sitting unused. Yes it might need felts, but then again whomever painted it 40 years ago might have replaced them and never even oiled them:D

Edit: Between the barely scratched paint on the QCGB, and the cleanliness of the gear train on headstock, it looks like someone restored it 40 years ago and never used it.
 

animal12

Cast Iron
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Location
CA USA
Go visit this guy on Amazon . Buy his book & rebuild kit . When you get it read it some , then pull your spindle & check your felts . You can ruin that lathe real quick is the felts are dry or bad . If you don't have the history of
the lathe its cheap insurance . after you go through the book a few times you'll figure out that these things aren't rocket science & you can do it your self . As far as cosmetics just keep this in mind " Sanity over Vanity "
Amazon.com: South Bend Lathe Rebuild Kit - 9" Model A, B & C : Tools & Home Improvement

animal
 








 
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