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Spindle liners - 3D printed???

Seems like an ingenious use for the technology. The benefit is precisely that it doesn't need to be printed solid. You could do a 20-25% infill, it would be plenty strong, give it whatever wall thicknesses you want, plus the infill and print any length and diameters you need. Lighter, less material. Damn, I can get a liner out of my printer, in only two pieces. Thanks for sharing this.
 
You could do a 20-25% infill, it would be plenty strong, give it whatever wall thicknesses you want, plus the infill and print any length and diameters you need. Lighter, less material.

OK, I did not think of that.
BUT!
Does the 25% infill reduce the cycle time?
These damned things are 3' in length, and even if you can print all 10 of them at once ( perhaps an 18 x 18 envelope ), can it be done in 8 hours or so?
Do it for yourself and ignore the time is one thing, but to sell it @ $85/pop with material seems ...

Or, am I just way behind the times on what's possible with 3D printing in plastics...
 
Does the 25% infill reduce the cycle time?
Yes, it does. Imagine the inner and outer circles. Those get to be whatever the requested shell thickness is. Then in the space between them, the slicer can fill with a variety of kinds of patterns: hex, grid, straight lines, whatever. So yeah, it only has to print the edges of those hexes or whatever. It doesn't have to poop out enough material to fill it solid. That speeds it up considerably as well as cutting down the weight and material consumed.

Do it for yourself and ignore the time is one thing, but to sell it @ $85/pop with material seems ...
Yeah, I see your point and kind of agree. My printer is pretty low-end and not very fast. At the same time, there are people with print farms of machines. Yes, that seems like a deal for that much plastic and hassle.

I just made a 2" OD, 0.75" ID cylinder, 10" long in Solidworks. Saved it as STL, ran it through the slicer software. At 20% infill, the 10" cylinder calculates just under 16 hours or 1.6 hours per running inch of liner. Do the math for your own spindle length.
 
They're probably printed in sections and joined. Also newer printers are quite fast. I have a FLSUN V400 and it would probably take around 20 minutes to print an inch of spindle liner at 20% infill.

I have actually printed quite a lot of spindle bushes, but never a full liner yet.
 
They're probably printed in sections and joined.


That appears to be how he makes them.

He's also selling the Fusion 360 cad for $50, and STEP/STL for $125 using your provided dimensional requirements. Enterprising bastard this one

Based on the picture he might be using a Prusa printer(s)

Any $200-250 printer will work
 
2.5 days to make $85.50?

Your missing the point of 3D printing. Assuming you've mastered some of the vagaries of 3D printing it's an easy unattended way of making money.

Load the filament
Load the gcode file
Put Elmers glue on the bed (my SOP)
Start
Walk away
Come back to a finished part.

The newer Bambu printers are MUCH faster then my Prusa. If I thought of commercially 3D printing parts I'd get Bambu printers. That 2.5 days would be a considerably less.

Plus depending on what model of Bambu you get you can print your spindle liners in 4 different colors.
 
I 3d print my own liners but I do a sleeve method. I use the common size 1in and 2in trusty cook liners and then 3d print sleeves that fit into those for the diameters I need. The material to 3d print one of those is probably around $20. I just got one of the newer style fast printers and I can print a guide tube and spindle liner set in about 12hours.
 
Seems like an ingenious use for the technology. The benefit is precisely that it doesn't need to be printed solid. You could do a 20-25% infill, it would be plenty strong, give it whatever wall thicknesses you want, plus the infill and print any length and diameters you need. Lighter, less material. Damn, I can get a liner out of my printer, in only two pieces. Thanks for sharing this.
Yepppp you literally said my ideas haha
 
I found these guys about a month ago and was thinking of getting a few standard sizes for the GT27. I think a $1500 printer would earn me my $ back while learning how to use it also. I am kind of leaning in this direction, but do need a few liners for my machine. Thought about making delrin bushings and stacking them out 36" or so.

These liners are made overnight I believe. They had a quick ship time I remember. Its hard to pass up just paying them and receiving liners a week later.
 
Do these make a coolant sponge?
Maybe but, then there's no reason to not make something to mitigate that. The trap I find myself falling into over and over: seeing all solutions as if they need to be made on a mill or lathe. 3D printers have demonstrated that they are sometimes terrible at making precise flat, round and square shapes. What comes with that is that you can also make crazy, complicated parts, that use swept shapes that might otherwise be laughably complex using what we're used to.

Example: you could design a coolant slinger that fits around the chuck jaws. It could fling the coolant and chips away from the opening, before it ever gets near the spindle bore. You could make one design in Solidworks. When a new job needs a different bar size or other details, you change those parameters, save it and print a new one. Keep them in the drawer for future jobs.

I think I've shared part of this before. I wanted something to hold an indicator on spindle centerline to use as a tool presetter. I broke out of the normal rectangle and circle shapes we might use for something like this.

I started with a 1" plug that could fit in a collet or a chuck. Then I sketched out where the indicator needed to have its mount. In between, I sketched a path for the shape to transition. Finally, did a swept surface, as if it were a duct, going from round to rectangular. Punched a round pocket through that swept shape so the indicator stem had somewhere to nest. Put a blend radius on all the edges because we can and it doesn't cost any extra headache. Printed it and it works great. It lives on the machine now.IMG_4706.jpgIMG_4708.jpgIMG_4707.jpg
 
I printed a semisubmerged suction float for a coalescer in PLA and it never seemed to change it's bouyancy, so I guess these are probably safe from coolant.

However, I would seriously question the durability of them compared to solid PU/PE liners.
 
Well, I guess you ought to sell your coolant slinger idea to some of the lathe manufacturers then. Both of my lathe’s have coolant catchers on the backs of the spindles.

I see a whole bunch of 3d printed stuff for sale that I’d never put my name on it total garbage. I don’t doubt there are good applications but I’m not sold on many of them.
 








 
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