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Spindle liners - 3D printed???

Print in PLA+ or PLA Pro. It's remarkably tough and not much more expensive; much tougher than ABS.
PETG and PLA Pro are much better compared to PLA or ABS, but no printed filament plastic is anywhere close to solid in terms of strength and durability, even the fibre reinforced ones.

I am generally a printing advocate, but the risk vs reward is way too high on something like a spindle liner. Like I said, I've printed spindle bushes for long parts, but only for one offs or short runs. The risk of failure of a printed liner in an unattended bar fed application is too high IMHO.
 
I've 3D printed a few and compared to the HAAS supplied ones I'd say they're more robust and fit the bar much better therefore I get less vibration on the machine. I've not run them as much as the HAAS ones but will do going forwards.

For anyone interested, on a 2.5" spindle bore down to 1-1/8" bar at just over a meter length took about 24 hours on a Bambu X1C. They were printed in 5 pieces and glued together with epoxy. On my older Creality Ender 5 that probably would have taken 3 days or more.

As for durability of the filament, about 3 years ago I prototyped some coolant fittings in our HAAS lathe with the intention of making them out of aluminium once the design was proven. I've still got some of those and the ones that have been replaced have only been so because the design was improved to allow better coolant flow. I've also made a coolant ring for our HURCO VMC and again, that only got replaced after about 18 months of use because I made an improvement to the design.
 
PETG is resistant to coolant, and holds up well enough to chips and clumsy operators. Unlike Nylon or reinforced materials its really cheap, and really easy to print on any printer without need for fancy nozzles, heated chambers, etc...

I have some PETG "sump suckers" in the bottom of our chip bins that have lived submerged in runoff coolant and are constantly battered by tons of chips for well over a year and have no visible wear.
I also have spring loaded PETG "hands" mounted to our lathe turrets for holding parts while we rechuck, again years of being blasted by chips and coolant without wear.
And I've printed spindle liner segments (right diameter liner was about 12" too short) and had no issue with the bar wobbling or the liner being crushed.
Also have a handful of handy little clips with magnets in them for holding auxiliary air or coolant lines in just the right spot for tricky washdowns and such.
 
PETG is resistant to coolant, and holds up well enough to chips and clumsy operators. Unlike Nylon or reinforced materials its really cheap, and really easy to print on any printer without need for fancy nozzles, heated chambers, etc...

I have some PETG "sump suckers" in the bottom of our chip bins that have lived submerged in runoff coolant and are constantly battered by tons of chips for well over a year and have no visible wear.
I also have spring loaded PETG "hands" mounted to our lathe turrets for holding parts while we rechuck, again years of being blasted by chips and coolant without wear.
And I've printed spindle liner segments (right diameter liner was about 12" too short) and had no issue with the bar wobbling or the liner being crushed.
Also have a handful of handy little clips with magnets in them for holding auxiliary air or coolant lines in just the right spot for tricky washdowns and such.
Mind sharing a photo of these “hands”
Love seeing new ideas :)

This could turn into a 3D print idea post :p

One simple print I started using with great luck is a material cradle V with a flat on the end.
Used to place my stock into the chuck the correct length.
Simple, foolproof. Lives with the job bin for next time.
 
Mind sharing a photo of these “hands”
Love seeing new ideas :)

This could turn into a 3D print idea post :p

One simple print I started using with great luck is a material cradle V with a flat on the end.
Used to place my stock into the chuck the correct length.
Simple, foolproof. Lives with the job bin for next time.
I like that stock setter. I had one made from aluminum angle with a sliding component and a set screw so it would get adjusted to each job.
Print one dedicated to each job and keep on hand with jobs is a better idea so you can't mess it up!

There's the hand, just a 3D printed pad with a spring slipped over it, and then another 3D printed base piece so it can be bolted to a flange.
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I've had a few printers; some cheap Creality and Anycubic FDM and resin printers. Resin printers were my go-tos for print quality and durability for a long time.
I finally settled on an Elegoo Jupiter resin printer and a Bambu X1C FDM.

The idiot-proof-ness of the Bambu means it gets about 20x as much use as the resin printer which now is collecting dust, except when I really need high quality finishes or want to get a good buzz going from the vapors :crazy:.
 
Son far leaning towards the Bambu PIP or the PIS.......I don't know enough yet to understand the need for the enclosure?
You want the enclosure helps with printing the fancier materials that need to be kept warm while printing.

I was in the fence for long time on getting a 3d printer. I got the Bambu X1 Carbon and I should have done it a lot sooner.

I have had one bad print, a ER32 collet holder setup for my tool box. The first time using PETG and the stock parameters weren’t quite hot enough and it went a bit funky. Turned up the heat on the nozzle a little and been working good since.

It’s quite the rabbit hole. I have fallen in pretty far. Still need to learn a lot more but I have boughten probably more in different filament types and colors now then I spent on the printer 😂

I need some more spindle liners. This is awesome. Can’t wait to try printing some.

Nice thing with the 3d printer is it can’t really hurt anything. Just make your model, slice it up and hit print. Come back later and it’s either good or it’s bad. Been making toys for the kids lots, let it run over night, no big deal.

I have made battery holders for my cordless tools, hooks for my drill and impact, collet holders, remote control holders for the tv, some repair parts for an old machine I had that needed some covers replaced.
 
If you're not strapped for cash and want something fast, easy, and reliable, get the Bambu X1C. The enclosure keeps the part warm during printing, which helps layer adhesion (strength) and reduces warping. The only reason I can think of to skip the enclosure is if you can't afford it.
 
Son far leaning towards the Bambu PIP or the PIS.......I don't know enough yet to understand the need for the enclosure?
I believe their less expensive printers now come with at least the option for an enclosure if it's not actually standard.
Do get an enclosure, and do get an AMS.
Enclosures are nice to keep your build volume temperature stable which prevents warping, delamination between layers, unsticking, maintain (low) humidity, etc..., and also for printing bougie materials, but some of those also require a special nozzle and hotend.
The AMS is a godsend for just being able to swap colors/materials without having to actually do any work. Its also nice to keep the printer running since it can automatically switch over spools when one runs out.

If you can only have one get the AMS to start, and tape some cardboard panels around the printer to simulate an enclosure
 
My son who is graduating this year from high school and going to university for mechanical engineering, just bought one of the Bambu PS1 I think they are called. He really likes it. He is using it for small engineering projects for school and stuff for his mountain bike. I haven’t seen it yet (he lives with his mom 6 hours away) but he has been super impressed over his cheaper creality one he had
 
Well, now would get the P1S combo........after this discussion........
would i order the hot plate and spare head?
PETG is where i would start

I bought a couple of the new textured PEI plates. No glue stick needed. Work great for first layer adhesion

I like the textured plate. As soon as it cools a little parts fall off.

 
I bought a couple of the new textured PEI plates. No glue stick needed. Work great for first layer adhesion

I like the textured plate. As soon as it cools a little parts fall off.

My V400 came with a textured PEI plate - it's double sided, but I use the textured side. The plate is flexible and sticks to the magnetic bed plate, if the part is too stuck just pull the plate off the bed and peel it off the bottom of the part.

It really does work great, I have never used, nor ever needed to use any glue on this printer. Nor ever needed to clean the plate beyond a quick wipe with ipa on a cloth.

I have a lot of good things to say about this printer, I weighed it heavily against the X1C when I bought it, not sure I made the right choice ultimately, but I definitely didn't make the wrong one. There is no AMS equivalent for the V400, but otherwise they trade pros and cons.
 
My only complaint with the bamboo X1 ( and I’m sure the rest built on that frame) is they advertise 10x10 build space.
But you need to modify the printer to get this by removing the filament cutter “bumper” (front left corner) and modifying the programming (something like that)
I was pretty peeved as I had planned on printing 10x10 parts trays that fit in my standard 10x10 boxes I use.

Otherwise it’s been great.
Compact and quick.
My brother has a Prussia mk4. It’s very impressive too.
He has that think printing most hours of the day for a year now. (Prints toys for kids at his eye clinic)
 
A decent budget option for a newer style fdm printer is the Qidi Q1 pro. I got one a couple weeks ago as an upgrade from an Ender 3. Currently still at the launch price of $460.
 
Question...Bambu sells their own filament...$21 a roll

So is PETG the same or does the $12/15 dollar roll substandard stuff?
I have bought a couple cheap rolls off Amazon. Esun I think?

But haven’t used them yet. I have stuck with the Bambu stuff just to hopefully cut out part of the learning curve for a failed print. Another bonus is somehow they get filament to me in the middle of nowhere, well to the nearby town which is in middle of nowhere as well, over night, and for free if I spend $60 Canadian.
 
For anybody on the fence about buying a 3D printer: every one of these threads devolves into guys sharing all their experiences and this nuance and that nuance (meaning well). And then it becomes feature overload, you're not sure what price point to jump in at and so you do nothing: analysis paralysis. You're not sure you want to drop $500-1,000 on something you might not use. That's where I was for too many years.

I stumbled onto a Creality Ender 3D clone (Longer LK5) for $100 at Goodwill. It had a bad power switch. I fixed that, aligned it, downloaded the slicer software, ordered some regular old PLA filament and I've been printing since. I've got more money in filament than I do in hardware. Total maybe $250?

And I've printed a ton of stuff. I even made a close-out to fill a gap in my VF-2's sheet metal (around the tool changer structure). I shared the indicator holder earlier. I printed custom sized trays for the toolboxes for all the various sized vise screws, stops and pins.

The recommendations for the Bambu stuff seem to be universal but, almost any printer is better than no printer. Like any other machine, you'll evolve your tastes, wants and needs as you learn to use it but, don't let all this talk stop you from jumping on the train.

If you have a friend that is maybe upgrading to something else and offers you a "killer deal" on a five year old printer, take it and see if you use it. Pay $300 for a used printer and worse case, sell it to someone else for $250. Give it to a teen or tweenager getting into printing and CAD. Take it outside and light fire to it. It was only $250.

With all that said, a buddy of mine bought a Creality Ender 5 just before I bought mine and he hasn't taken it out of the box. It's not for everyone. :D
 








 
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