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Step down from 600V 3 phase to 460 volt single phase 14A ?

Laurentian

Stainless
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Location
Canada
Hi guys, am fancying a used H.T. oven that was built to handle 460 V 1 phase, 14A
Up here we have power coming into the buiding at 600V, 3 phase.
We use quite a few step down transformers for our machine tools, but always 3 phase in and 3 phase out. Only single phase we have in building is the regular 120 and 208 voltages.

Is this spec. even possible with what he have ? I don't mind purchasing a special transformer if need be and I've seen some that convert single phase to 3 phase so am wondering if opposite is at all possible ? Forgive my ignorance I'm more of a mechanical guy.

Thanks much.
 
A regular 3 phase transformer should still work, just use one phase of the outputs. Probably be easier to find.

Might be able to power it with a single leg of the 600v three phase. I think its 347 volts?
 
A regular 3 phase transformer should still work, just use one phase of the outputs. Probably be easier to find.

Might be able to power it with a single leg of the 600v three phase. I think its 347 volts?
OK thanks I'll call my sparky tomorrow and see what he thinks. I did some digging and any special transformer option is big money. I do have quite the transformer collection in storage and probably have something that would work if hook up is as you say.

Otherwise the furnace would need to be rewired 3 phase which entails new elements ( 3 sets one for each phase ) and the like, so again lots of cost.
 
Have you opened up the electrical box to look at how it's currently wired? Any possibility that the existing elements are simply connected differently for three individual legs vs a pair?
 
It may be DC .....fullwave rectified 600v would be around 460DC...........at 14A its going to be a small furnace .....I got a 12x12x24 size in the yard ,and it was 415/35A........too much amps to sell ......everyones 'gas ,gotta be gas,its cheaper ,and you dont need wiring.'
 
A lot of big, industrial-sized heating elements are designed to be three phase. This might be as simple as six individual windings, being spec'd for 208-230V and they were wired in series-parallel to work on 460V single phase.
 
OK thanks I'll call my sparky tomorrow and see what he thinks. I did some digging and any special transformer option is big money. I do have quite the transformer collection in storage and probably have something that would work if hook up is as you say.

Otherwise the furnace would need to be rewired 3 phase which entails new elements ( 3 sets one for each phase ) and the like, so again lots of cost.
If a little rewiring dont scare you then you should be able to get it to work on 347 for sure. Just get proper voltage to the controls and the 460 element will run on 347 for sure, just slightly less power. And the controls might even work as it is.

Like others said it may be a combination of elements that can be rewired, worth looking at.
 
Have you opened up the electrical box to look at how it's currently wired? Any possibility that the existing elements are simply connected differently for three individual legs vs a pair?
Good idea, but furnace is thousands of km's from me at the moment. Maybe I can get pics.
 
Incidentally ,the furnace elements are flexible when you buy them,but go brittle when fired up.........so dont try bending any element connections .
Yeah, we get that all the time on one in particular. About a twice yearly change out when running 2000F
 
A lot of big, industrial-sized heating elements are designed to be three phase. This might be as simple as six individual windings, being spec'd for 208-230V and they were wired in series-parallel to work on 460V single phase.
I was doing some digging and some of the kiln manufacturers go this route as I found some online .pdf wiring diagrams to the effect. Good idea !
 
If a little rewiring dont scare you then you should be able to get it to work on 347 for sure. Just get proper voltage to the controls and the 460 element will run on 347 for sure, just slightly less power. And the controls might even work as it is.

Like others said it may be a combination of elements that can be rewired, worth looking at.
I think this may very well be the direction we take. Also new elements are always a good thing if need be.
 
I miss wired a friend's kiln when i re-did his electrical outlets and plugs. has a fancy digital controller, for 120v instead of 240.
controller and everything worked just fine, kiln didn't get very hot.

I suspect a 440v HT oven will have a 120v or 240v transformer internally to power the control brains.
 








 
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