What's new
What's new

surface plate cleaner - Windex vs lighter fluid

I might give the lighter fluid a shot on one of our plates. When we bought it it had a blue stain in one spot that has yet to be lifted. Tried acetone, thinner, mineral spirits, alcohol.... some made it a shade lighter but nothing dissolved and lifted it out of the pours. I almost want to know what kind of ink or Dykem it was as it would make for a much more effective prank to put on your buddies ball cranks.
 
I always used glass cleaner, cause that is what we had at work. If it was real dirty we used Aerokroil first. Maintenance machine shop, so it happens.
The guy that owns Surburban tool uses amonia, so I started using that at my home shop.

Dave
 
I might give the lighter fluid a shot on one of our plates. When we bought it it had a blue stain in one spot that has yet to be lifted. Tried acetone, thinner, mineral spirits, alcohol.... some made it a shade lighter but nothing dissolved and lifted it out of the pours.

My plate had a small area in one corner that looked like a sticker had once been there and been peeled off and then collected dirt. Probably not exactly that, because it was smoother than that would have been, but it had persisted for several years according to the seller. I wasn't particularly thinking about it but after cleaning with lighter fluid that little rectangular patch was gone. There was one area that looked sort of like a thumbprint that remained, though. I saw a guy who inspects plates for a living rubbing on a similar mark with a Cratex stick, one of their gray-green extra fine ones. He said it removed "metal smears" without harming the granite. I took a little Cratex out and wetted my thumbprint-looking area with a couple of drops of lighter fluid and rubbed on it with the Cratex stick and that area came clean. I had never had a plate without one or two of that type of marking on it and so I was really glad to learn they can easily be removed.

metalmagpie
 
Hello, yes I used to sell Tru-Stone granite plates before Starrett bought them. They're in St Cloud, MN about 90 mile drive. One day while inside the factory one of the employees was hand pumping some red liquid out of a 55 gallon barrel and he laughed it was red Windex they sold for $28.00 a gallon. That was 25 years ago. It probably now costs $75.00. Lol. They also sold a cream. I now use Goop that reminds me of the creamI buy at Walmart for $2.00 a 1 pound container. I use my gloved hand and rub it on first for a longtime on the stained plate. I then use a white cloth until no blue comes off the on the white rag. Then I use Windex.
My friend Lance Baltzley who has a friend who taught him to lap surface plates and his friend who worked for Kearny Trecker taught him to use Windex. This question has many answers. I've never worked using lighter fluid or acetone as I would feel it staines the pours in the stone. There's many ways to skin a cat.
 
Richard you have been around long enough to see many examples of re-badging and then selling for a much higher price as a specialised product. I am constantly astounded by the gullibility of the shooters that I deal with who pay high prices for standard tool room items.

  • Concentricity gauges sold for checking bullet run out have been used by standards rooms for years to check ground pins.
  • Bedding compound is a bog standard type of epoxy sold in a over priced little container.
  • Barrel lapping compounds are jewelers rouge.
  • The number of special firearms lubricants that are just re-badged are too numerous to count.
  • The best one in my opinion is the guys that claim a special super accurate honing machine specific to barrels. A Sunnen deep hole hone with air gauge and software that calculates where to hone to achieve the tolerances set in the software.
As they say "a fool and his money are easily parted".
 
Picked up a case of Creeping Crud in Seattle a few days ago -- the HMO Advise Nurse says it's most likely flu or RSV -- and since I got home, I've had plenty of time to think about whatever crosses my mind while laying in bed.

One thing that had been chewing on the back of my mind was this question, triggering an old memory of a Precision Measurement class I took at San Jose City College in the mid 1980s.

The man who taught the class had started his career as a machinist, moved into inspection, and on up to Quality Engineer. He knew his stuff.

At any rate, he favored a DIY surface table cleaner made to a recipe that he said had been developed by the Metrology Department of a major US Government Contractor in Sunnyvale (the likely suspects were Lockheed Missiles and Space, Westinghouse Marine System, and ESL).

The formula was pretty simple: 1 gallon less 1 pint of deionized water, 1 pint of 70% plain rubbing alcohol, and 1/2 teaspoon Joy dishwashing liquid. Mix them together, and label the bottle with the solution's use and make-up.

He also stressed that no pearlescent dishwashing liquid should ever be used, that if necessary to use something other than Joy it should be clear. He also commented that a 750 ml bottle of 40 proof vodka could be substituted for the rubbing alcohol, BUT most employers would terminate an employee for bring a liquor bottle onto their site.

Interestingly, I'm pretty sure that this formula exactly matches the Consumer Reports recommendation for DIY window cleaner.
 
Picked up a case of Creeping Crud in Seattle a few days ago -- the HMO Advise Nurse says it's most likely flu or RSV -- and since I got home, I've had plenty of time to think about whatever crosses my mind while laying in bed.

One thing that had been chewing on the back of my mind was this question, triggering an old memory of a Precision Measurement class I took at San Jose City College in the mid 1980s.

The man who taught the class had started his career as a machinist, moved into inspection, and on up to Quality Engineer. He knew his stuff.

At any rate, he favored a DIY surface table cleaner made to a recipe that he said had been developed by the Metrology Department of a major US Government Contractor in Sunnyvale (the likely suspects were Lockheed Missiles and Space, Westinghouse Marine System, and ESL).

The formula was pretty simple: 1 gallon less 1 pint of deionized water, 1 pint of 70% plain rubbing alcohol, and 1/2 teaspoon Joy dishwashing liquid. Mix them together, and label the bottle with the solution's use and make-up.

He also stressed that no pearlescent dishwashing liquid should ever be used, that if necessary to use something other than Joy it should be clear. He also commented that a 750 ml bottle of 40 proof vodka could be substituted for the rubbing alcohol, BUT most employers would terminate an employee for bring a liquor bottle onto their site.

Interestingly, I'm pretty sure that this formula exactly matches the Consumer Reports recommendation for DIY window cleaner.
Ah, but the Joy of today is different than the Joy of the '80s. May still work.
 








 
Back
Top