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Swapping drivetrain in an old Hyster...

I'd also vote 4.3 v6. Tons of power for a mid size forklift.

If you use a th400 is there a way you can make the inching pedal work? I'd really miss the inching pedal in a heavy forklift with an auto.

All this said, old Hysters are still common. If I could find a decent engine/Hystermatic combo I'd definitely run it.
 
Id certainly check clearances in the frame before trying to fit any V motor .....My H80 has a Perkins diesel factory fitted ,but I know engine swaps to the Perkins 4/236 motor have struck clearance problems.
 
I'd also vote 4.3 v6. Tons of power for a mid size forklift.

If you use a th400 is there a way you can make the inching pedal work? I'd really miss the inching pedal in a heavy forklift with an auto.

All this said, old Hysters are still common. If I could find a decent engine/Hystermatic combo I'd definitely run it.

Guess I don't know what an inching pedal is...

I couldn't remember yesterday, but it's a '65 H120C if it makes a difference. It has 8.25 x 15 tires on it with duals..

This one is a flat 6 Continental and a 3 spd trans with a couple rods sticking out of the seat frame with no knobs or anything on them, it was fun trying to figure out which combo of in/out the rods had to be for low gear. It has a clutch housing that is wet and a hydraulic throw out? Idk exactly how that part works. Partly because it has only worked right once, every other time I have been on it, it takes everything I have to push the clutch pedal in and hold it enough to drop it in gear. It also has the F/R box with that shifter on the column. Maybe I have something screwy with the hyd system on the clutch? The mast system works as it should, so I don't think whole hyd system is bad.

Also just realized it may be hard to use a F/R box while the auto trans is in gear which would nullify the reason to have one I think. It may make more sense just to use the auto trans and shift it F/R.

Oh, main reason I was thinking v8 is I have some on hand vs I don't have a 4.3, would have to find one.
 
i know this is a more can it be done rather than do it. but any resale this forklift has now will be gone once its modified I have seen 6 to 10 thousand dollar forklifts go or 1 to 2 thousand because of a motor re-power, and that's was with an engine more valuable than the whole forklift. its scrap with a transmission mod once your done with it. take the hours you will spend doing this and get a newer nicer one. on the other hand a 200 hp forklift, wow, now your help will have a party with that lol.
 
Guess I don't know what an inching pedal is...

I couldn't remember yesterday, but it's a '65 H120C if it makes a difference. It has 8.25 x 15 tires on it with duals..

This one is a flat 6 Continental and a 3 spd trans with a couple rods sticking out of the seat frame with no knobs or anything on them, it was fun trying to figure out which combo of in/out the rods had to be for low gear. It has a clutch housing that is wet and a hydraulic throw out? Idk exactly how that part works. Partly because it has only worked right once, every other time I have been on it, it takes everything I have to push the clutch pedal in and hold it enough to drop it in gear. It also has the F/R box with that shifter on the column. Maybe I have something screwy with the hyd system on the clutch? The mast system works as it should, so I don't think whole hyd system is bad.

Also just realized it may be hard to use a F/R box while the auto trans is in gear which would nullify the reason to have one I think. It may make more sense just to use the auto trans and shift it F/R.

Oh, main reason I was thinking v8 is I have some on hand vs I don't have a 4.3, would have to find one.

Forklifts with automatics have two brake pedals. The one on the left is the inching pedal. When you touch it it puts the trans in neutral so you can rev the motor to make the hydraulics fast without lurching the forklift.

Basically, if you use an automotive auto trans you will need to shift it into neutral to rev the engine. This will kind of suck.

I personally think the old Continental sixes are great forklift engines. Smooth, quiet, love running on propane and just fine power for a forklift.

I bet if you got that forklift put together right with everything adjusted properly you'd like it a lot.

I have a 1967 H80C with an extra 2000 lbs of counterweight so, basically an H120C lol. It has the 2 speed Hystermatic auto. I like it a lot. Better than most modern lifts I've driven.
 
Alice Cooper has a Citreon DS with a Corvette v8 in it. I think it was switched to rear drive. Wonder if they kept the hydraulic suspension?
Is the roll cage stock?
BilL D
https://www.carscoops.com/2013/10/buy-v8-powered-citroen-ds-and-have/√
 
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I was and still am considering getting a 30hp motor rewound for 72 or 96 volts and using an off the shelf EV motor controller and charger with lithium batteries. Like a regular electric forklift but one that is actually good.

It's also possible to use a 208V motor and a higher voltage battery stack, but I'd rather not die like that.
 
Per a write-up - likely in 4Wheeler magazine, Jeep EV's, or at least one particular model (CJ) was just an electric motor swapped for a gas motor. Same type tranny and whatnot.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
You need more than just a traction motor..........at least one motor for the lift hydraulics and steering ,or separate motors possibly more efficient .......I dont see any advantage of lightweight batteries ,usually the battery pack does duty as a counterweight.
 
You need more than just a traction motor..........at least one motor for the lift hydraulics and steering ,or separate motors possibly more efficient .......I dont see any advantage of lightweight batteries ,usually the battery pack does duty as a counterweight.
I would likely use a motor/pump combo for each function. It's easier to get good control that way.

I'm not going LiFePO4 for light weight. I just hate lead acid batteries. I want to use 90-100% of the capacity, not 50%, and I don't want battery maintenance. I probably won't have enough accessible space in a propane forklift to put lead acid batteries in and the motor alone will weigh as much as the engine did.
 
Per a write-up - likely in 4Wheeler magazine, Jeep EV's, or at least one particular model (CJ) was just an electric motor swapped for a gas motor. Same type tranny and whatnot.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
The ford ranger pickup was like that as well. Kept the factory automatic? transmission.
Bill D
 
I've never driven an electric forklift I liked. I have a Tesla and love it, but I will not own an electric forklift.
 
I'll chime in cause this is a fun thread. If I was going to re-power a 12k lift, incorporating an automotive auto tranny? First choice for me would be a Cummins 4bt paired to a Chrysler load-flight (fancy speak for medium duty truck 727). easy to find the combo in old bread-vans. And both units virtually indestructable with proper maintenance. Diesel is the best fuel in my mind. Todays gas is garbage in anything but a completely sealed fuel system (I know this because I still live with carburetors!). You could let the machine sit for a long time (years) and when you needed it, chances are it would fire right up. Obviously if using indoors, propane is really the only choice and would rule out diesel. In that case I would probably go slant-6. But that is more a personal thing with no other "real" good reason. A Jeep 4.0 could be put on propane super easy and would be a much better option, mated to a 727 of course. Just my heavily Chrysler biased .02.
 
Jeep 4.0, yes. Surprised no one’s attempted that (TMK). Bog reliable engines with a great torque curve. Last one I had went to 396k kms.

We’ve got an old Hyster 6k electric. Took some adjusting and a new battery, but runs predictably. Can’t plug with a propane lift, but then I do miss being able to lift over capacity by revving the guts out of it.
 








 
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